Regional/Global

Gender Gaps in COVID 19 Vaccines

COVID-19 vaccinations are quickly becoming a story of inequality. Gender inequality is a critical part of this story. In 16 countries where CARE has data, women are less likely to be vaccinated, and less likely to feel vaccines are safe.
There are massive local and global gaps in who can get vaccinated Only 1 9 of people in low income countries are vaccinated, and 79 of vaccinations have been in wealth countries Tragically, wealth and geography are just two factors that skew access to vaccines Another is gender In many low and middle income countries, women are less likely to get COVID-19 vaccines than men are This compounds gender inequality women are already facing in health and decision making Read More...

Our Best Shot: Frontline Health Workers and COVID-19 Vaccines

Fully realizing the social and economic benefits of halting COVID-19 requires investing in a fast and fair global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines. CARE estimates that for every $1 a country or donor government invests in vaccine doses, they need to invest $5.00 in delivering the vaccine.

Investments in frontline health workers are a critical component in this comprehensive vaccination cost. Of the $5.00 in delivery costs, $2.50 has to go to funding, training, equipping, and supporting health workers—especially women—who administer vaccines, run education campaigns, connect communities to health services, and build the trust required for patients to get vaccines. For these investments to work, they must pay, protect and respect women frontline health workers and their rights—a cost that is largely absent from recent WHO estimates on vaccine rollout costs. No current global conversations or guidance on vaccine costs includes the full cost of community health workers or long-term personnel costs.

Investing in a fast and fair global vaccine distribution will save twice as many lives as maximizing vaccine doses for the wealthiest countries in the world. Even better, investing in vaccine equality will speed up economic recoveries in every country in the world. For every $1 invested in vaccines in less wealthy countries, wealthy countries will see $4.80 of economic benefit because economies can fully re-open sooner. Failing to make this investment could cost wealthy economies $4.5 trillion in economic losses.

Current global debates are focused so narrowly on equitable access to for vaccine doses that they largely overlook the importance of delivering vaccines—and the key role women frontline health workers play in vaccine delivery. Of 58 global policy statements on vaccines, only 10 refer to the costs of delivery at all—and these are primarily technical advisories from the World Health Organization. No government donors are discussing the importance of vaccine delivery systems that are necessary to ending COVID-19. Only one statement—from Norway—refers to the importance of women health workers as part of the solution to ending COVID-19.

As new and dangerous strains of COVID-19 emerge in countries that are struggling to access the vaccine and control the pandemic, every day we wait for fair global vaccination allows for more contagious strains that spread around the world. The more chances the virus has to mutate in non-vaccinated populations, the higher the risk for everyone. Comprehensive global vaccine delivery plans that make sure the vaccine gets to people who need it—and that those people are ready to get the vaccine when it arrives—are the only way to end this threat. No one is safe until everyone is safe.
Read More...

Better Gender Outcomes in Food Assistance through Complementary and Multi-Modal Programing

With an objective of contributing to the knowledge base of promising practice using a combination of modalities to deliver food security and gender outcomes, this study reviews Food for Peace (FFP), DFSA (Development Food Security Activity), EFSP (Emergency Food Security Program), and OFDA projects that explicitly or implicitly incorporated gender-focused programming [55 pages]. Read More...

Working with Youth at Risk in the Balkans Case Study

Capturing 5 different models of working on prevention of radicalization and extremism in 5 countries in the Balkans capturing core impact elements on youth, parents, teachers, and other relevant stakeholders/community members that is developed by CARE and partners. (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) [52 pages]. Read More...

Covid-19 Digital Response Case Study

The case study captures and documents the process of YMI’s adaptation to the COVID-19 pandemic during the period March-July 2020 in countries in the Balkans (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) and represents a unique contribution and source for other organizations that are going through the same process of adaptation [38 pages]. Read More...

Scaling up Case Study How to Transform a Transformation

Captures the modalities of scaling up of CAREs gender transformative programming in high schools in Balkan countries (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) used by CARE and local partners [33 pages]. Read More...

Beyond Economic Empowerment The Influence of Savings Groups on Women’s Public Participation in Fragile and (post) Conflict-Affected Settings Every Voice Counts

Women’s meaningful participation and influence in public processes in fragile and (post) conflict-affected settings (FCAS) is not only necessary to achieve inclusive development but is a fundamental human right. Unfortunately, in most contexts, men are overrepresented in decision-making and women do not have equal voice in the decisions that affect their lives. Some evidence suggests that the economic empowerment of women opens up opportunities for them to participate in public decision-making processes. One such means for economic empowerment in FCAS is savings groups. Savings groups are small, community-based groups that can provide members a safe space to save money, take small loans, and make investment decisions. Globally, women have made advances in improving their income and access to savings, as well as increased their entrepreneurial endeavours as a result of their participation in savings groups. Research also shows that women’s participation in savings groups improves their confidence, skills, and ability to influence household decision-making. This prompts the question: do these benefits of women’s participation in savings groups extend into the public sphere? In other words, does women’s participation in savings groups influence their public participation1 and decision-making? Through a mixed methods investigation across five countries (18 villages) in Africa and South Asia (Burundi, Mali, Niger, Pakistan, and Sudan), using CARE’s Gender Empowerment Framework, this research investigated the differences in outcomes between women who participate in savings groups under three CARE programmes: Every Voice Counts (EVC), Women on the Move (WoM), and Latter Day Saints Charities (LDS) Recovery Support for Vulnerable Households programmes [74 pages]. Read More...

When Time Won’t Wait (Spanish, French, and Arabic)

Humanitarian crises can offer a ‘window of opportunity’ to transform unequal gender relations and shift harmful gender norms. Integration of gender into humanitarian programming ensures that the specific vulnerabilities, needs, capacities and priorities of women, girls, men and boys — related to pre-existing gender roles and inequalities, along with the impacts of the crisis — are recognised and addressed.
Sound gender analysis and programming from the outset is critical to effective crisis response in the short-term, and equitable and empowering societal change in the long-term. CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) approach and tool, developed during the humanitarian response in Syria in 2013, aims to drive a shift to locally driven and women-centered needs assessment which influences how needs are defined and responses are developed. The approach aims to provide essential information about gender roles and responsibilities, capacities, and vulnerabilities together with programming recommendations in situations where time is of the essence
and resources can be scarce. The ultimate goal of such an approach is to influence humanitarian response, program design and implementation to ensure that it supports not only the immediate needs of women and girls but also upholds their rights. CARE’s RGA has now been used in over 50 crises around the word and is featured as good practice in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s (IASC) Gender Handbook for Humanitarian Action. With rapidly increasing interest in and adoption of CARE’s RGA approach, discussion and questions continue as to whether increased awareness of gender, power and disaggregated data sets are translating into safer, more responsive, and effective aid.
To answer these questions, CARE commissioned an external evaluation to ‘provide an analysis of the effectiveness and influence of the RGA approach on adapting programming to improve gendered outcomes for crises-affected communities.’ The scope of the evaluation was global and focused on rapid gender analyses and related humanitarian programming over the period 2015-2020. These are executive summaries in Spanish, Arabic, and French. You can find the full report in English here: http://careevaluations.org/evaluation/when-time-wont-wait-cares-rapid-gender-analysis-approach-external-evaluation/ Read More...

Learning from Failure 2020

Part of striving for the deepest and most sustainable impact at the biggest scale possible is understanding what doesn’t work. CARE’s commitment not only to the highest quality programming, but also to continual improvement, drives us to celebrate our successes and to examine our failures. In 2019, CARE published our first Learning From Failure report, where we looked at what project evaluations told us was going wrong, and areas where we can strengthen our programming to improve our impact. By analyzing broader trends across several projects CARE can get a broader sense of systemic weaknesses that lead to failures in specific cases. We pair this with our podcast with individual case studies where we look at specific examples of failures and how to address them so we can illustrate trends with illustrative examples. That gives us the space to make bigger strategic changes to address underlying causes of failure and support teams to improve work at all levels. One example of this is targeting CARE’s investments in Monitoring Evaluation, Accountability, and Learning (MEAL) systems and capacity building to address common failures we found. In 2020, we repeated the analysis to see where we are improving, and where we still need work. Read More...

When Time Won’t Wait: CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis Approach External Evaluation

Humanitarian crises can offer a ‘window of opportunity’ to transform unequal gender relations and shift harmful gender norms. Integration of gender into humanitarian programming ensures that the specific vulnerabilities, needs, capacities and priorities of women, girls, men and boys — related to pre-existing gender roles and inequalities, along with the impacts of the crisis — are recognised and addressed.
Sound gender analysis and programming from the outset is critical to effective crisis response in the short-term, and equitable and empowering societal change in the long-term. CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) approach and tool, developed during the humanitarian response in Syria in 2013, aims to drive a shift to locally driven and women-centered needs assessment which influences how needs are defined and responses are developed. The approach aims to provide essential information about gender roles and responsibilities, capacities, and vulnerabilities together with programming recommendations in situations where time is of the essence
and resources can be scarce. The ultimate goal of such an approach is to influence humanitarian response, program design and implementation to ensure that it supports not only the immediate needs of women and girls but also upholds their rights. CARE’s RGA has now been used in over 50 crises around the word and is featured as good practice in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s (IASC) Gender Handbook for Humanitarian Action. With rapidly increasing interest in and adoption of CARE’s RGA approach, discussion and questions continue as to whether increased awareness of gender, power and disaggregated data sets are translating into safer, more responsive, and effective aid.
To answer these questions, CARE commissioned an external evaluation to ‘provide an analysis of the effectiveness and influence of the RGA approach on adapting programming to improve gendered outcomes for crises-affected communities.’ The scope of the evaluation was global and focused on rapid gender analyses and related humanitarian programming over the period 2015-2020. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all