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USAID HAMZARI PROJECT Review of Youth Needs and Labor Market Assessment

This paper is a homebased, desktop review completed in the U.S. over 20 workdays of the Niger – Youth Needs and Labor Market Assessment draft report dated October 2019. This assessment was mainly based on the analysis of data collected in the field in the August 2019 period within three rural communes (Chadakori, Guidan Roumdji and Guidan Sori) targeted by the Hamzari Project in Niger’s Maradi Region.1 As it is possible that all the data collected is not reflected in this draft report, the author of this review attempts to complement this prior initial draft report with his own in-depth knowledge of Niger. Read More...

Labor Market Assessment of the USAID Development Food Security Activity (DFSA): “Strengthen PSNP4 Institutions and Resilience (SPIR)”

Ethiopia is among the fastest growing non-oil economies in the world. Although Ethiopia has been advancing at an impressive rate, the gains are not being equally seen across the country. The rural populations continue to rely on traditional livelihood means and have not equally benefited from the industrialization taking place primarily in and around the capital and other large cities of the country.

For the purposes of this LMA, a comprehensive desk review, together with primary surveys in six woredas across Amhara and Oromia were conducted. Read More...

Barriers and supports to reducing early child bearing among newly married adolescent girls in Zinder region: A qualitative study

CARE carried out formative research to understand the underlying gender and social norms, barriers to and facilitators for delaying early child birth among married/soon-to-be-married adolescent girls in Zinder region, from the perspective of multiple gatekeepers in the lives of married/soon-to-be-married adolescent girls. Read More...

Adolescent Motherhood: Understanding Individual and Community Perspectives to Delay First Birth in Rural Bangladesh

Globally, more than one third of girls marry before the age of 15. In Bangladesh, like in other developing countries, adolescent marriage is still very common. Early marriage leads to early pregnancy, as young wives are not allowed to make their own decisions about contraceptive use and timing of childbirth, deferring instead to their husbands and extended family. The major objectives of this formative research were to explore the intentions, desires, perspectives, motivators, and de‐motivators around the first pregnancy among married adolescent girls (MAGs). The study also explored ways to delay first pregnancies among MAGs, focusing on influential people in their lives, health providers, and positive deviants. Additionally, we examined alternative opportunities and barriers to delay first pregnancy through pursuit of an alternative life course and the use of modern contraceptives. The findings will be used to design an appropriate intervention for rural Bangladesh. Read More...

Market Systems Analysis: Alternative Economic Pathways for Adolescent Girls in Kurigram district, Bangladesh

This market analysis aims to provide an overview of the sub-sectors within the Kurigram district of Bangladesh that offer viable and attractive economic alternatives to immediate childbearing for adolescent girls. Using a market systems development lens from the outset, the analysis consisted of a literature review, participatory sub-sector prioritization, and qualitative primary research in Kurigram that mapped the prioritized sub-sectors, focused on identifying opportunities and constraints for the participation of girls. Read More...

IMAGINE Baseline Analysis Report

CARE has partnered with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to implement IMAGINE, a project that examines how to support married adolescent girls and their families. The project aims at helping young women in Niger and Bangladesh to delay their first birth and to envision, value, and pursue alternative life trajectories. IMAGINE’s goal is two-fold: to identify, design, and test interventions that hold promise for delaying the timing of first birth among married adolescents and to document and share learning from this initiative with the wider development community to inform others working to address the issue of adolescent childbearing. IMAGINE is multifaceted, with components that enable married adolescent girls to delay first birth and to afford greater choice in pursuing an alternative life course. Read More...

COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis Global Trends June 2020

In the three months since CARE released its first Rapid Gender Analysis of COVID-19, the situation has evolved quickly and spread globally. CARE has continued to closely monitor this situation, by conducting context-specific analyses in 5 regions covering 64 countries. This has included conversations and data collection with more than 4,500 women.
This new analysis confirms the initial findings and predictions of the first analysis. It also reveals new areas of high priority for women and girls—and for men and boys—as the crisis deepens. Our recent research reveals:
• The highest immediate priorities 3 months into the crisis are food, income, and rights—including concerns around Gender Based Violence, caregiving burdens, and mobility. Women and girls show these needs most acutely, but they also rise to the top of men and boys’ priorities in COVID-19.
• Women’s burdens are increasing. As frontline workers in the health system, as survivors of Gender Based Violence, as the people primarily responsible for food, cleaning, and childcare—especially with schools closed, women confirm that their burdens are rising, and so is the stress around them.
• Women are displaying remarkable leadership, but are still unable to access most decision-making, around COVID-19 and around daily life. They are also quickly approaching the end of their safety nets.
In this context, this document provides updated recommendations to focus on lessening the immediate impact on women and providing the chance to build back equal. These recommendations cluster around:
• Urgently addressing top priorities of food, income, and rights by expanding safety nets—both in the immediate response and in long-term ways for all people to provide their own food and livelihoods.
• Reducing women’s burdens by providing extra support for caregiving, services for GBV prevention and response, and investing in women healthcare workers.
• Prioritizing women’s leadership by creating space for women leaders at all levels of the response, and consistently listening to women’s perspectives and data as the crisis evolves.
Read More...

Iraq COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis

As of June 2020, Iraq is experiencing drastic increase in the number of people who contracted COVID-19 compared to the preceding months. With the everchanging context of COVID-19, women, girls, men and boys in Iraq have been affected differently; and they developed different coping mechanisms. Furthermore, their roles within households have been directly impacted by the crisis, and their participation and access to services also have reflected the gendered dynamics of the COVID-19. There has been an increase in the protection and gender-based violence risks identified and reported, and women and girls are disproportionately affected by these risks. Read More...

Vietnam Rapid Gender Analysis May 2020

Vietnam reported its first known case of COVID-19 on 23 January 2020. As of 19 May, the country had 324 confirmed cases, with 263 recoveries and no deaths.
In Vietnam, COVID-19 presents a range of contextual challenges including high numbers of migrant workers, high numbers of employees in the garment industry, many people working in the informal sector, and linguistically and culturally diverse ethnic minorities. The impacts of COVID-19 on vulnerable groups, such as migrant workers, informal workers, garment factory workers, and ethnic minorities are further marginalising these groups, exacerbating poverty and inequality and increasing their exposure to other social, economic and protection risks.
Women in Vietnam have historically been underrepresented in public decision-making processes, a trend that is reflected in high-level decision-making structures on COVID-19. This means that even as women are disproportionately affected by the crisis, they have less say in how their country should respond to it. Read More...

Myanmar COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis version 1

As of 7 June 2020, there have been 228 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Myanmar,1 and new cases continue to be confirmed.2 Myanmar’s humanitarian and conflict dynamics, high poverty rate, flow of returning migrants, high numbers of internally displaced people and urban slum-dwellers, and high proportion of workers in the informal sector present a range of challenges in the context of COVID-19. These factors tend to make prevention and control measures more difficult, while also intensifying the potential impacts of a larger outbreak, if it were to occur.
Despite the relatively low number of verified cases within its borders to date, the pandemic has already had an outsized economic impact in Myanmar. Migrant workers, informal sector workers including sex workers, and garment sector workers have all been disproportionately affected. Women in Myanmar have traditionally been under-represented in public decision-making processes, a trend which is continuing in structures established to respond to COVID-19. This means that even as women are disproportionately affected by the crisis, they have less say in how their communities and country respond to it, increasing the risk of a COVID-19 response that does not adequately address the needs and priorities of the most vulnerable women and girls. Read More...

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