South Sudan

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

Inequality and injustice: The deteriorating situation for women and girls in South Sudan’s war

This progressive gender analysis is based on a number of CARE’s rapid gender analyses in South Sudan conducted since December 2013 and focuses on gender-based violence. CARE's rapid gender analyses are designed as an incremental process: as more information about gender relations during the current crisis in South Sudan becomes available, the progressive gender analysis will be updated. It is hoped that this document will provide support for CARE staff members and other INGOs to ensure that the needs of women, men, boys and girls are taken into account as the humanitarian response continues to develop. Read More...

GenCAP/CARE Rapid Gender Analysis: Unity State, South Sudan

Women’s lives have only gotten worse following the political and inter-communal violence that has shaken South Sudan to its core since mid-December 2013i. Women have been raped and killed where they had sought shelter, including hospitals and churchesii. In April 2014, fighting in Unity State caused more than 20,000 people from throughout the state to seek refuge in Protection of Civilian centres in Bentiu: the biggest movement of people since the current crisis began. There has been relatively little analysis about the different needs of women, men, boys and girls during the current crisis in Unity.

Rapid gender analysis provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls in a crisis by examining the relationships between women, men, boys and girls. For the moment, this is only an incomplete, initial analysis of gender relations in Bentiu PoC area. Nevertheless the initial gender analysis and recommendations for more gender sensitive programming should inform programming to make sure we meet the needs and protect women, men, boys and girls. Read More...

No Simple Solutions: Women, displacement and durable solutions in South Sudan

Conversations surrounding returns and relocations in South Sudan and the future of the POC sites are often framed around clear-cut distinctions between single push and pull factors. This framing – often based on the perceptions of international actors of what internally displaced people (IDPs) or refugees do or should think – ignores the fact that decisions to stay or to move are made based on complex motivations in contexts of high uncertainty and, especially for women, limited information. This report seeks to bring the perceptions and experiences of displaced and returned South Sudanese women to the forefront of conversations around durable solutions, and further convey the complexities of the current context. Read More...

Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships-Endline Report

Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships was implemented in four focus countries: Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan, with an aim to change the way international NGOs work in partnership with local and national NGOs in humanitarian action, so that these partnerships support the move towards localisation and ultimately reach those affected by crises more effectively and efficiently. The programme was guided by national steering committees (NSC) and existing NGO Fora in each of the focus countries and managed by a consortium of 6 INGOs: Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD, Oxfam who have worked together for several years to look at partnerships and localisation through the Missed Opportunities series of reports and research1.

This report presents the data collected from end of project - ‘endline’ - surveys completed across all four target countries, and for those based internationally, between September – November 2019. Read More...

Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships: South Sudan

This research was commissioned by the Accelerating Localisation Through Partnerships programme – a multi-agency consortium programme funded by the European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid department (ECHO) over two years (2017-2019) – to establish what operational elements of partnerships between local, national and international NGOs are most likely to foster localisation of humanitarian action. The research was underpinned by a mixed methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data collection approaches. In-depth consultations were conducted in three locations across South Sudan to reach a varied sample of local and national actors: Wau, Bor, and Juba City. In total, 96 NGOs were consulted for this research in South Sudan; 85% of which were local or national NGOs. The findings reflect experiences from a rich diversity of local and national NGOs in South Sudan and provide valuable insights that can assist humanitarian organisations in ensuring partnership practices accelerate localisation of humanitarian action. Findings are also relevant for those funding humanitarian response, in particular signatories of the Grand Bargain. Read More...

Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships-A Learning Review

The Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships programme is an ECHO- funded programme, which has been implemented for two years (Nov 2017 – Oct 2019) in four countries: Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. Christian Aid leads the consortium of 6 INGOs (Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD and Oxfam); in each country, programme implementation has been guided by a National Steering Committee (NSC), made up of local and national NGOs and the consortium members.

This Learning Review constitutes the final output of the programme and is meant to assess its effectiveness and impact, and more broadly to capture learning for the consortium members and humanitarian stakeholders in the four programme countries and beyond. While a follow-on programme, Phase 2, is yet to be confirmed or funded, this review will support the design of any such programme.
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ENHANCING THE FOOD SECURITY AND LIVELIHOODS COPING MECHANISMS FOR CONFLICT AFFECTED COMMUNITIES IN IMOTONG STATE

CARE South Sudan has been operating in the former Eastern Equatoria State (now Imotong State) since 2015. Since fiscal year to 2017 to 2018, CARE South Sudan, received funds from SDC to support improve the resilience capacity of food insecure and conflict affected communities of Torit County and Pageri Administrative Area of Imotong State, South Sudan. The project was aimed to improve the food security, livelihoods, gender relations at household level and peaceful coexistence among 2,900 households (approximately 17,400 individuals). The target Bomas of the project Fodofodo, Ifuanyak, Nyong and Ilangi in Nyong Payam; Moti/Enyif in Ifwotu Payam in Torit County. Abila, Anzara and Rei in Nimule Payam and Avumadria, Masindi, Bilinya and Gandzi in Mugali Payam of Pageri County. Read More...

Enhancing holistic emergency GBV prevention, response and mitigation intervention in conflict affected communities in South Sudan

This report provides an independent evaluation of the project on Enhancing Holistic Emergency GBV Prevention, Response and Mitigation Interventions in Conflict Affected Communities of South Sudan. A UNICEF supported Gender and Protection Project in Twic East and Duk Counties of Jonglie State. The overall objective of the project was to ensure that vulnerable women and girls have increased access to life saving multi-sectoral GBV response and prevention services. The project was implemented by Care in South Sudan with funding from UNICEF. This was an emergency response project with a specific focus on GBV case management and psychosocial support. The project had a survivors’ centered approach as an integral part of the response to GBV incidents. The gender progress assessment focused on the effectiveness including Knowledge Attitudes and Practices (KAP) towards GBV, efficiency, the potential impact and sustainability and lessons learnt from the GBV and protection program in Jonglei.
The evaluation used both quantitative and qualitative methods. The primary data collection methods included: (i) Questionnaire administered to 150 households in Panyogor, Kongor Nyuak, Pakeer in Twic East and Ageer in Duk. (ii) Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) with key stakeholders such as: the Department Relief and Rehabilitation commissioner, health, justice, protection, women leaders and Care Staff. (iii) Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were conducted with project beneficiaries (women, men, boys and girls). FGDs with 12 participants each were conducted in each of the five sites - two FGDs for girls, two for women, one for boys and also for men; (iv) relevant documents were reviewed for triangulation purposes. In total, 531 respondents participated in the GBV assessment including 21 key informants, 360 FGD participants and 150 household heads. Read More...

Addressing Root Causes Project in South Sudan

The Addressing Root Causes (ARC) project that started in September 2016, aims at tackling the root causes of armed conflict, instability and irregular migration in South Sudan by increasing community resilience to conflict-related and economically-induced shocks in 19 payams in Jonglei state in the counties of Pibor, Twic East, Duk and Bor. The project has distinguished three outcomes areas: Economic Resilience, Peaceful Conflict Resolution and Social Cohesion which are expected to be mutually reinforcing and when all are combined and stregthened together, the beneficial effects will contribute to more resilience and a culture of peace.
This mid-term review was conducted to assess the progress of project implementation since September 2016, and document best practices and lessons learned to inform key stakeholders on future activity design, programming, and implementation. Primary data was collected using household survey, key Informant Interviews and Focus Group Discussions with the targeted communities. Combined with the FGD, a Social Norm Analysis Plot (SNAP) framework was applied as it was considered best suited to measure changes in social (gender) norms.
Key findings from review indicate access to loans and training of VSLA groups is empowering women and youth in the targeted communities to engage in IGAs and micro-enterprises, thereby broadening their livelihood and resilience options and creating market linkages with traders across different ethnic communities. Further, more women and youth reported being confident to participate in economic opportunities and possess relevant tools and skills; and the role of women and youth is being appreciated in contributing to meeting household needs, thereby reflecting the conflict and gender transformation in the targeted communities. It should however be noted that more VSLAs have been formed and are engaged in IGAs and micro-enterprises in Duk and Twic East compared to Bor and Pibor.
Also, peace committees are appreciated and recognized by the targeted communities for facilitating and using peaceful mechanisms to mitigate and resolve intra and – inter community conflict and reconcile past grievances. Most project beneficiaries also reported increased collaboration with each other, and feel have more positive relationships and trust within and beyond their community. Read More...

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