Regional/Global

Global COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis April 1

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organisation classified COVID-19 as a pandemic.1 Disease outbreaks affect women, girls, men, boys, and persons of all genders differently, to say nothing of the wide variety of at-risk and marginalised groups. The compounding complexities of development and humanitarian contexts can have disproportionate effects on women and girls, as well as those at-risk and vulnerable groups. CARE International identified the need to highlight the gender and intersectional impacts of the COVID-19 crisis.
To achieve this, CARE first developed a policy brief to review lessons learned from previous public health emergencies. CARE then adapted its Rapid Gender Analysis toolkit to develop the Global Rapid Gender Analysis on COVID-19, conducted in consultation with the International Rescue Committee (IRC). This report is for humanitarians working in fragile contexts that are likely to be affected by the COVID-19 crisis. It is organised around broad themes and areas of focus of particular importance to those whose programming advances gender equality and reduces gender inequalities. It seeks to deepen the current gender analysis available by encompassing learning from global gender data available for the COVID-19 public health emergency. Read More...

THE ROLE OF COLLECTIVES IN ACHIEVING WOMEN’S ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT: A CROSS-PROJECTANALYSIS

Collectives are a fundamental building block for much of CARE’s work. What are the greatest strengths of a collectives approach across projects? We combined data from many CARE collectives across projects and found that:
• The gender composition of the collective affects the intended outcomes.
• The most successful collectives are those with a balanced gender mix of collective members and women leaders. The second most successful collectives are those with a balanced gender mix and mixed gender leaders.
• CARE collectives are having an effect on women’s economic empowerment.
•CARE collectives are having a particularly strong effect on income, leadership, domestic decision making, production, violence and time use. Read More...

GBV Localization Mapping Study

Despite the presence of global commitments to GBV localization, including the 2016 WHS, the Grand Bargain, and the Call to Action on Protection From GBV in Emergencies2, there is little evidence to suggest that the protection of women and girls is being adequately prioritized or that women and WLOs are meaningfully integrated as change agents in response initiatives (Latimir & Mollett, 2018). The Global Protection Custer (GPC) remains significantly underfunded, with the GBV Sub-Cluster particularly underfunded when compared to other cluster areas (Fletcher-Wood and Mutandwa, 2018).

Global humanitarian funding data reported to the Financial Tracking System (FTS) between 2016 and 2018 found that GBV accounted for just 0.12% of all humanitarian funding, which represented only one-third of all GBV funding requests
(IRC, 2019). Localized funding across all humanitarian response remains strikingly low, with local agencies receiving just
0.4% of all humanitarian assistance funding in 2015 and 0.3% in 2016 (IRC, 2017). Currently, financial tracking mechanisms neither provide a means to report how much funding is targeted to women and girls nor how much funding is received by WLOs (Fletcher-Wood & Mutandwa, 2019). Read More...

Global Mapping Study on Gender Based Violence

Led by CARE and ActionAid as co-leads of the task team the purpose of this study was to examine existing evidence around the issue of localization within the context of GBV prevention, response and coordination initiatives in humanitarian contexts. The study also sought to gather field perspectives on the state of GBV localization, and to examine the degree to which the global commitment to localization within the context of the humanitarian GBV sector has been operationalized.

Data was collected from a range of stakeholders participating in GBV coordination, including GBV Sub-Cluster Coordinators, representatives from local and/or women-led organizations, staff from national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) along with global leaders engaged in the localization debate. In line with the GBV AoR’s mandate, the primary focus of this study was on settings involving internally-displaced persons.

The final report is comprised of the following three documents:
- Summary Report (English, Arabic, French, Spanish, Bahasa, and Bengali)
- Full Report: The full report contains a detailed description of the study’s background, methodology, findings, and recommendations, and provides a comprehensive presentation of the data gathered through this research along with implications for future action. (Link here: http://www.careevaluations.org/evaluation/gbv-localization-mapping-study/)
- Appendix of Tools and Guidance: The appendix of tools and guidance serves as a companion document to both the summary and full versions of the report, and provides an overview of existing resource materials that have been developed pertaining to GBV localization. Read More...

Global Mapping Study on Gender Based Violence

Global Mapping Study on GBV. Led by CARE and ActionAid as co-leads of the task team the purpose of this study was to examine existing evidence around the issue of localization within the context of GBV prevention, response and coordination initiatives in humanitarian contexts. The study also sought to gather field perspectives on the state of GBV localization, and to examine the degree to which the global commitment to localization within the context of the humanitarian GBV sector has been operationalized.

Data was collected from a range of stakeholders participating in GBV coordination, including GBV Sub-Cluster Coordinators, representatives from local and/or women-led organizations, staff from national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) along with global leaders engaged in the localization debate. In line with the GBV AoR’s mandate, the primary focus of this study was on settings involving internally-displaced persons.
The final report is comprised of the following three documents:
- Summary Report (English, Arabic, French, Spanish, Bahasa, and Bengali)
- Full Report: The full report contains a detailed description of the study’s background, methodology, findings, and recommendations, and provides a comprehensive presentation of the data gathered through this research along with implications for future action. (Link here: http://www.careevaluations.org/evaluation/gbv-localization-mapping-study/)
- Appendix of Tools and Guidance: The appendix of tools and guidance serves as a companion document to both the summary and full versions of the report, and provides an overview of existing resource materials that have been developed pertaining to GBV localization. Read More...

Global Mapping on Gender Based Violence

Global Mapping Study on GBV. Led by CARE and ActionAid as co-leads of the task team the purpose of this study was to examine existing evidence around the issue of localization within the context of GBV prevention, response and coordination initiatives in humanitarian contexts. The study also sought to gather field perspectives on the state of GBV localization, and to examine the degree to which the global commitment to localization within the context of the humanitarian GBV sector has been operationalized.

Data was collected from a range of stakeholders participating in GBV coordination, including GBV Sub-Cluster Coordinators, representatives from local and/or women-led organizations, staff from national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) along with global leaders engaged in the localization debate. In line with the GBV AoR’s mandate, the primary focus of this study was on settings involving internally-displaced persons.

The final report is comprised of the following three documents:
- Summary Report (English, Arabic, French, Spanish, Bahasa, and Bengali)
- Full Report: The full report contains a detailed description of the study’s background, methodology, findings, and recommendations, and provides a comprehensive presentation of the data gathered through this research along with implications for future action. (Link here: http://www.careevaluations.org/evaluation/gbv-localization-mapping-study/)
- Appendix of Tools and Guidance: The appendix of tools and guidance serves as a companion document to both the summary and full versions of the report, and provides an overview of existing resource materials that have been developed pertaining to GBV localization. Read More...

Global Mapping Study on Gender Based Violence

Global Mapping Study on GBV. Led by CARE and ActionAid as co-leads of the task team the purpose of this study was to examine existing evidence around the issue of localization within the context of GBV prevention, response and coordination initiatives in humanitarian contexts. The study also sought to gather field perspectives on the state of GBV localization, and to examine the degree to which the global commitment to localization within the context of the humanitarian GBV sector has been operationalized.

Data was collected from a range of stakeholders participating in GBV coordination, including GBV Sub-Cluster Coordinators, representatives from local and/or women-led organizations, staff from national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) along with global leaders engaged in the localization debate. In line with the GBV AoR’s mandate, the primary focus of this study was on settings involving internally-displaced persons.

The final report is comprised of the following three documents:
- Summary Report (English, Arabic, French, Spanish, Bahasa, and Bengali)
- Full Report: The full report contains a detailed description of the study’s background, methodology, findings, and recommendations, and provides a comprehensive presentation of the data gathered through this research along with implications for future action. (Link here: http://www.careevaluations.org/evaluation/gbv-localization-mapping-study/)
- Appendix of Tools and Guidance: The appendix of tools and guidance serves as a companion document to both the summary and full versions of the report, and provides an overview of existing resource materials that have been developed pertaining to GBV localization. Read More...

Global Mapping Study on Gender Based Violence

Global Mapping Study on GBV. Led by CARE and ActionAid as co-leads of the task team the purpose of this study was to examine existing evidence around the issue of localization within the context of GBV prevention, response and coordination initiatives in humanitarian contexts. The study also sought to gather field perspectives on the state of GBV localization, and to examine the degree to which the global commitment to localization within the context of the humanitarian GBV sector has been operationalized.

Data was collected from a range of stakeholders participating in GBV coordination, including GBV Sub-Cluster Coordinators, representatives from local and/or women-led organizations, staff from national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) along with global leaders engaged in the localization debate. In line with the GBV AoR’s mandate, the primary focus of this study was on settings involving internally-displaced persons.

The final report is comprised of the following three documents:
- Summary Report (English, Arabic, French, Spanish, Bahasa, and Bengali)
- Full Report: The full report contains a detailed description of the study’s background, methodology, findings, and recommendations, and provides a comprehensive presentation of the data gathered through this research along with implications for future action. (Link here: http://www.careevaluations.org/evaluation/gbv-localization-mapping-study/)
- Appendix of Tools and Guidance: The appendix of tools and guidance serves as a companion document to both the summary and full versions of the report, and provides an overview of existing resource materials that have been developed pertaining to GBV localization. Read More...

GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE (GBV) LOCALIZATION: HUMANITARIAN TRANSFORMATION OR MAINTAINING THE STATUS QUO? – A GLOBAL STUDY ON GBV LOCALIZATION THROUGH COUNTRY-LEVEL GBV SUB-CLUSTERS

Gender-based violence (GBV) is one of the most prevalent human rights violations in the world, with an estimated one in three women experiencing physical or sexual abuse in her lifetime. Although humanitarian emergencies disproportionately impact women and girls, their needs and roles within the context of emergency response interventions are underrepresented.

The 2016 World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) and subsequent Grand Bargain commitments have set the localization agenda with the aim of improving local capacities while also providing additional aid directly to those most in need. Evidence suggests that engaging local actors is critical to the success of humanitarian interventions, leading to a faster, more effective, and more sustainable response (International Rescue Committee (IRC), 2017; Wall & Hedlund, 2016).1 In many cases, these benefits can be attributed to the fact that local actors have a greater understanding of the context, can often access affected populations more easily, and can navigate complex political and social dynamics more readily. These issues are particularly true with regard to the provision of GBV prevention and response initiatives, as the inclusion of local women and women-led organizations (WLOs) is crucial to effectively addressing issues of gender inequality and harmful social norms that contribute to the occurrence of GBV (IRC, 2017). Depending on the shape that humanitarian systems take, and the degree to which they foster women’s meaningful participation, emergencies can either be a catalyst for transformational change or exacerbate existing drivers of GBV.

Findings from this study suggest that GBV localization overall has been minimal, with a low level of perceived localization in three of the four priority contexts.4 Findings further suggest that localization has not been formally operationalized at the global level, making its effectiveness – or lack thereof – highly dependent on country contexts rather than relying on recognized standards of good practice. Respondents believe that localization efforts are often donor driven and only pay lip service to the inclusion of local actors rather than engaging in meaningful change. Read More...

SUMMARY REPORT: GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE LOCALIZATION: HUMANITARIAN TRANSFORMATION OR MAINTAINING THE STATUS QUO?

his study adopted a mixed methods approach, including an analysis of multiple quantitative data sources and 45 key informant interviews . In line with the GBV AoR’s mandate, the primary focus of this study was on settings with internally-displaced persons (IDPs). Four priority countries were identified as focal contexts for this research, including: Iraq, Nigeria, South Sudan, and the Whole of Syria/Turkey hub.

The researcher for this work collected data from a range of local and international actors participating in GBV coordination, including GBV Sub-Cluster coordinator(s) and representatives from civil society organizations (CSO), national non-governmental organizations (NNGOs), international non-governmental organizations (INGOs), and other global leaders engaged in the localization debate . The term local organization is used to refer to CSOs, NNGOS, and NGO consortiums and local women’s networks; it does not include national or local host government bodies . 10 For the purpose of this research, the terms CSO and NNGO are used interchangeably at the local level and reflect the self- reporting of respondents .
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