refugees

Improved WASH Services to the Myanmar Refugees Population in camps 15 (Jamtoli) and 16 (Potibonia), Ukhiya Upazila, Cox’s Bazar

Applying both quantitative and qualitative tools and approaches, the end-line assessment was conducted in February 2022. It covers 415 respondents' households from camps 15 and 16—data collection done with tablets in KoBo. The samples were drawn systematically. First, the sample size was determined following the most common statistical formula. The objectives of the study are as follows: 1) To know the present situation context on WASH; 2) To identify the targeted respondent's current Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP).

The study findings reveal the following:
Water
- The most commonly reported primary sources for drinking water were Piped water tap/Tap Stand, reported by 66% of households.
- In terms of water collection, male engagement has been increased. Overall, 86% of households reported women, followed by adult males (55%) and Children (6%). However, the male also helps them when they cook and cloth wash.
- Overall, only 2% of households reported a combined travel and waiting time of more than 30 Water containers.
- Females preferred to get 'Kolsi' (a pitcher) instead of Bucket or Jerrycan for carrying water. On the other hand, male and adolescent children preferred Jerrycan for carrying the water.
- 76% of respondents feel safe collecting enough water to meet their households' needs, such as drinking, cooking, laundry, bathing etc. However, women also reported that they feel unsafe because men go to water points to collect water.
- A significant proportion of households (88%) do not treat drinking water. Because they believe the drinking water source is safe—12% of households use the aqua tab to treat their water.
Sanitation
- The most-reported defecation (sanitation options) for household members five and above was communal latrines 86%, followed by shared latrines 14%, and single-household latrines 7%. Others places (2 %), bucket and open defecation was seldom reported 1%.
- The accessible latrine is one of the beauties of this project. This latrine is included: The railing on the way, The handle inside, The tap, The commode, The single-use.
- The community also thinks that these latrines will be equally helpful for elderlies.
- A significant 79% responded to the affirmative of privacy of latrine use. A significant number of
- 18% of the households' female members use the designated bathing facilities. However, this figure is low because of privacy concerns.
Hygiene
- All (100%) respondents mentioned that they cleaned every time they filled with fresh/clean water. While at the time of hurriedness, that type of cleaning activity has disrupted.
- 100% of households owned soap at the time of the interview. The study further explored other hand washing options/solutions households use when they do not have soap; because of CoVID-19, all respondents, even children, are aware of handwashing. They can recall the critical time of handwashing.
- Regarding the best way to receive health and hygiene messages, 45% stated Home visits by volunteers, and 2nd choice is by the local leaders. However, the study findings also revealed that only 7% of households said they do not know how to prevent diarrhea.
- 69% of females used reusable clothes, 16% used disposable pads. The reusable cloth is the most preferred for use during the menses.
- Most female respondents said they wash and reuse the MHM materials and dispose of way is Household/Trash bin, Throw in the open waste area/communal bins, In the latrine, Bury in the soil, and, Burn them
RECOMMENDATION
- Consideration of men, women and girls carrying water and provide water container that these particular groups prefer;
- The child-to-chid session needs to discuss the importance of Gender Marker because children remove the gender markers frequently, which causes a problem for the women;
- Need to keep attention to the elderly person in terms of WASH facilities along with Persons with Disabilities;
- Video documentaries for hygiene promotion may be more effective together; in this connection, CARE can collaborate with "shongjog" which is the open platform of CwC in Rohingya Camp. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Ukraine

Like all military operations, this one will take its toll on many communities within Ukraine, with distinct effects on women, men, children and marginalised groups. The starkest example is the current contrast between the requirement that Ukrainian men aged 18 to 60 years stay and join the fighting, and media images of mostly women, children and the elderly fleeing the country.
Ukraine has made modest gains on women’s rights in recent years and has a developing state-level ‘gender machinery’. These gains were already under threat from deeply entrenched and persistent gender and discrimination-based inequalities, eight years of conflict in the east of the country, and the gendered social and economic stress wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic. This current crisis, with mass displacement inside and outside Ukraine, will add to that complex situation and put pressure on any gains that have been made.
Humanitarian actors need to build on the advances in gender equality and women’s empowerment by Ukrainian women’s rights, women-led and civil society organisations, and work with them to identify and respond to the different humanitarian needs of women, men, boys, girls and people of all genders. This Rapid Gender Analysis Brief for Ukraine and the Gender in Crisis Ukraine infographic are a first attempt to identify the gender, age, and diversity issues so that humanitarian responses can better meet people’s different needs as the crisis evolves. Read More...

IMPACT OF COV1D-19 ON WOMEN AND GIRLS IN ETHIOPIA

By August 9, 2021, Ethiopia had reported more than 284,000 COVID-19 cases and 4,426 deaths. Since COVID-19 was first reported in Ethiopia in March of 2021, the impacts of the pandemic, the measures taken to curb COVID-19, and additional political, economic, and environmental crises have severely impacted the population.

Women and girls bear different burdens in this crisis, and emergency responses often overlook the differences in impacts and needs for women, girls, men, and boys in humanitarian responses. To that end, this research— with funding from the EUTF (European Union Emergency Trust Fund) provides insight into the impact of COV1D-19 on women and girls in Ethiopia. This insight informs recommendations and guide EUTF partners and other relevant stakeholders in the areas of EUTF interventions. With this objective in mind, four woredas (administrative districts), one refugee camp, and one Industrial Park (IP) were considered as sample areas. These are Sekota Zuria and Gazgibla woredas in Wag Hemra zone of Amhara region; Moyale and Miyo woredas in Borena Zone of Oromia region, Asayita Refugee Camp in Afar region, and Bole-Lemi Industrial Park in Addis Ababa.

This research surveyed 372 women and girls in April 2021. The quantitative surveys covered adult women and girls over the age of 15. It also provides insights into the differences between refugees, Internally Displaced People (IDPs), refugees, and migrants. Qualitative from focus group discussions and key informant interviews also reflects opinions from men and boys. [75 pages] Read More...

Host Community Situation Analysis Impact of Rohingya Influx on Host Communities in Ukhia and Teknaf

Bangladesh became host to what is now the biggest refugee camp in the whole world. By November 2017 836,487 FDMN (Forcefully Displaced Myanmar Nationals) fled across the Myanmar-Bangladesh border to settle here mostly in two Upazilas:Ukhia and Teknaf of Cox's Bazar district. By January 2018, it became clear that this would be a prolonged crisis lasting years as the Myanmar government continued dithering about taking them back, and as also the FDMN expressed their unwillingness to go back fearing persecution. As a result of this huge and sudden influx, lives and livelihoods of the host communities have been affected in many ways. Therefore, this Situational Assessment aims to assess both the visible economic and the subtle social impacts of the recent influx on the host communities. Using Oxford’s integration conceptual framework, this assessment has been conducted to chalk out CARE Bangladesh’s future response to the refugee crisis by involving the host communities in the process and addressing their concerns so that the tension between the two communities is defused rather than intensified.
Presence of the refugees has brought about many social and economic changes creating massive pressure on the host communities. Economic activities in the two upazilas have gone through transitions, leading to the emergence of a new market system and reducing employment opportunities for the host communities.
On one hand prices of essentials have shot up almost twice as much, and on the other, due to an unpredictably large number of refugees entering the local labor market wages for day laborers have gone down. Though refugees are living in highly congested camps, they are getting aid materials as well as economic opportunity in the local market. On the contrary, the host communities are finding themselves pitted against the refugees as either their work have been taken away or their earnings significantly reduced. It is true that a few locally influential people owning large tracts of land and businesses are benefitting from the availability of cheap labor, but the poor and the ultra-poor from the host communities are bearing the brunt of these changes. Access to administrative, educational and healthcare needs has diminished. Reduced access and availability of CPR-resultant scarcity of timber, bamboo for shelter, food & cooking fuel created insecurity of accessing resources. Due to security risk of woman and girls mobility has goes down, women income earning opportunity getting reduced; all of this has evidently created tension between the host and the refugee communities and within host community households. If left unaddressed, this tension is likely to rise to the extent of creating potential threats of ethnic conflicts.
In response to these findings of the situational analysis possible types of interventions could be Gender specific livelihoods strengthening initiatives based on diversification of off/on farm activities, Transformative approach to build life free from GBV, Promoting youth leadership and Strengthening service delivery and demand side functions through Inclusive governance.
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Beyond four walls and a roof Reflections on the multi-sectoral One Neighbourhood Approach for Syrian Refugees and Host Communities, Tripoli, Lebanon.

The Syrian Civil War, now in its tenth year, has displaced millions of Syrians, both within Syria and into neighbouring countries. Over one million Syrian refugees reside in northern Lebanon, including in the city of Tripoli. This large scale displacement has placed additional strain on housing and services; refugees and vulnerable host communities frequently reside in informal, poor-quality homes in various states of disrepair that are poorly serviced and often damp and damaged. With displacement ongoing, many humanitarian programmes seek to meet the needs of both refugees and address underlying causes of poverty in host communities. These programmes are often multi-sectoral and have social cohesion as an intended outcome and deliver community-wide protection activities alongside housing and WASH support.
With four phases over four years funded by the US Government’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM), the ONA programme has worked to improve housing conditions for the most vulnerable whilst enhancing individual and community resilience and social cohesion through protection programming and participatory approaches. In Phase IV (2018-19), CARE International in Lebanon (CIL) aimed to build on Phases I to III. In common with previous phases, for Phase IV, CIL worked in partnership with local partner Akkarouna to provide multi-sectoral shelter, WASH and Protection assistance to vulnerable Syrian refugees and the Lebanese host community, including Palestinians returning from Syria (PRS) in five neighbourhoods in Tripoli Read More...

WASH, PROTECTION AND SRHR SUPPORT TO IDPS AND RETURNEES IN IRAQ 2020-2021 Baseline

With funding support from the Global Affairs Canada (GAC), CARE implements a 24 months multi-sectoral livesaving project: WASH, Protection and SRMH support to IDPs and Returnees in Iraq 2020-2021 in Duhok governorate (Chamishko and Essyan IDP camps) and Ninewa governorate (Sinjar district) with 64,434 individuals (18,169 women, 14,701 girls, 16,924 men, 14,640 boys) direct beneficiaries aiming at WASH, Protection Intervention, and SMRH. The methodology for baseline survey is based on using mixed-method participatory approach as baseline team believes that participation improves quality and enhances ownership.
The CARE baseline survey data collection for the camps took place from May 21, 2020 to May 31, 2020, and in Sinjar district from September 1, 2020 to September 10, 2020. The purpose of the baseline study is to better understand the situation and current needs of the population in order to ensure more effective and responsive project implementation as well as improved living conditions for IDPs, returnees and host communities in the project areas [45 pages]. Read More...

EDUCATION AND PROTECTION FOR SYRIANS IN JORDAN PROJECT ADA Final Evaluation

The “Education and Protection for Syrians in Jordan'' project has been implemented through CARE International in Jordan and funded by ADA. This project is designed to address the needs of vulnerable Syrians and Jordanian citizens, and targeted four urban areas of Jordan, including Amman, Irbid, Mafraq, and Zarqa. The first objective provided conditional cash for the protection and education of vulnerable youth who are at risk of dropping out or have already dropped out of school due to either working or due to the risk of early/child marriage and, therefore, not attending school. The second objective focused on providing vulnerable families with case-management support, following which referrals were made in order to connect these beneficiaries with both internal and/or external services. In addition, interventions included peer-to-peer support group activities, as well as one-day Psychosocial sessions (PS) implemented at CARE community centers that were focused on recreational, educational, and empowerment activities. The third objective provided small business development training and grants to entrepreneurs hoping to establish or expand their businesses. [19 pages]. Read More...

Kinder und Jugendliche Willkommen KIWI Project III Wirkungsbericht 2020

The KIWI project has been in existence since the beginning of 2016. The pilot phase in North Rhine-Westphalia (January to September 2016) was financed entirely by donations from the alliance Aktion Deutschland Hilft. Funding from the Deutsche Bank Foundation, the RTL Foundation "We Help Children" and the UN Refugee Aid enabled us to expand the program nationwide. Subsequently, we were able to consolidate and further expand KIWI nationwide through funding from the EU's AMIF programme and again from the Deutsche Bank Foundation. The promotion of school projects for the design of diversity and encounters and the awarding of the KIWI prize are part of an accompanying project financed by the Deutsche Bank Foundation. This first impact report according to the Social Reporting Standard includes the results of the third project phase as well as the accompanying project. We also report on the development process of KIWI as a "learning" project. Further funding from the RTL foundation "We help children" gave us the opportunity to transfer the KIWI approach to primary education as part of the KIWI kids pilot project (September 2018 – February 2020). This publication also provides a brief overview of the main results of this pilot phase.

Das KIWI-Projekt existiert seit Anfang 2016. Die Pilotphase in Nordrhein-Westfalen (Januar bis September 2016) wurde vollständig aus Spenden des Bündnisses Aktion Deutschland Hilft finanziert. Eine Förderung durch die Deutsche Bank Stiftung, der Stiftung RTL „Wir helfen Kindern“ sowie der UNO-Flüchtlingshilfe ermöglichte uns die bundesweite Ausdehnung des Programms. Im Anschluss konnten wir durch eine Förderung aus dem AMIF-Programm der EU und wiederum der Deutsche Bank Stiftung KIWI bundesweit konsolidieren und weiter ausbauen. Die Förderung von Schulprojekten zur Gestaltung von Vielfalt und Begegnung und die Verleihung des KIWI-Preises sind Bestandteil eines durch die Deutsche Bank Stiftung finanzierten Begleitprojektes. Dieser erste Wirkungsbericht nach Social Reporting Standard umfasst Ergebnisse der dritten Projektphase sowie des Begleitprojektes. Außerdem berichten wir über den Entstehungs- und Entwicklungsprozess von KIWI als „lernendes“ Projekt. Eine weitere Förderung durch die Stiftung RTL „Wir helfen Kindern“ gab uns die Chance, den KIWI-Ansatz im Rahmen des Pilotprojekts KIWI kids (September 2018 – Februar 2020) auf den Primarschulbereich zu übertragen. Diese Publikation enthält auch einen Kurzüberblick über die wesentlichen Ergebnisse dieser Pilotphase. [64 pages]

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Turkey Case Studies On Syrian Refugees

A collection of case studies about shelter, livelihoods, and protection with Syrian refugees as they tell their stories of getting through their crisis. Read More...

Final Evaluation Food for Peace II program in Syria

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the project “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” in Aleppo and Idleb, funded by USAID Food for Peace and implemented by four partner organizations over a period of 15 months. Project activities included multi-round and emergency cash assistance, in-kind assistance (RTE rations and ready to-eat rations) and wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers participating in another of CARE’s livelihood project, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread production, and infrastructure improvements). The evaluation was conducted in the period between August to mid-September 2020 to address the key evaluation questions posed by CARE, organized under the OECD DAC evaluation criteria: 1) Relevance, 2) Efficiency, 3) Effectiveness, 4) Impact, 5) Sustainability.
The purpose of the evaluation was to document evidence of change at outcome and impact levels to be used for organizational learning and improvements of future programming, and accountability towards donor, partners and ultimately beneficiaries. Read More...

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