Bangladesh

Provision of life-saving WASH services for Rohingya Refugees in Bagghona/Potibonia (Camp 16), Ukhiya Upazila, Cox’s Bazar District: END LINE SURVEY REPORT

Provision of life-saving WASH services to the Rohingya refugee and host population project for Ukhia Upazila, Cox's Bazar district was implemented in Moynarghona (camp 16) by CARE Bangladesh with funding from UNICEF for twelve (12) months (February, 2019 to February, 2020). The goal of the project was to improve the quality of integrated WASH service delivery to support the well-being of children under 5 years, women, girls, men, boys the elderly and persons with disability in emergency situation. The project targeted 21,883 refugees (52% women and 48% men) with water, sanitation and hygiene promotion interventions.

CARE conducted the midterm assessment in February 2020. The survey involved both quantitative and qualitative data collection tools and approaches. The samples were drawn systematically, with the sample size determined following most common statistical formula. A total of 300 respondent/households from camp 16 participated and the data collection. The questionnaires were uploaded in tablets with KoBo data collection application for accuracy and timeliness.

The objectives of the study are as follows:
- To understand water access situation for the beneficiary households in the camp 16.
- To know the sanitation status and use by households in the camp 16.
- To identify current Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) of targeted respondent on water sanitation and hygiene practices.
- To identify water, sanitation and hygiene challenges for the households in camp 16. Read More...

COVID-19 Bangladesh Rapid Gender Analysis

Whilst lifesaving, the COVID-19 lockdown is disproportionately impacting women as existing gender inequalities are exacerbating gender-based disparities between women, men, girls and boys in terms of access to information, resources to cope with the pandemic,
and its socio-economic impact. It is therefore essential to undertake a gendered impact analysis of COVID-19.

The Gender in Humanitarian Action (GiHA) Working Group in Bangladesh has undertaken this Rapid Gender Analysis to inform national preparedness and response. Given the social distancing measures, RGA desk review contrasts pre-COVID-19 gender information and demographic data against new gender information from a multitude of surveys and qualitative sources. It examines the immediate impact of COVID-19 on pre-existing structural social and economic vulnerabilities of women, girls and diverse
gender groups, and the challenges faced by these groups in accessing information and health, education, and WASH, protection and Gender-Based Violence (GBV) services as well as support for livelihoods. The gendered impact of COVID-19 is evident in following six broad areas:
• Increased risks and evidence of GBV in the context of the pandemic and its responses;
• Unemployment, economic and livelihood impacts for the poor women and girls;
• Unequal access to health, education and WASH services;
• Unequal distribution of care and domestic work;
• Women and girls’ voices are not being included to inform a gender-targeted response; this is particularly the case for those most left behind;
• Policy response mechanisms do not incorporate gender analytical data or gender-responsive plans. Read More...

Combining GBV and Reproductive Health Services in Cox’s Bazar

Since 2018, CARE has implemented static health services at four health posts in CxB, GBV case management at 12 women and girls’ safe spaces, household and sub-block level sensitization for awareness on service availability through 14 outreach teams, and provision of basic health services at mobile outreach spots at the sub-block level. These comprehensive service and demand-side components addressing individual, household, and community barriers to accessing services have enabled a gender-responsive, integrated approach to reach women and girls. See the learning brief here: https://www.care.org/sites/default/files/cxb_srh_gbv_integration_learning_brief_final.pdf Read More...

Bangladesh COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis–Cox’s Bazar

As of 4 May 2020, 10,143 cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in Bangladesh. To date, only 21 cases have been identified in Cox’s Bazar district, which is home to over 850,000 Rohingya refugees and extremely vulnerable host communities. Although no positive COVID-19 cases have been reported in the camps, this is likely to change soon. The conditions in the camps, including overcrowding, limited sanitation facilities and overburdened health system, have made the COVID-19 situation uniquely complex.

A COVID-19 outbreak in the refugee camps and neighboring communities will disproportionately affect women and girls and other vulnerable populations. Gender norms in both refugee and host communities limit women’s and girls’ ability to protect themselves from the virus and have a significant impact on prevention and response efforts. Refugees are reporting “rapidly deteriorating security dynamics within the camps between Rohingya and host communities” stemming from fears around COVID-19.

Women are already being blamed for COVID-19, resulting in a rollback of women’s rights, including mobility, access to services and information. Men, women, and community leaders in are blaming women’s “dishonorable” behavior as the cause of COVID, causing a backlash against women’s rights. Women are experiencing more behavior policing, mobility restrictions, and Gender Based Violence. Read More...

CARE RGA of Myanmar refugee crisis (2017)

Between 25 August and 10 October 2017, an estimated 521,000 refugees from Myanmar have crossed the border from Myanmar to Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh following communal conflict in the Rakhine state of Myanmar. The numbers are likely to increase as people continue to cross the border and additional groups of new arrivals are identified. As a humanitarian organization, CARE has a mandate to respond to emergencies and is well positioned to do so due to its history of emergency response in the country; a decade-long presence in the southeast region (including Cox’s Bazar) through food security, disaster risk reduction (DRR), emergency response and women’s empowerment programs; and established relationships with government stakeholders and NGOs.

The objectives of the rapid gender analysis (RGA) were to understand the unique needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys among the newly arrived Myanmar refugees and, consequently, to formulate recommendations for action for the different sectors. Read More...

Rapid Analysis: How are female garment factory workers during COVID-19

Based on a rapid needs assessment with female garment workers in Bangladesh on the potential impacts of COVID 19, some key areas of concern are:

56% are concerned about mobility restrictions during lockdown which limits them to buy daily needs
39% faced food shortage/crisis
“35% feel uncertain about salary
9% reported sickness Read More...

Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) phase III & Improving Living Condition and Mitigating Monsoon Risk for the Refugees: Endline Study Report

CARE Bangladesh has partnered with IOM since November 2017 as Site Management Support Agency in Camp 16 (Potibunia) and since 01 January 2019 in Camp 13 of Ukhia upazila of Cox’s Bazar District.

A joint End-line assessment was conducted in both camps being site managed and coordinated by CARE Bangladesh (Camps 13 and 16) with the support from IOM and IRW. In addition, Shelter and WASH component were also supported by these two donors for selected HH. The purpose of this end-line study was to provide measurable data against project targets, indicators, outcomes and objectives, as well as to help prioritize activities and focus of work across the two locations.

Overall, the situation seemed improved more in camp 16 than in camp 13 followed by CARE intervention which was at the same level in the baseline. . Participation in decision making process block wise in both camps increased almost by 39%. 95% of respondents said that site development activity was done in last month that indicates the value of work actually ongoing. On the shelter response almost 66% responded they are having good quality shelter. Access to enough water for household need and water treatment stratus before drinking increased simultaneously in a good way. Open defecation is still having a concerning issues in both camp. A variety of factors might explain these differences that explained with deeper analysis in this report. Read More...

Terminal Evaluation of “Safe Motherhood Promotion Project Phase II”

This report details the findings from a quasi-experimental terminal evaluation of the Safe Motherhood Promotion Project (SMPP) conducted in the Narsingdi district of Bangladesh. SMPP is a Japanese aid-funded technical cooperation project aimed at developing local capacities to tackle maternal and newborn health problems in rural areas. The project aims to have a favorable impact on women’s access to and knowledge of maternal health care during pregnancy and childbirth. The project comprises a package of interlinked interventions to facilitate safe motherhood practices at primary and secondary care levels. This evaluation means to assess the achievements and implementation process based on five Development Assistance Committee (DAC) criteria consist of Relevance, Effectiveness, Efficiency, Impact, and Sustainability. Read More...

The NGO Health Service Delivery Project 2012 – 2018

Bangladesh is the tenth most densely populated country in the world.3 Despite its growing economy—it is expect- ed to become a middle-income country by 2020—the Government of Bangladesh (GOB) has not been able to invest sufficient resources in its health system. To close the gap, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) has formally integrated the non-governmen- tal organization (NGO) sector into the national health system. A significant proportion of this plan has included the Surjer Hashi (SH), or Smiling Sun, network, a group of NGOs supported by the United States Agency for In- ternational Development (USAID) and its implementing partners since 1997.
From 2012 to 2017, USAID supported the SH network through the NGO Health Service Delivery Project (NHSDP). The UK Department for International Devel- opment (DfID) provided additional funding beginning in the second project year. Led by Pathfinder International, NHSDP provided material and technical support to 25 NGOs, who served a catchment area of 26.3 million peo- ple through a network of 399 static and 10,872 satellite clinics and 11,842 community service providers.

This is the final report for this project and outlines the results from the project. Read More...

The NGO Health Service Delivery Project 2012 – 2018 – Final Report

From 2012 to 2017, USAID supported the Surjer Hashi (SH), or Smiling Sun, network through the NGO Health Service Delivery Project (NHSDP). The UK Department for International Development (DfID) provided additional funding beginning in the second project year. A consortium led by Pathfinder International, NHSDP provided material and technical support to 25 NGOs, who served a catchment area of 26.3 million people through a network of 399 static and 10,872 satellite clinics and 11,842 community service providers (CSPs). In its five years of implementation, the SH network made 251,490,942 services contacts, 8,237,567 of which were for antenatal care (ANC) and 42,577,833 were adolescents or youth. More than three million visits to SH clinics for children under five years of age integrated activities to monitor children’s growth and promote healthy nutrition. By providing 7,839,430 Couple Years' Protection, the SH network averted 2,000 maternal and 10,000 child deaths and 1.9 million unwanted pregnancies. Read More...

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