Shelter

DEC Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I & Phase II Final Evaluation Report

Yayasan CARE Peduli (YCP) has been implementing a 25-month program of DEC-funded Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I and Phase II, running from 1 October 2018 through 31 October 2020. The project aims to help secure livelihoods recovery for the most vulnerable households in Central Sulawesi who were affected by the major earthquake and tsunami in 2018.
In DEC Phase 1, the emergency response was delivered in the sector of WASH and Shelter to support the disaster-affected people. In DEC Phase 2, the recovery period focused in WASH and livelihood programs, particularly for female-headed households. In both phases, YCP was working in collaboration with PKPU/ HI, as local implementing partner. Overall, the DEC provided supports with the amount of about USD 1 million for 25-months project period and reached to more than 28,000 people.
This evaluation is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the project’s achievements, lessons learned, and recommendations for future actions for similar project within YCP. The evaluation focused on research questions that assess criteria in Core Humanitarian Standards: Appropriateness & relevance; Effectiveness; Timeliness; Strengthening of local actors; Communication, participation and feedback; Coordination with and complementarity to other actors; Continuous learning and improvements; Support for staff; and Management of resources, as well as assessing cross cutting Issues, consists of: Gender sensitivity; Social inclusion and; Accountability.
This report is 54 pages long. Read More...

Strengthening Access to Emergency Primary Health and Protection Services for Most- affected Vulnerable Returnees and Host Families in Ninewa Governorate, Zummar sub-district

With the objective of Increasing access to quality and equitable health care and protection services for vulnerable women, men, boys and girls conflict-affected populations in Zummar primary health care centre (PHCC), underserved and epidemic-prone communities and improving civic participation of local residents, CARE’s interventions targeted highly prioritized areas of Zummar surrounded villages and Zummar PHCC in need of rehabilitation as well as continuing to provide a variety of essential medicine and laboratory supplies for NCD treatment. The SRMH service package included medication (such as oxytocin ampoule, methergine vaginal tablet and suppositories) and medical consumables including suture materials, sterile and non-sterile gauze, gloves to meet needs of patients visiting Zummar PHCC through close collaboration with the Ninawa Directorate of Health (DoH) as the local authorities are currently overwhelmed by the scale of needs to enable affected populations to return home. The project also distributed dignity kits packages to GBV survivors, mainly, vulnerable women and adolescent girls based on pre identified criteria and continued to avail safe space for women and children. The provision of safe space allowed the female patients to concentrate on their medical consultations with the doctors at the PHCC and meaningfully participate in awareness sessions delivered by CARE at the free space within the PHCC without worrying about the safety of their children.
The endline evaluation seeks to analyze the endline values for key SRMH and protection indicators as stated in the project documents in the targeted areas and to assess, impact and effectiveness of programming to successfully track accomplishments of the project, relevance and sustainability of the project after the implementation through the usage of quantitative and qualitative data. The evaluation also looked into areas of success as well as challenges faced implementing activities in Zummar sub-district. [28 pages]. Read More...

SEMI-DURABLE SHELTER CONSTRUCTION AND THE TRIPLE NEXUS A study of the multisector ECHO-funded PAMUNOR project in southern Chad

LA CONSTRUCTION D’ABRIS SEMI-DURABLES ET LE TRIPLE NEXUS Une étude portant sur le projet d’assistance multi-sectorielle d’urgence financé par ECHO pour les réfugiés centrafricains et les communautés hôtes (PAMUNOR) au sud du Tchad

En novembre 2019, deux membres de l’équipe mondiale chargée des abris d’urgence de CARE International Royaume Uni a effectué une visite de deux semaines dans le sud du Tchad afin d’évaluer la composante Abris dans le cadre du projet PAMUNOR (Projet d’Assistance Multisectorielle d’Urgence pour les Nouveaux Réfugiés Centrafricains et des Communautés Hôtes) qui est financé par ECHO et géré par CARE Tchad. Ce projet cherche à promouvoir un environnement sûr et sécurisé, notamment en fournissant des abris semi-durables, et à favoriser les moyens de subsistance pour améliorer la sécurité alimentaire et atténuer les stratégies d’adaptation négatives adoptées par les réfugiés centrafricains (RCA) nouvellement arrivés, ainsi que par les membres vulnérables au sein de la communauté hôte. L’un des objectifs spécifiques visant à promouvoir un « environnement sécurisé » consistait à réduire les risques de violence basée sur le genre (VBG) et à assurer une médiation intra et intercommunautaire afin de garantir la coexistence pacifique – condition préalable indispensable à la protection et à la mise en œuvre de l’autosuffisance. L’évaluation s’est intéressée aux détails techniques et opérationnels de la composante Abris et a cherché à comprendre comment cette dernière s’intégrait à une approche programmatique plus large dans le contexte local. Elle a également examiné ses liens avec les différents mécanismes communautaires bénéficiant du soutien du projet. Le succès de la mise en œuvre s’explique par cette approche intégrée qui répond à la fois aux besoins urgents et fondamentaux en termes d’abris et de réduction des risques liés à la VBG, jette les bases pour la sûreté et la sécurité, et génère un environnement propice au développement des moyens de subsistance et favorable à la naissance d’aspirations et d’ambitions en termes d’éducation, de formation et d’apprentissage. Il est important de mentionner l’éventail de mécanismes qui a été mis en place par la communauté pour atténuer les conflits communautaires et la violence basée sur le genre, fruit d’un processus inclusif qui favorise la viabilité et l’appropriation. Les processus de renforcement de la coexistence pacifique, de la cohésion sociale et visant à favoriser l’intégration locale font partie intégrante de l’approche suivie par le projet, l’objectif recherché étant l’autosuffisance, et ils incarnent incontestablement le « troisième côté du triangle » au cœur du nexus Humanitaire-Développement-Paix. De ce point de vue, le projet permettrait de tirer de précieux enseignements programmatiques qui pourraient s’avérer pertinents dans d’autres contextes, au Tchad ou dans d’autres pays, connaissant des déplacements prolongés, un conflit communautaire de faible intensité, des besoins humanitaires et des opportunités de renforcement de la résilience, de l’autosuffisance et de la viabilité.

Two members of CARE International UK’s global Emergency Shelter Team conducted a two-week visit to southern Chad in November 2019 to evaluate the shelter component of CARE Chad’s ECHO-funded PAMUNOR project (Projet d’Assistance Multisectorielle d’Urgence pour les Nouveaux Réfugiés Centrafricains et des Communautés Hôtes / Project to provide multisectoral emergency assistance to newly displaced Central African Republic refugees and host communities). This project seeks to support safe and secure living environments, including through the provision of semi-durable shelters, and to stimulate livelihoods, improving food security and reducing negative coping mechanisms amongst newly arrived refugees from Central African Republic (CAR) as well as vulnerable members of the host community. A specific focus on supporting a “secure environment” was through reducing the risks of genderbased violence (GBV) and mediating within and between communities to ensure peaceful coexistence as a necessary pre-requisite for protection and the establishment of self-sufficiency. The evaluation was achieved by looking closely at the shelter component in technical and operational detail as well as by probing its connection to a broader programmatic approach within the local context and its links to various community mechanisms supported through the project. Effective implementation has been achieved through this integrated approach that simultaneously addresses urgent and fundamental needs for shelter and GBV-risk reduction while laying the foundations for safety and security and creating an enabling environment for the development of livelihoods and the growth of aspirations and ambitions for education, training and learning. Of particular note is the range of mechanisms to reduce community conflict and gender-based violence established through a highly effective community-led and inclusive process that brings sustainability and ownership. Processes of strengthening peaceful co-existence, social cohesion and stimulating local integration run through the project’s approach, seeking to catalyse self-sufficiency, and arguably represents the “third side of the triangle” within the humanitarian-development-peace nexus. In this regard, the project could provide valuable programmatic lessons to other contexts in Chad or elsewhere where protracted displacement, low-level community conflict, humanitarian needs and some opportunities for strengthening resilience, self-sufficiency and sustainability are present. [94 pages] Read More...

Lessons Learnt from CARE’s Shelter Responses to Cyclone Idai in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe

Read More...

Turkey Case Studies On Syrian Refugees

A collection of case studies about shelter, livelihoods, and protection with Syrian refugees as they tell their stories of getting through their crisis. Read More...

Final Project End-line assessment of Shelter, NFI, Hygiene, SRHR and Livelihood Support for Disaster-Affected Populations in Afghanistan 2018-2020

The Emergency Shelter, NFI, Hygiene, SRHR and Livelihood Support for Disaster-Affected Populations in Afghanistan 2018-2020 Project aims to provide emergency assistance to the identified beneficiaries settled in Kabul, Parwan, Kapisa, Balkh, Ghazni, Khost and Paktya provinces of Afghanistan. The interventions covered under this project included Shelter, NFI, WASH, Livelihoods and SRHR needs of the women, men, boys and girls affected by disasters. The sample of 352 households for this end line evaluation was structured as according to the proportion beneficiaries per the different project outputs The two main output blocks of hygiene/SRHR on the one hand and different forms of cash and NFI support on the other are well captured in the end line survey. In addition to the quantitative approach, 8 FGDs, 7 KIIs and 3 IDIs conducted were conducted with the project beneficiaries, stakeholders and the GAC project team.
Read More...

SHELTER ASSESSMENT – GAZİANTEP AND ŞANLIURFA

Summary of findings from a survey of needs among people in South West Turkey in need of shelter support. Read More...

Humanitarian Project in South Waziristan Tribal District (SWTD): End of Project Evaluation Report

Over five million persons were displaced from the tribal districts of ex-FATA region over the last decade. Over 90% of these persons have now returned and face massive humanitarian needs. CARE International in Pakistan (CIP) is implementing a humanitarian project in SWTD focused on WASH activities. In October 2019, CIP commissioned a joint independent evaluation to assess its relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability. The evaluation collected information through a desk review of key documents, 9 FGDs and 200 household interviews with men and women in the project locations, 6 key informant interviews and physical observations. Overall, the quality and impact of the project is high, which is especially commendable given the extremely challenging work environment and external constraints. Read More...

CARE International in Pakistan (CIP) Humanitarian Project in North Waziristan Tribal District (NWTD): End of Project Evaluation Final Report

Over five million persons from the tribal districts of ex-FATA region were displaced over the last decade. Over 90% of these persons have now returned and face massive humanitarian needs. CARE International in Pakistan (CIP) implemented a humanitarian project in NWTD through a local partner (PRDS) focused on WASH and shelter. In October 2019, CIP commissioned an independent evaluation of the project to assess its relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability. The evaluation collected information through a desk review of key documents, 8 FGDs and 200 household interviews with men and women in the project locations, 8 key informant interviews and physical observations. Overall, the quality and impact of the project is high, which is especially commendable given the extremely challenging work environment and external constraints. Read More...

Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) phase III & Improving Living Condition and Mitigating Monsoon Risk for the Refugees: Endline Study Report

CARE Bangladesh has partnered with IOM since November 2017 as Site Management Support Agency in Camp 16 (Potibunia) and since 01 January 2019 in Camp 13 of Ukhia upazila of Cox’s Bazar District.

A joint End-line assessment was conducted in both camps being site managed and coordinated by CARE Bangladesh (Camps 13 and 16) with the support from IOM and IRW. In addition, Shelter and WASH component were also supported by these two donors for selected HH. The purpose of this end-line study was to provide measurable data against project targets, indicators, outcomes and objectives, as well as to help prioritize activities and focus of work across the two locations.

Overall, the situation seemed improved more in camp 16 than in camp 13 followed by CARE intervention which was at the same level in the baseline. . Participation in decision making process block wise in both camps increased almost by 39%. 95% of respondents said that site development activity was done in last month that indicates the value of work actually ongoing. On the shelter response almost 66% responded they are having good quality shelter. Access to enough water for household need and water treatment stratus before drinking increased simultaneously in a good way. Open defecation is still having a concerning issues in both camp. A variety of factors might explain these differences that explained with deeper analysis in this report. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all