Impact Report

Women’s involvement in coffee agroforestry value- chains Financial training, village savings and loans associations, and decision power in Northwest Vietnam

Colleagues in Vietnam and at CCAFS and the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) carried out some research on our work in the coffee value chain (TEAL).

This study assessed VSLA impacts and related training on gender equality and women’s access to coffee markets in an ongoing coffee- project in northwest Vietnam.

Applying the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI), women rated perceptions of their decision-making over a range of 18 tasks related to household and agricultural responsibilities and use of income and social activities (over 18 months). There were improvements in decision-making power in categories with previously low participation and increased sharing of domestic responsibilities (biggest gains were decision-making over large purchases and use of income). Also found that husbands to women in the study embraced more equal sharing of responsibility and decision-making with their wives.
This report is 40 pages long. Read More...

A Social Impact Analysis of CARE’s ‘Enhancing Women’s Voice to STOP Sexual Harassment ’ Project

The Enhancing Women’s Voice to Stop Sexual Harassment project (STOP), an initiative of CARE Australia, has been working since 2017 to prevent and address the under-reported problem of sexual harassment in mainland Southeast Asia’s garment sector. At the time of writing, STOP is the only initiative that addresses this issue on a multi-country scale within the sub-region. Operating across a pool of garment factories in four Mekong countries—Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam—STOP aims to enhance women’s voice and economic rights at both the national and factory levels. Based on a socio-ecological model of violence prevention, CARE Country Offices (COs) are working with participating factories to create workplaces where female workers feel safe and experience less SH through the implementation of standardised SH reporting mechanisms and rigorous training programs. Supported by CARE Regional staff, each CARE CO engages with relevant country, regional and international stakeholders to strengthen the national regulatory environment to promote laws, policies and mechanisms to address SH in the workplace.

In 2018, CARE Australia commissioned a consortium of researchers from UNSW Sydney and UNSW Canberra to undertake an independent evaluation the STOP project and provide a separate Social Impact Assessment (SIA) focused on Cambodia STOP as the particular case study. The SIA is intended to complement the findings of the Final Evaluation (FE) of the STOP, as implemented in the other three project sites. The SIA and the Final Evaluation should be read as two parts of a single whole. The UNSW team drew upon a range of evaluative sources including factory surveys, focus group discussions and key informant interviews with factory workers, middle management and government officials. A conceptual framework is also advanced in order to better capture the nuances of social impact and gender transformation, and to provide a rigorous basis on which to evaluate STOP’s development and implementation in Cambodia. [94 pages]. Read More...

Social Outcomes of the CARE-WWF Alliance in Mozambique Results and Recommendations from a Decade of Conservation and Development Programming

In 2008, the CARE-WWF Alliance emerged as a major strategic partnership between two international non- governmental organizations seeking to tackle the linked challenge of poverty and natural resource degradation. From the start, the mission of the Alliance was to test the idea that empowering some of the poorest and most vulnerable women and communities on the planet to engage in sustainable livelihoods and natural resource governance could improve their wellbeing and conserve globally important biodiversity.

This impact report summarises the results from the full project evaluation. Read More...

What Does Gender-Sensitive Cash and Voucher Assistance Look Like?

CARE is committed to being “cash ready” to achieve breakthroughs for women and girls in its cash and voucher assistance (CVA) and to convene other stakeholders on the gendered aspects of CVA. Building that commitment, CARE commissioned a study on gender-sensitive CVA from its own project participants. The study aimed at understanding the:
- Extent to which women, men, boys, and girls have been involved in the design of CVA and the implications of this involvement.
- Potential for CVA to foster positive and sustainable gender roles and relations that contribute to gender equity.
- Gender-related barriers and risks associated with collecting and receiving CVA including social and cultural
attitudes and protection risks. Read More...

Community-Driven Financial Inclusion for the Most Vulnerable Households

The Tat Lan Programme, funded by the Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) in Myanmar was implemented in two phases (2013-15 and 2017-18). The overall goal was to ensure a sustainable increase of food and nutrition security and incomes of participant households in 259 communities in the townships of Myebon, Pauktaw, Kyaukpyu and Minbya in Rakhine State. [24 pages] Read More...

Sociedades Inclusivas e Interculturales Impacto Del Programa

En Ecuador CARE busca combatir la pobreza y la injusticia social que afectan de manera desproporcionada a niñas, adolescentes y mujeres afrodescendientes, indígenas, sobrevivientes de violencia de género, que viven en comunidades afectadas por desastres naturales, el cambio climático y que han sido forzadas a desplazarse de sus comunidades de origen por crisis y conflictos bélicos. Para ello, su enfoque de trabajo consiste en generar alianzas y fortalecer las capacidades de las mujeres, de sus familias, de líderes locales y nacionales y de entidades públicas, con el fin de asegurar una vida libre de violencia y el pleno ejercicio de los derechos humanos al mayor número posible de mujeres y hombres en el país. [46 pages] Read More...

Lend With Care (LWC) Assessment Project Thrive Report

This report is part of LENDWITHCARE (LWC) assessment project and focuses on the evaluation of LWC partner in Zimbabwe, THRIVE Microfinance. The report was prepared by the University of Portsmouth (UoP), partner in the project, after a second wave of a household survey to a sample of THRIVE clients who have been supported by the LWC crowdfunding platform.

The study sample includes 341 new THRIVE clients and 157 non-clients, first interviewed in 2016 (April to June) by a team of interviewers recruited from a local university. The second wave of interviews took place approximately one year later (June to August), when some of the clients were starting to repay their third loan. 245 clients and 110 non-clients were available to be interviewed. [25 pages]
Read More...

SDVC II Social Impact Studies

The study has explored dietary diversity, milk consumption, and perception of nutrition, hand washing and hygiene practices of SDVC project participants of four upazila namely Kaunia, Badargonj, Shajadpur and Gabtoli of three districts of Northern part of Bangladesh. For this topic a total 6 FGDs and 12 key informant interviews have conducted with 84 women group members of SDVC project. The group members and DFT center have selected based on length of membership and duration of installment of DFT. (15 pages) Read More...

Impact Assessment of Savings Groups

Researchers from IPA, along with CARE staff and their implementing partners, conducted a randomized evaluation of Village Savings and Loans Association (VSLA) programs in Ghana, Malawi, and Uganda to examine two questions: Who joins savings groups? And, what is the impact on households from programs that promote savings groups? The evaluation used a randomized control trial (RCT) design, in which eligible communities were randomly divided into two sets: a set of villages with access to a VSLA program (the treatment group) and a set of villages where the program was not implemented during the study (the control group). The study started in Ghana in 2008 and in Malawi and Uganda in 2009, and the final data collection took place in 2011 in the three countries. Each site included a panel survey in which households were surveyed before the start of the program implementation and again two or three years later. Over 15,000 households in almost 950 communities were surveyed. The surveys covered a large variety of topics, including health, education, income-generating activities, asset holdings, food consumption, non-food expenditure, intra-household decision making and community involvement. At the time of the endline survey, after an average of two years of program implementation in the three sites, one third of respondents had joined a VSLA group. On average, members had been part of a group for 15 months and 61% of members had gone through a full savings cycle, normally lasting between 8 and 12 months. The evaluation should thus be thought of as assessing the relatively short-term impacts of the intervention. [62 pages] Read More...

Evaluation d’Impact du Projet D’Etablissement des Cultures Vivrières

La présente évaluation commanditée par CGOZA, se rapporte à l’établissement des cultures vivrières en zone sahélienne et soudano sahélienne au Mali. Dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre des activités de recherche/action de technologies éprouvées relatives à l’établissement des cultures, l’Institut d’Economie Rural et le Groupe de Coordination des Zones Arides, ont mené des actions de Recherche/Développement auprès des producteurs de cultures vivrières des régions de Koulikoro, Ségou et Mopti. Certaines ONG membres de GCOZA Mali ont bénéficié des financements auprès de NORAD pour mener la mise en œuvre d’une phase de diffusion. Read More...

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