Gender Assessment

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Lebanon May 2020

On February 23rd, Lebanon reported its first COVID-19 positive case. On March 16th the Lebanese authorities responded in a promptly manner by declaring a state of general mobilization and encouraging citizens to observe physical distancing. At the same time the newly formed government adopted a series of measures including movement restriction, curfews, shop closure the temporary suspension of flights. The virus was identified on January 8, 2020 and has since spread to 210 countries, infecting more than 5.33 million people and caused fatalities all around the globe. As of June 16th, Lebanon counts 1,446 COVID-19 positive cases.

The Covid-19 pandemic in Lebanon is a crisis within a crisis. It occurred during a broader socio-economic meltdown that has shaken the country in recent months. In October 2019, Lebanese occupied the streets in various cities across the country demonstrating against corruption, unemployment and sectarianism in the country. Lebanon appears to have responded effectively to the pandemic so far, a number of major challenges await it. With little measures to mitigate the economic impact of the confinement and protesters pushing to return to the streets, the country is entering a challenging era with a major impact on people’s lives; refugees (about 1,5 million) and host communities. It is imperative that measures that address the different needs of women, men, children and youth with particular attention to underlying vulnerabilities of certain groups including displaced people, refugee populations and migrant workers should be adopted in a comprehensive and coordinated way.

The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) intends to highlight how COVID-19 in the context of the socio-economic crisis impacts differently women, girls, boys and men and recommend measures to address and mitigate risks related to the protection and wellbeing of affected population. The RGA is looking into the following areas of interest:

• Gender roles and responsibilities
• Decision making, participation and leadership
• Health, mental health and SRHR
• Access to services and resources
• Safety and Protection
• Access to information and technology
• Capacities and coping mechanisms Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Mopti Mali April 2020

The ongoing crisis in Mali has led to levels of socioeconomic disruption and displacement at an unprecedented scale. There are numerous factors that contribute to aggravate/worsen the situation - political crises, decades of drought, structural food insecurity, climate change, high rates of poverty, and high rates of youth unemployment. In many areas traditional livelihoods have been usurped by political conflict or by drought, causing extremely high rates of displacement and food insecurity. Since 2017 there have been significant increases in violent attacks and rates of displacement, and the crisis continues to grow in scope and scale into 2020 (OCHA 2020).
The first few months of 2020 saw escalating violence and conflict, leading to a sharp rise in internal displacements, the continued disruption of markets, and a deterioration in the supply of basic social services. The results from the recent food and nutrition security analysis (Cadre Harmonisé, November 2019) indicate that from October to December 2019, 648,330 people are estimated to be food insecure – representing an increase of 250 percent compared to the same time last year (WFP 2020).
Mali is a highly patriarchal society, with institutionalized gender inequality that marginalizes women. The effects of the crisis have not affected all equally, and there is significant evidence that there are significant differences, with the resources, rights, and afforded to women, men, boys, girls, and other groups of individuals, requiring different coping strategies. High levels of diversity in ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and circumstance within communities bring about important intersections between power and vulnerability that further prioritize and marginalize certain individuals. As the crisis in Mali continues to rapidly evolve, it is critical to ensure that humanitarian interventions are designed to respond to the needs of women, men, boys, girls, people with disabilities, and other vulnerable groups.
To better understand the experiences of women, men, boys within this highly dynamic and rapidly evolving crisis, CARE Mali conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis in March 2020, with the objective of analysing and understanding how the insecurity and conflict in the Mopti region has influenced women, men, girls, boys, people with disabilities, and other specific groups; as well as to identify and propose solutions to limitations women face to full participation in decision making; and to provide practical advice to decision-making to improve gender integration in humanitarian response programming and planning. Of key importance was the generation of recommendations to the Harande program, a USAID Food for Peace program being led by CARE and implemented in the Mopti region from 2015-2020. Read More...

CARE Zimbabwe Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID-19

Zimbabwe has not been spared by the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID 19). The coronavirus was first detected in Wuhan, the capital city in the Hubei province of China in December 2019. The disease has since spread to every corner of the world causing serious health and socio-economic challenges. As of 31st May, Zimbabwe had recorded 174 confirmed cases and 4 deaths.
CARE carried out a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) to assess the immediate and anticipated adverse impacts of COVID-19 on men, women, boys and girls. The assessment was conducted in geographical areas where CARE is implementing its portfolio of development including food security and nutrition, WASH, education, resilience and humanitarian programs. A qualitative methodology was applied and primary data was collected through key informant interviews, and supplemented by a desk review. Primary data was collected remotely using phones and emails. The team could not go on the ground due to the introduction of a COVID -19 national lockdown that initiated on the 30th of March 2020, and also in compliance with WHO and organisational guidelines on the prevention of the spread of coronavirus Read More...

Northeast Nigeria Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19

Even before the impact of the COVID- 19 pandemic, the crisis in Northeast Nigeria is one of the most severe in the world today. In the 3 most affected states in 2020, 7.9 million out of 13 million people needed humanitarian assistance—up 11% from 2019. 79% of the displaced people are women and children.
Compounding this crisis, by July 2, 2020, Nigeria reported 26,484 cases and 603 deaths—a dramatic growth in cases over the month of June. While men make up 68% of the cases, women are bearing a higher burden of mobility restrictions, economic loss, and restricted access to services.
This Rapid Gender Analysis reviewed secondary data and conducted interviews with 109 people between May 6th and May 21st, 2020 in the three Northeast states of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe where UN Women, CARE International and Oxfam operate. Read More...

COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis Global Trends June 2020

In the three months since CARE released its first Rapid Gender Analysis of COVID-19, the situation has evolved quickly and spread globally. CARE has continued to closely monitor this situation, by conducting context-specific analyses in 5 regions covering 64 countries. This has included conversations and data collection with more than 4,500 women.
This new analysis confirms the initial findings and predictions of the first analysis. It also reveals new areas of high priority for women and girls—and for men and boys—as the crisis deepens. Our recent research reveals:
• The highest immediate priorities 3 months into the crisis are food, income, and rights—including concerns around Gender Based Violence, caregiving burdens, and mobility. Women and girls show these needs most acutely, but they also rise to the top of men and boys’ priorities in COVID-19.
• Women’s burdens are increasing. As frontline workers in the health system, as survivors of Gender Based Violence, as the people primarily responsible for food, cleaning, and childcare—especially with schools closed, women confirm that their burdens are rising, and so is the stress around them.
• Women are displaying remarkable leadership, but are still unable to access most decision-making, around COVID-19 and around daily life. They are also quickly approaching the end of their safety nets.
In this context, this document provides updated recommendations to focus on lessening the immediate impact on women and providing the chance to build back equal. These recommendations cluster around:
• Urgently addressing top priorities of food, income, and rights by expanding safety nets—both in the immediate response and in long-term ways for all people to provide their own food and livelihoods.
• Reducing women’s burdens by providing extra support for caregiving, services for GBV prevention and response, and investing in women healthcare workers.
• Prioritizing women’s leadership by creating space for women leaders at all levels of the response, and consistently listening to women’s perspectives and data as the crisis evolves.
Read More...

Indonesia Rapid Gender Assessment in Response to COVID-19

Following the first reported COVID-19 case in Indonesia, Yayasan CARE Peduli (YCP) had immediately started to prepare its response package to support communities in areas where it operates. Given the mobility restriction, it had been quite challenging to prepare the response package particularly in preceding the response with much more detailed field-based needs assessment. This Rapid Gender Assessment (RGA) was prepared almost simultaneously with the delivery of the first stage of the response. While it has been limited in its use for the first stage response, it is intended to guide YCP’s next stage of response which will be aimed at mitigating the social economic impact of COVID-19, emphasizing the needs of women and access to the support. This RGA will serve as the basis for further in-depth study or assessment to support detailed design of the support schemes and other assessments that other development partners are planning to undertake.
Information on the local situation and needs were gathered from the projects’ database and information from the local governments and partners. Therefore, the first stage of YCP’s response consist of preventive and protective measures from the virus transmission which was aimed at the communities in general.
Specifically, the RGA has the following objectives:
1. To analyze the impact of COVID-19 and the needs of the communities especially the vulnerable groups such as women and children, the elderlies, people with disabilities and other vulnerabilities;
2. To inform the design of COVID-19 response based on the identified needs of the different groups, focusing on: (i) paid and unpaid productive works; (ii) gender relations and decision-making process; (iii) basic services; (iv) safety and security with respect to gender-based violence; (v) influence of faith and religion; (vi) access to information and technology; (vii) WASH and livelihood; and (viii) child protection and education. Read More...

Iraq COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis

As of June 2020, Iraq is experiencing drastic increase in the number of people who contracted COVID-19 compared to the preceding months. With the everchanging context of COVID-19, women, girls, men and boys in Iraq have been affected differently; and they developed different coping mechanisms. Furthermore, their roles within households have been directly impacted by the crisis, and their participation and access to services also have reflected the gendered dynamics of the COVID-19. There has been an increase in the protection and gender-based violence risks identified and reported, and women and girls are disproportionately affected by these risks. Read More...

Vietnam Rapid Gender Analysis May 2020

Vietnam reported its first known case of COVID-19 on 23 January 2020. As of 19 May, the country had 324 confirmed cases, with 263 recoveries and no deaths.
In Vietnam, COVID-19 presents a range of contextual challenges including high numbers of migrant workers, high numbers of employees in the garment industry, many people working in the informal sector, and linguistically and culturally diverse ethnic minorities. The impacts of COVID-19 on vulnerable groups, such as migrant workers, informal workers, garment factory workers, and ethnic minorities are further marginalising these groups, exacerbating poverty and inequality and increasing their exposure to other social, economic and protection risks.
Women in Vietnam have historically been underrepresented in public decision-making processes, a trend that is reflected in high-level decision-making structures on COVID-19. This means that even as women are disproportionately affected by the crisis, they have less say in how their country should respond to it. Read More...

Myanmar COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis

As of 7 June 2020, there have been 228 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Myanmar,1 and new cases continue to be confirmed.2 Myanmar’s humanitarian and conflict dynamics, high poverty rate, flow of returning migrants, high numbers of internally displaced people and urban slum-dwellers, and high proportion of workers in the informal sector present a range of challenges in the context of COVID-19. These factors tend to make prevention and control measures more difficult, while also intensifying the potential impacts of a larger outbreak, if it were to occur.
Despite the relatively low number of verified cases within its borders to date, the pandemic has already had an outsized economic impact in Myanmar. Migrant workers, informal sector workers including sex workers, and garment sector workers have all been disproportionately affected. Women in Myanmar have traditionally been under-represented in public decision-making processes, a trend which is continuing in structures established to respond to COVID-19. This means that even as women are disproportionately affected by the crisis, they have less say in how their communities and country respond to it, increasing the risk of a COVID-19 response that does not adequately address the needs and priorities of the most vulnerable women and girls. Read More...

Final Project Evaluation of Women, Peace and Security (WPS) – Afghanistan

The Women, Peace and Security (WPS) project aimed to support the Kabul Women Association (KWA) with the four objectives of: 1) Support Kabul Women Association (KWA) to ensure that it is a well-functioning association, 2) KWA contributes to the increased protection, prevention and response for women’s rights issues, 3) KWA is participating in decision-making processes regarding the implementation of the National Action Plan (NAP) for the Women of Afghanistan (NAPWA) 2008-19; and 4) KWA members have increased economic independence through improve financial skills and access to financial services to start income generating activities. The WPS project was implemented in two provincial districts and seven municipality districts of Kabul province.

The WPS final project evaluation had followed the below rationale and helps to draw out the following:
- This will help generate knowledge from the project and to provide assessment of the processes and achievements made and draw the lessons learnt
- To the extent possible, the relevant results of this evaluation will act as the baseline for the next phase of the project (GEWEP III)
- This evaluation particularly provides results on the two periods of the project (2015-2018 and 2018-2020)
- It provides understanding of what has worked and what has not that can guide future planning

The WPS Final Evaluation collected data on the four outcomes listed under the WPS project results framework which are listed below:
- Outcome 1: The Kabul Women’s Association (KWA) is a well-functioning association
- Outcome 2: KWA contributes to the increased protection, prevention and response for
women’s rights issues
- Outcome 3: KWA is participating in decision-making processes regarding the
implementation of the National Action Plan (NAP) for the Women of Afghanistan
(NAPWA) 2008-2019
- Outcome 4: KWA members have expanded their income opportunities, strengthened
their economic independence and continue to participate in women rights advocacy activities
Read More...

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