Gender Assessment

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE GENDERED EFFECTS OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC ON HOUSEHOLDS

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is arguably one of the biggest pandemics to hit the world in recent times. It began in Wuhan, China and within a span of a few months took a toll on all the countries. A pandemic of such magnitude was witnessed when the 1918 flue pandemic started in Europe, spreading to United States of America, Asia and later to the rest of the world. Globally, the pandemic has affected the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Governments across the world, including Kenya, have taken up different containment measures including introduction of economic stimulus programs to cushion women and men, girls and boys and the economy at large, from the devastating effects of the pandemic. In Kenya, the pandemic and its associated containment measures resulted in unprecedented effects on the country’s economic and social outcomes such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and people’s well-being with a disproportionate burden falling on women and girls. This report analyses the gendered socio-economic effects of COVID-19 and provides policy recommendations that will guide responses, interventions and recovery plans for COVID-19 in Kenya. Specifically, the report assesses the effect of COVID-19 on: incomes including remittances; food security; education; unpaid care and domestic work; access to healthcare services; access to sexual and reproductive health services; access to social protection; access to water and sanitation services; gender-based violence (GBV) due to restrictions associated with COVID-19, and the prevention and response mechanisms. The analysis in this report is informed by primary data collected from a sample of 2,587 individuals from all the 47 counties in Kenya between 4th August and 8th September 2020 using Computer Assisted Telephonic Interviews (CATI). Due to the sensitivity of GBV information and the need to uphold the privacy of respondents in the survey, a separate SMS-based survey was conducted. Two questionnaires were administered to a sample of 2,482 individuals drawn across all the 47 counties in Kenya. The same individuals were interviewed at different times with the duration of each interview lasting not longer than 20 minutes. A total of 34 Key Informant Interviews (KIIs), that is 19 women and 15 men, were conducted from both State and non-State actors to complement and triangulate the findings from the individual/ household data while drawing more insights on the effects and recovery plans from the pandemic. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Sofala – Beira

On the 23rd of January 2021 Tropical Cyclone Eloise made its landfall, in central Mozambique.. Over 441,686 people were affected, with 43,327 persons being displaced (the Instituto Nacional de Gestão Reduçãodo Risco de Desastres (INGD).) The storm also destroyed farmland, infrastructure and thousands of homes. Most of the areas hit by Cyclone Eloise were the same areas affected by Cyclone Idai less than two years ago and hit by tropical storm Chalane on 30 December 2020. CARE conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis from the 12th to the 18th of February in three of the affected districts in Sofala Province, Beira (with the focus on Inhamizua, IFAPA accommodation center, and Chipangara) Nhamatanda (with focus on Tica, and Jhon Segredo Accommodation center), and Buzi (with focus on Guara-Guara), at the transit centers, resettlement sites, and catchment areas. About 56 364 houses were totally or partially destroyed, others flooded, forcing some families to shelter with host families. Others families had been evacuated from flooded areas and were staying in crowded temporary accommodation. Those that were staying in accommodation centers had lost most of their resources, and were dependent on government for daily provision. Read More...

RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS ON THE IMPACT OF THE CORONAVIRUS ON GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN FOUR DISTRICTS OF ZAMBIA

Pandemics and outbreaks have differential impacts on women, men, girls and boys. From risk of exposure and biological susceptibility to infection to the social and economic implications, individuals’ experiences are likely to vary according to their biological and gender characteristics and their interaction with other social determinants (UNWomen, 2020). Because of this, global and national strategic plans for COVID-19 preparedness and response must be grounded in strong gender analysis and must ensure meaningful participation of affected groups, including women and girls, in decision-making and implementation.

The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) was conducted in the four districts of Lusaka, Kalomo, Mpika, and Katete. A mixed method approach was employed to gather data from men, women, boys and girls on the impact of Covid-19 on Gender Based Violence (GBV), health, nutrition and water, sanitation and hygiene. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis MENA – Turkey Program

In an effort to understand the differentiated needs and capacities of the vulnerable Syrian refugee groups affected by the Syrian Crisis residing in Southeast Turkey, CARE updated its Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) conducted in 2019. Turkey hosts the largest share of refugees in the world; 90% of whom are Syrian and have relocated to Turkey since the beginning of the Syrian crisis. A high majority (98%) of the Syrian refugees are residing in urban areas and many face difficulties in meeting their basic needs and adopt negative coping mechanisms such as early marriage, child labor, and illegal employment. Harmful cultural and traditional practices, coupled with the lack of livelihoods and self-reliance opportunities, perpetuate a situation of risk as many families see child marriage as the only way to secure a future for their children.
CARE continues to work to strengthen capacities, to provide targeted protection assistance, including in preventing and responding to GBV, providing protection responses including assessing legal and other specialized services and ensuring families have reduced exposure to safety and security concerns. The assistance provide would be more effective with having gender-based needs and capacities identified and addressed throughout the intervention. To analyze the gendered dimension of the Syrian Crisis in Turkey and update its 2019 RGA data on the changing roles of women, men, girls and boys as well as their needs, capacities and coping strategies, CARE conducted 396 household surveys, 3 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and a review of secondary data. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis North West Syria-Idleb

This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping mechanisms of women, men, boys and girls living in Idleb Governorate. Idleb has long been a safe haven for hundreds of thousands of internally displaced people (IDP) since the early years of the Syrian conflict. The growing population of IDPs overstretched the already limited capacity of the governorate. Since 1 December 2019, almost one million people were forced to flee from their homes to escape from the violence and four out of five people who have been displaced are women, girls or boys.
1 Humanitarian workers in the field raised concerns over the effects of the current situation on women and children, due to displacement, crowded living conditions, the lack of privacy, exploitation, and other factors.
2 Women and girls are disproportionately affected by humanitarian crises due to the exacerbation of already existing gender inequalities and vulnerabilities. An inclusive, effective and successful humanitarian response should understand and address different needs, vulnerabilities, capacities and coping mechanisms of women, men, girls and boys.
For this purpose CARE conducted three Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) in 2014, 2018 and 2019 in North West Syria. The fieldwork of the last RGA was completed in August 2019 and the report was finalized in December 2019. However, as the situation deteriorated after heavy airstrikes and shelling targeted Idleb in mid-December, CARE decided to conduct a new RGA to better understand and respond to the evolving crisis. The objectives of this RGA are to inform program activities and procedures, including how to better target women and girls in ways that are safe, equitable, and empowering within the local context and develop a set of actionable recommendations for the different sectors based on key findings. The RGA used a CARE RGA3 methodology. It included a household survey of 396 participants: 186 women and 210 men. Read More...

Addressing Gender-Based Sexual Harassment in the Workplace in Vietnam and Cambodia

Purpose: This final evaluation aims to build an impact assessment of the sexual harassment prevention (SHP) package in the targeted suppliers of Primark in Vietnam. In particular, the final evaluation aims to assess the appropriateness and the effectiveness of interventions of the SHP package and review the possibility and lesson learnt to scale up the SHP intervention to other suppliers of Primark in Vietnam.

Methods: The study employed a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods. Regarding qualitative methods, the study organised and collected information from 2 focus group discussions (FGD) with the Sexual Harassment Committee (SHPC) members, 6 in-depth-Interview with leaders and workers, the four most significant change stories and a program reflection workshop. The quantitative method was a survey with a sample of 196 employees working in the targeted factories. [76 pages]

Main findings: The intervention package of the project had 3 major domains of activities which included training and advocacy to leaders and managers of the factories participating in the project on SHP, supporting the factories to develop and implement SHP mechanisms, and awareness-raising and behaviour change campaigns. The project’s activities that focus on training and advocacy for the targeted factories’ leaders and managers had promoted them to proactively participate in address sexual harassment in their factories. The factory management board had publicly shown their commitment to implement the established SH prevention policies and actively participating in implementing all the project activities and creating role models at the forefront of good practice performance. Also, the findings of this evaluation show significant improvements in behaviours and the capacities of SHPC members and resource persons regarding implementing SHP activities and SH case handling. Read More...

Gendered Violence Research Network: Enhancing Women’s Voice to STOP Sexual Harassment Final Evaluation – Vietnam

CARE Australia, through its partner CARE Country Offices (COs), has been working to prevent and address the issue of sexual harassment in mainland Southeast Asia’s garment sector since 2017. STOP is funded by CARE Australia and the Australian Government through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP) and the Gender Action Platform (GAP).

STOP is aligned with CARE International’s organisational remit of working in gender transformative ways to cultivate gender equality and justice and uses an adapted version of the World Health Organisation’s ‘socio-ecological model of violence prevention.

STOP’s key objectives can be summarised as follows:
1. To support garment factories in developing effective workplace mechanisms to respond to sexual harassment.
2. To make female garment factory workers feel safe enough to report sexual harassment, and through engagement with garment factories, enable them to do so without negative consequences.
3. To strengthen the national regulatory environment to promote laws, policies and mechanisms to address sexual harassment in the workplace. STOP works with participating factories to implement STOP’s Workplace Sexual Harassment Prevention Package (WSHPP) to create workplaces where female workers feel safe and experience less sexual harassment. This is achieved using a ‘social norms approach’ at the individual, factory, and societal levels. [32 pages] Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Um Rakuba Camp and Tunaydbah Settlement, Eastern Sudan April 2021

Since 9 November 2020, Ethiopian and Eritrean asylum seekers have been arriving in Eastern Sudan, fleeing a military escalation in the Tigray region in northern Ethiopia. Eastern Sudan is facing multiple challenges including high levels of food insecurity, flood recovery, increased militarisation on the Sudan and Ethiopia border, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic and the impacts of mitigation and containment measures. As of 17th April (latest situation report), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Government’s Commissioner for Refugees (COR) registered 62,850 individuals who have crossed the border into Eastern Sudan. It is estimated that 36% of the arrivals are female and 64% are male. Further estimations show that 27% of the arrivals are children (0-17years); out of which 8% are below 5 years. Elderly (+60years) comprise 4% and Adults (18-59 years) 69% of the arrivals. Of those who arrived, data as of January 2021, showed 15,056 are women and girls of reproductive age and 1,365 currently pregnant women. Primary data collection, through FGDs, KIIs and Individual Stories, took place between 16-18th February 2021, in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement.

RGA objectives were to:
• Better understand, the main needs, priorities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys,
as well as at-risk groups in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement
• Identify how CARE and the wider humanitarian community can adapt and design targeted services
and assistance to meet these needs, ensuring we do no harm. Read More...

CARESOM RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS AUGUST 2021

This RGA aimed to gather gender-related information especially gender roles, responsibilities, barriers, misconceptions, social norms, policies, and support systems available for survivors of Gender-Based Violence. The analysis covers five geographical areas within Somalia (Somaliland, Puntland, Galmudug, South West and Banadir) comprising 10 regions and 20 districts. This analysis employed both a qualitative and quantitative assessment using desk reviews, household questionnaires, Focus Group Discussions(FGDs), key informant interviews (KIIs), and individual stories. In total, 2,437 households were interviewed (72.5% female and 27.5% male) while 51 FGDs and 26 KIIs were conducted. The assessment was conducted within CARE Somalia Program areas and households were randomly selected while FGDs and KIIs participants were purposively selected based on gender, age, availability, location and knowledge of topics under investigation. Data was collected by 36 enumerators (16 females and 20 males) using KOBO Collect and analysed using SPSS, PowerBI and Excel. The findings have been presented using graphs, tables, maps, descriptive and inferential statistics. Below are the key findings and recommendations from the assessment. [50 Pages] Read More...

Analyse Rapide Genre : Tremblement de terre du 14 août en Haïti

Haïti est enclin à des catastrophes naturelles de plusieurs sortes : cyclones, tempêtes tropicales, éboulements, inondations et tremblement de terre. En moins de douze ans, deux terribles tremblements de terre ont secoué le pays, entrainant des dommages énormes en vie humaine et en perte de toute sorte. Alors que le pays ne s’était pas encore remis des séquelles du premier séisme de magnitude 7.0 en 2010, un deuxième de magnitude 7.2 vient s’abattre le 14 août 2021 au sud du pays dont la plupart des sections communales affectées sont enclavées et difficiles d’accès. Selon le Gouvernement d’Haiti, on peut à date dénombrer 2 248 morts, 12 763 blessés et 329 personnes portées disparues.
Cette catastrophe vient augmenter le lot des préoccupations auxquelles est confrontée la société haïtienne en pleine crise politique, suite à la mort du président de la République en juillet 2021 et au cœur de toute sorte d’insécurité dont le kidnapping. Le pays continue à faire face à la COVID-19 qui a entrainé 588 morts sur un total de 21 124 cas, craignant jusqu’à présent des conséquences qui seraient dues aux éventuelles variantes. Ce désastre qui frappe sévèrement tous les secteurs d’activités de la vie nationale est également survenu en pleine saison cyclonique et à la veille de la rentrée scolaire. Il vient instaurer une situation humanitaire que les leçons tirées des crises antérieures permettront de mieux gérer.
C’est dans ce contexte particulièrement complexe qu’ONU Femmes et CARE, sous le leadership du Ministère à la Condition féminine et aux Droits des femmes (MCFDF) et en coordination avec la Direction Générale de la Protection Civile (DGPC), ont lancé l’Analyse Rapide Genre qui se veut une évaluation rapide de l’impact du tremblement de terre d’août 2021 sur les femmes, les hommes, les filles et les garçons, incluant les personnes en situation de vulnérabilité, afin d’éclairer la réponse humanitaire en cours en Haïti dans l’immédiat, ainsi que les efforts de redressement à moyen et à long terme. Cette étude est faite en partenariat avec l’Equipe spéciale genre de l’équipe humanitaire en Haiti et a obtenu le soutien financier, technique et logistique des partenaires suivantes : Fondation Toya, IDEJEN, UNFPA, OCHA, OMS/OPS, ONUSIDA, PAM, PNUD, et UNICEF.
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