South Sudan

BASELINE SURVEY REPORT WOMEN’S VOICES AND LEADERSHIP PROJECT (CENTRAL EQUATORIA, EASTERN EQUATORIA & JONGLEI STATES)

CARE South Sudan, with funding from Global Affairs Canada, implements the Women’s Voice and Leadership (WVL) project in the Eastern Equatorial, Central Equatorial and Jonglei states. WVL is a four-year project that supports the capacity and activities of local and national women-led organizations (WLO) seeking to empower women and girls, advance the protection of women and girls’ rights and achieve gender equality.
The baseline survey purposely informs the establishment of realistic and achievable targets and provides a point of reference against which progress on or towards the achievement of outcomes will be assessed, monitored and evaluated. This will also inform project implementation performance review process, maintain accountability by informing what difference the project is making and provide justification to the stakeholders for programme intervention. The study was also used to assess the political economy that underpins the operating environment for WLOs. The findings and recommendations of the baseline will help to provide strategic and operational guide to shape the implementation process. Read More...

THE EMERGENCY MOBILE HEALTH, NUTRITION & PROTECTION PROJECT IN EASTERN EQUATORIA, SOUTH SUDAN Final Evaluation

This report is presented by Adroit Consult International following a successful evaluation of the Emergency Mobile Health, Nutrition & Protection Project in Eastern Equatoria, South Sudan. This main objective of the endline evaluation was to provide information on the impact of the 3 year integrated Health, Nutrition and Gender Based Violence (GBV) project and also measure results at the outcome and impact levels. The evaluation was conducted with project stakeholders such as; Community leaders, Households of beneficiaries, Individual women and men, Children under five, Health workers, Government officials, CSO/NGO partners among others, and covered the areas of Lopa Lafon and Ikotos. The evaluation reached a total of 287 respondents in project implementation areas [27 pages]. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

Inequality and injustice: The deteriorating situation for women and girls in South Sudan’s war

This progressive gender analysis is based on a number of CARE’s rapid gender analyses in South Sudan conducted since December 2013 and focuses on gender-based violence. CARE's rapid gender analyses are designed as an incremental process: as more information about gender relations during the current crisis in South Sudan becomes available, the progressive gender analysis will be updated. It is hoped that this document will provide support for CARE staff members and other INGOs to ensure that the needs of women, men, boys and girls are taken into account as the humanitarian response continues to develop. Read More...

GenCAP/CARE Rapid Gender Analysis: Unity State, South Sudan

Women’s lives have only gotten worse following the political and inter-communal violence that has shaken South Sudan to its core since mid-December 2013i. Women have been raped and killed where they had sought shelter, including hospitals and churchesii. In April 2014, fighting in Unity State caused more than 20,000 people from throughout the state to seek refuge in Protection of Civilian centres in Bentiu: the biggest movement of people since the current crisis began. There has been relatively little analysis about the different needs of women, men, boys and girls during the current crisis in Unity.

Rapid gender analysis provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls in a crisis by examining the relationships between women, men, boys and girls. For the moment, this is only an incomplete, initial analysis of gender relations in Bentiu PoC area. Nevertheless the initial gender analysis and recommendations for more gender sensitive programming should inform programming to make sure we meet the needs and protect women, men, boys and girls. Read More...

No Simple Solutions: Women, displacement and durable solutions in South Sudan

Conversations surrounding returns and relocations in South Sudan and the future of the POC sites are often framed around clear-cut distinctions between single push and pull factors. This framing – often based on the perceptions of international actors of what internally displaced people (IDPs) or refugees do or should think – ignores the fact that decisions to stay or to move are made based on complex motivations in contexts of high uncertainty and, especially for women, limited information. This report seeks to bring the perceptions and experiences of displaced and returned South Sudanese women to the forefront of conversations around durable solutions, and further convey the complexities of the current context. Read More...

Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships-Endline Report

Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships was implemented in four focus countries: Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan, with an aim to change the way international NGOs work in partnership with local and national NGOs in humanitarian action, so that these partnerships support the move towards localisation and ultimately reach those affected by crises more effectively and efficiently. The programme was guided by national steering committees (NSC) and existing NGO Fora in each of the focus countries and managed by a consortium of 6 INGOs: Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD, Oxfam who have worked together for several years to look at partnerships and localisation through the Missed Opportunities series of reports and research1.

This report presents the data collected from end of project - ‘endline’ - surveys completed across all four target countries, and for those based internationally, between September – November 2019. Read More...

Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships: South Sudan

This research was commissioned by the Accelerating Localisation Through Partnerships programme – a multi-agency consortium programme funded by the European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid department (ECHO) over two years (2017-2019) – to establish what operational elements of partnerships between local, national and international NGOs are most likely to foster localisation of humanitarian action. The research was underpinned by a mixed methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data collection approaches. In-depth consultations were conducted in three locations across South Sudan to reach a varied sample of local and national actors: Wau, Bor, and Juba City. In total, 96 NGOs were consulted for this research in South Sudan; 85% of which were local or national NGOs. The findings reflect experiences from a rich diversity of local and national NGOs in South Sudan and provide valuable insights that can assist humanitarian organisations in ensuring partnership practices accelerate localisation of humanitarian action. Findings are also relevant for those funding humanitarian response, in particular signatories of the Grand Bargain. Read More...

Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships-A Learning Review

The Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships programme is an ECHO- funded programme, which has been implemented for two years (Nov 2017 – Oct 2019) in four countries: Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. Christian Aid leads the consortium of 6 INGOs (Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD and Oxfam); in each country, programme implementation has been guided by a National Steering Committee (NSC), made up of local and national NGOs and the consortium members.

This Learning Review constitutes the final output of the programme and is meant to assess its effectiveness and impact, and more broadly to capture learning for the consortium members and humanitarian stakeholders in the four programme countries and beyond. While a follow-on programme, Phase 2, is yet to be confirmed or funded, this review will support the design of any such programme.
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ENHANCING THE FOOD SECURITY AND LIVELIHOODS COPING MECHANISMS FOR CONFLICT AFFECTED COMMUNITIES IN IMOTONG STATE

CARE South Sudan has been operating in the former Eastern Equatoria State (now Imotong State) since 2015. Since fiscal year to 2017 to 2018, CARE South Sudan, received funds from SDC to support improve the resilience capacity of food insecure and conflict affected communities of Torit County and Pageri Administrative Area of Imotong State, South Sudan. The project was aimed to improve the food security, livelihoods, gender relations at household level and peaceful coexistence among 2,900 households (approximately 17,400 individuals). The target Bomas of the project Fodofodo, Ifuanyak, Nyong and Ilangi in Nyong Payam; Moti/Enyif in Ifwotu Payam in Torit County. Abila, Anzara and Rei in Nimule Payam and Avumadria, Masindi, Bilinya and Gandzi in Mugali Payam of Pageri County. Read More...

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