Refugee

KIWI kids – Kids Welcome Initiative: Life skills, education and the promotion of integration of refugees in primary schools in Germany

Seit Anfang 2015 sind mehr als eine Millionen Menschen neu nach Deutschland gekommen. Rund 40 Prozent der Zugewanderten befinden sich im schulpflichtigen Alter. Anders als in höheren Altersgruppen ist in diesem Alterssegment der Anteil von Mädchen gegenüber Jungen gleich hoch. Damit können in diesen Altersklassen insbesondere zugewanderte Mädchen gestärkt und gefördert werden. Studien zufolge sind Schulen mehrheitlich noch nicht ausreichend auf die Herausforderung der Arbeit mit zugewanderten Schüler*innen vorbereitet (z.B. IQB-Bildungstrends 2018). Dafür benötigen Lehrkräfte insbesondere interkulturelle Kompetenzen. Diese neue Situation verlangt von allen in Deutschland lebenden Menschen vermehrte Anstrengungen aufeinander zuzugehen. Ein gutes Zusammenleben macht es erforderlich, die Selbstwirksamkeit von (zugewanderten) Menschen zu stärken und sie zu aktiven Mitgestaltenden der Gesellschaft zu machen. Daraus folgt, dass der Zugang zu Integration und gesellschaftlicher Teilhabe über die Sozialisationsinstanz „Schule“ nicht früh genug erfolgen kann. Das KIWI kids-Projekt setzt dort an.

KIWI steht für die Begriffe „Kultur“, „Interkulturalität“, „Werte“ und „Initiative“. Ziel des KIWI kids- Projektes ist es, durch Soziales und Interkulturelles Lernen die Integrationspotentiale sowie das Engagement von Kindern mit Flucht- oder Migrationsgeschichte und deren Lehr- und Fachkräfte nachhaltig zu stärken. Damit werden Klassen- und Schulgemeinschaften bei einer nachhaltigen, diversitätssensiblen Öffnung und Schulentwicklung unterstützt. Ein besonderer Fokus des KIWI kids- Projektes liegt dabei auf dem Empowerment von Kindern, der Stärkung ihrer Selbstwirksamkeit sowie dem Abbau von Diskriminierung zwischen Kindern diverser kultureller Identitäten. Read More...

Latin America and the Caribbean rapid gender analysis for COVID-19

Women and girls across Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) are facing a terrifying mix of increased domestic violence and care burden, as well as a lower access to income and jobs, and potential social unrest as a result of the coronavirus outbreaks.

The LAC region has the highest levels of inequality in the world, with wide gaps in living standards across countries, regions, sectors, and socioeconomic spheres. When coupled with the pervasive gender inequality that persists, the response to Covid-19 in LAC becomes immeasurably more complicated. CARE International and UN Women joined forces in Latin America, and the Caribbean on this report which presents a series of recommendations aimed at ensuring a more effective gender-inclusive response in the region. The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) for COVID-19 is a tool designed to provide information about the different needs, risks, capacities, and coping strategies of women, men, boys, girls, and gender-diverse people during the COVID-19 crisis. This RGA is part of the iterative RGA process for the LAC region and is intended as a programming tool for humanitarian actors. Read More...

Provision of life-saving WASH services for Rohingya Refugees in Bagghona/Potibonia (Camp 16), Ukhiya Upazila, Cox’s Bazar District: END LINE SURVEY REPORT

Provision of life-saving WASH services to the Rohingya refugee and host population project for Ukhia Upazila, Cox's Bazar district was implemented in Moynarghona (camp 16) by CARE Bangladesh with funding from UNICEF for twelve (12) months (February, 2019 to February, 2020). The goal of the project was to improve the quality of integrated WASH service delivery to support the well-being of children under 5 years, women, girls, men, boys the elderly and persons with disability in emergency situation. The project targeted 21,883 refugees (52% women and 48% men) with water, sanitation and hygiene promotion interventions.

CARE conducted the midterm assessment in February 2020. The survey involved both quantitative and qualitative data collection tools and approaches. The samples were drawn systematically, with the sample size determined following most common statistical formula. A total of 300 respondent/households from camp 16 participated and the data collection. The questionnaires were uploaded in tablets with KoBo data collection application for accuracy and timeliness.

The objectives of the study are as follows:
- To understand water access situation for the beneficiary households in the camp 16.
- To know the sanitation status and use by households in the camp 16.
- To identify current Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) of targeted respondent on water sanitation and hygiene practices.
- To identify water, sanitation and hygiene challenges for the households in camp 16. Read More...

Combining GBV and Reproductive Health Services in Cox’s Bazar

Since 2018, CARE has implemented static health services at four health posts in CxB, GBV case management at 12 women and girls’ safe spaces, household and sub-block level sensitization for awareness on service availability through 14 outreach teams, and provision of basic health services at mobile outreach spots at the sub-block level. These comprehensive service and demand-side components addressing individual, household, and community barriers to accessing services have enabled a gender-responsive, integrated approach to reach women and girls. See the learning brief here: https://www.care.org/sites/default/files/cxb_srh_gbv_integration_learning_brief_final.pdf Read More...

Bangladesh COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis–Cox’s Bazar

As of 4 May 2020, 10,143 cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in Bangladesh. To date, only 21 cases have been identified in Cox’s Bazar district, which is home to over 850,000 Rohingya refugees and extremely vulnerable host communities. Although no positive COVID-19 cases have been reported in the camps, this is likely to change soon. The conditions in the camps, including overcrowding, limited sanitation facilities and overburdened health system, have made the COVID-19 situation uniquely complex.

A COVID-19 outbreak in the refugee camps and neighboring communities will disproportionately affect women and girls and other vulnerable populations. Gender norms in both refugee and host communities limit women’s and girls’ ability to protect themselves from the virus and have a significant impact on prevention and response efforts. Refugees are reporting “rapidly deteriorating security dynamics within the camps between Rohingya and host communities” stemming from fears around COVID-19.

Women are already being blamed for COVID-19, resulting in a rollback of women’s rights, including mobility, access to services and information. Men, women, and community leaders in are blaming women’s “dishonorable” behavior as the cause of COVID, causing a backlash against women’s rights. Women are experiencing more behavior policing, mobility restrictions, and Gender Based Violence. Read More...

Rapid WASH Assessment: Key Findings IDP sites in North West Syria

Between March 17th and 21st, CARE conducted a Rapid WASH assessment across 78 IDP sites in Idlib and Aleppo Governorate, together with partners IYD, Shafak and Syria Relief.
The displacement of close to one million people since December 2019 has resulted in a very high number of IDP-sites being setup by families on the move. These sites are not planned and many of them do not have the most basic services or infrastructure available. Other sites have grown significantly as new arrivals have settled next to existing camp-like facilities. Increasingly, reports from the areas have highlighted massive gaps in WASH services across these sites and particularly the lack of safe WASH facilities has been reported as a protection concern for girls and women. Simultaneously, the global COVID-19 outbreak has increased the urgency for gaps in WASH services to be addressed. The lack of access to clean water, handwashing facilities and soap undermines any initiative to prevent large scale outbreaks in North West Syria.
CARE, with its partners, therefore conducted a Rapid WASH Assessment across IDP-sites focusing mainly on two basic aspects: availability/usage/status of latrines and availability/usage of clean water, handwashing facilities and soap.
The assessment highlights that:
 Adequate access to sanitation facilities is available in only 10% of the assessed locations. 45% of sites do not have any latrines. For the 55% of sites with latrines, average is 240 individuals per latrine.
 The assessed IDP sites are critically lacking access to clean water, handwashing facilities and soap. Only 37% of the sites have sufficient and regular access to water supplies. As many as 83% of the sites have no access to handwashing facilities. A catastrophic 91% does not have access to soap.
 Very limited, if any, WASH support has reached the assessed locations. Only 44% of the sites report having received any WASH NFI’s in the past two months. Read More...

COVID Needs Assessment Urban Areas and Azraq Camp

The overall aim of this rapid needs assessment is to better understand the impact of both COVID-19 and the containment measures and restrictions implemented by the Government of Jordan on CARE Jordan’s beneficiaries, which include the elderly, pregnant and lactating women, people with disabilities (PwDs) and households with serious health risks and needs. Read More...

BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR ACCESS PROTECTION EMPOWERMENT ACCOUNTABILITY AND LEADERSHIP (APEAL) PROJECT

APEAL Project Overview: APEAL project was designed to deliver a comprehensive, evidence-based and people-centred Protection & Gender-Based Violence (GBV) sector response for recent and newly-arrived refugees from DRC settling in Western Uganda. The one year project is implementing a harmonized intervention package of targeted protection and GBV life-saving assistance with a particular focus on extremely vulnerable individuals.

APEAL Project Baseline Survey: The APEAL project baseline survey was commissioned with the overall objective of collecting values against all outcome level indicators as per the approved project Log Frame. This baseline survey report was compiled based on a cross-sectional survey of individual new DRC arriving refugees and host community members in the project area. Read More...

Final Evaluation of Jordanian Community Development Support Program

This evaluation assessed the Jordanian Community Development and Support Program (JCDSP), which aimed to enhance the socio-economic well-being and quality of life for Jordanian host community members, especially for Jordanian women and young women and men (ultimate outcome). The Program was delivered by CARE Canada and CARE International in Jordan in two phases. Phase 1 spanned three years, from 2014 to 2017, and lent assistance to meet the most critical needs of vulnerable populations from communities in Irbid, Mafraq, Zarqa, and East Amman. Its objective was to augment and supplement overwhelmed government services brought on by the large scale migration of Syrian refugees within these four target communities. The Program’s second phase, lasting 18 months (April 2018 to September 2019), responded to the longer term challenges and opportunities as more and more of the Syrian refugees made the decision to permanently settle in these communities. Under this phase, the Program shifted focus from humanitarian assistance to women’s economic empowerment, social cohesion and safety net enhancements. Accordingly, under this second phase, only two out of the three intermediate outcomes were maintained. As part of the shut-down process of the Program, CARE Canada and CARE International commissioned this summative evaluation to look at the success and challenges derived from this process. Through the collection of primarily qualitative data and augmented with data collected by the Program, this evaluation: 1. Assessed the degree to which the program has achieved its outcome results (impact) and the relative relevance, efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability of program activities to generate these outcome results as per the Program’s theory of change; and 2. Provide insight, analysis and recommendations to CARE Jordan, and the CARE federation regarding the strengths and challenges of the programming to inform and improve future programming. Read More...

Endline Assessment for Multi-Sectoral Assistance to South Sudanese Refugees and Ugandan Host Communities in Bidibidi, Palorinya and Rhino Camp

Mercy Corps and its consortium partners Save the Children (SCI), CARE, Oxfam, and DanChurchAid (DCA) implemented the 21-month “Multi Sectoral Assistance to South Sudanese Refugees and Host Communities in West Nile (Bidibidi, Palorinya and Rhino Camp Settlements)” from May 2017 to February 2019, funded by European Union Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid (ECHO). The project delivered life-saving and protection assistance to vulnerable South Sudanese refugees and host communities in Bidibidi (Yumbe), Palorinya (Moyo) and Rhino Camp (Arua) settlements through 1) General and child protection; 2) Water and sanitation infrastructure and hygiene promotion; 3) Livelihoods and cash-based interventions; and 4) Market development, financial services and enhanced coordination. Specifically, the project aimed to increase resilience of South Sudanese refugees and host communities while promoting peaceful coexistence between and among the target groups. Read More...

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