Conflict

Addressing GBV & SRHR Challenges in Bama and Dikwa LGAs in Borno State, Northeast Nigeria

Borno state in Northeast Nigeria has been under frequent attacks in the past decade, which has left several million people insecure, homeless, and without any means of livelihood. Hence, the rate of Gender-based Violence (GBV) continues to increase coupled with lack of awareness and basic infrastructure for promoting Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). To alleviate the challenges faced by several inhabitants of these conflict-affected communities, CARE is implementing a SRHR and GBV project to reach 47,000 vulnerable boys, girls, men and women, living in Internally Displaced Person (IDP) camps and host communities in Bama and Dikwa Local Government Areas (LGAs) in Borno State. This report highlights the current gaps in GBV and SRHR in Bama and Dikwa LGAs to serve as benchmark for measuring progress and guide implementation of the right intervention mix.
In October – November 2019, CARE Nigeria conducted a baseline survey for the project. The study involved administration of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) questionnaires as well as Focus Group Discussions (FGD) and Key Informant Interviews (KII) covering SRHR and GBV to randomly selected men, women, boys and girls in the project communities. Among the interviewed were; community members, representatives of security agencies, camp coordinator and health facility staffs respectively, in Dikwa and Bama LGAs in Borno State. A total of 79 FGDs and 46 KIIs were conducted, in addition to the quantitative survey involving 3,112 participants. Read More...

Community Health Needs Assessment – Where Health Services Are Not Accessible in “White Areas” of Ghazni, Paktya and Khost provinces

Between 15-25 December 2019, CARE Afghanistan carried out Rapid Needs Assessments (RNA) in selected communities in Ghazni, Paktya, and Khost provinces, with specific focus on communities in congested areas where conflict-affected populations reside – specifically AOG controlled areas with lack of government or NGOs providing services, including health services.

The aim of the assessment was to assess the condition of needs, vulnerabilities and access issues – both for the population and for CARE - in the selected communities within mentioned provinces to help inform a proposal to ECHO for health and some integrated GBV and nutrition interventions.

Results of the rapid assessment in the confirmed an ongoing lack of access to basic services (with acute gaps in access to trauma care services, SRH and GBV services). Given chronic conflict, lack of humanitarian assistance, poor outlook for the population and lack of available basic services, all those interviewed emphasized a strong need to meet their basic humanitarian needs, more particularly, the existing need for health response. Both respondents and local authorities also identified health and trauma care support as priority assistance, and emphasized its criticality because of remoteness and very long distance from nearest health facilities. Read More...

Integrated Basic Emergency Assistance to Conflict-Affected and Vulnerable Communities in Yemen Project

CARE Yemen has been implementing an OFDA-supported “Integrated Basic Emergency Assistance to Conflict-Affected and Vulnerable Communities” project in four districts (Sudah, As Sawd, Jabal Yazid, and Maswar) of Arman Governorate; two districts (Ash Shagadirah and Ku’aydinah) of Hajjah Governorate; and three districts (Alrujum, Jabal Mahweet, and Hafash) of Al-Mahweet Governorate Yemen. The goal of the project is to improve the basic living conditions, and facilitate early recovery and resilience of internally displaced persons and host communities affected by conflict in Yemen. This project seeks to meet the critical WASH and basic living needs of the most vulnerable households living in the targeted districts so that lives are saved, suffering is alleviated, and human dignity is maintained. The specific objectives of the project are: reduce morbidity from WASH-related diseases of vulnerable IDPs and host communities; enable the most vulnerable IDPs and host communities to meet their basic and immediate needs, and increase their asset base; and improve the food security and nutritional status of the most vulnerable host communities. Read More...

WASH Support to IDPs & host communities in Duhlok and Ninawa, Iraq (2017-2019)

CARE’s GAC funded WASH project started in January 2017 providing critical water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services to improve overall WASH services for women, men, boys and girls and reduce tensions between the host community and IDPs in the areas of 4 IDP camps (Mamrashan, Essyan, Sheikhan, and Chamishko), and host community collectives (Ardawan, Ba’adre, Kalakchi, Mahate and Ayas) of Duhok Governorate. The project also had an emergency response component in November 2017 in three neighbourhoods of West Mosul (Al-Mansour, Al-Jawsaq and Wadi Al-Hajar). The project is implemented through two local partners Harikar and REACH. Working through partners is a key modality of CARE’s country strategy to strengthen the capacity of local NGOs. This approach has had a significant impact in achieving the GAC aim of supporting vulnerable and conflict-affected people living in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The ongoing WASH intervention aims to provide 55,572 (27,318 women & 28,434 men)2 IDPs and members of host communities with access to water supply, safe sanitary facilities and increased awareness on safe hygiene practices in a dignified, gender-sensitive and culturally appropriate manner.
The midterm project evaluation aims to assess the relevance, performance, and progress on targets within the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men, women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations for CARE Iraq and project partners to improve the implementation of the final year of the GAC project as well and strengthen the design of future related projects. Read More...

Addressing Root Causes Project in South Sudan

The Addressing Root Causes (ARC) project that started in September 2016, aims at tackling the root causes of armed conflict, instability and irregular migration in South Sudan by increasing community resilience to conflict-related and economically-induced shocks in 19 payams in Jonglei state in the counties of Pibor, Twic East, Duk and Bor. The project has distinguished three outcomes areas: Economic Resilience, Peaceful Conflict Resolution and Social Cohesion which are expected to be mutually reinforcing and when all are combined and stregthened together, the beneficial effects will contribute to more resilience and a culture of peace.
This mid-term review was conducted to assess the progress of project implementation since September 2016, and document best practices and lessons learned to inform key stakeholders on future activity design, programming, and implementation. Primary data was collected using household survey, key Informant Interviews and Focus Group Discussions with the targeted communities. Combined with the FGD, a Social Norm Analysis Plot (SNAP) framework was applied as it was considered best suited to measure changes in social (gender) norms.
Key findings from review indicate access to loans and training of VSLA groups is empowering women and youth in the targeted communities to engage in IGAs and micro-enterprises, thereby broadening their livelihood and resilience options and creating market linkages with traders across different ethnic communities. Further, more women and youth reported being confident to participate in economic opportunities and possess relevant tools and skills; and the role of women and youth is being appreciated in contributing to meeting household needs, thereby reflecting the conflict and gender transformation in the targeted communities. It should however be noted that more VSLAs have been formed and are engaged in IGAs and micro-enterprises in Duk and Twic East compared to Bor and Pibor.
Also, peace committees are appreciated and recognized by the targeted communities for facilitating and using peaceful mechanisms to mitigate and resolve intra and – inter community conflict and reconcile past grievances. Most project beneficiaries also reported increased collaboration with each other, and feel have more positive relationships and trust within and beyond their community. Read More...

Évaluation Multisectorielle Conjointe Des Besoins Des Populations Hotes, Deplacees Et Retournees Dans La Region Du LAC

La région du Lac, l’une des plus vulnérables du Tchad, fait face depuis le début de l’année 2015 à un déplacement massif des populations réfugiées, retournées et déplacées internes. En fin d’août 2015, les chiffres croisés de OCHA1 et HCR donnent à 84 898 le nombre des hommes et femmes déplacées dans la région. A ce chiffre s’ajoutent quelques 14 000 personnes déplacées internes installées en septembre autour de Ngouboua. Le caractère dynamique des déplacements et le problème d’accès à certaines zones rend difficile la maitrise du nombre des déplacés qui selon la CNARR atteindrait 127 000 personnes.

Les personnes déplacées ont fui les enlèvements, les assassinats odieux, les abus sexuels et autres pratiques esclavagistes perpétrées par les membres de la secte Boko Haram sur les hommes, les femmes, les filles et les garçons dans le Nord Nigeria et les villages tchadiens qui leurs sont frontaliers.

Les réfugiés sont accueillis au niveau du camp de Dar Es Salam alors que les retournés et les déplacés internes sont répartis dans quelques 19 sites d’accueil et communautés hôtes dans les zones de Bol et Bagasola. Cette dernière accueille presque 40% de son effectif sans aucune préparation ni mesures d’accompagnement, ce qui entraine une pression importante sur les ressources et services déjà insuffisants de la zone.

Les acteurs humanitaires dont les agences membres du système des Nations Unies, quelques ONG internationales et des ONG locales apportent l’assistance aux hommes et femmes déplacés mais leur capacité reste limitée en raison de problème d’accessibilité lié à la sécurité et de l’afflux régulier des populations déplacées depuis juillet 2015.
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Final tatweer evaluation report final

This 57 page document highlights the results of the TATWEER project funded by the Australian Governm... Read More...

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