Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

Looking for something specific? You can filter the evaluations using the dropdown menus on the right side of the screen.

If you have an evaluation or study to share, please e-mail the document to ejanoch@care.org for posting.

Myanmar COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis

As of 7 June 2020, there have been 228 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Myanmar,1 and new cases continue to be confirmed.2 Myanmar’s humanitarian and conflict dynamics, high poverty rate, flow of returning migrants, high numbers of internally displaced people and urban slum-dwellers, and high proportion of workers in the informal sector present a range of challenges in the context of COVID-19. These factors tend to make prevention and control measures more difficult, while also intensifying the potential impacts of a larger outbreak, if it were to occur.
Despite the relatively low number of verified cases within its borders to date, the pandemic has already had an outsized economic impact in Myanmar. Migrant workers, informal sector workers including sex workers, and garment sector workers have all been disproportionately affected. Women in Myanmar have traditionally been under-represented in public decision-making processes, a trend which is continuing in structures established to respond to COVID-19. This means that even as women are disproportionately affected by the crisis, they have less say in how their communities and country respond to it, increasing the risk of a COVID-19 response that does not adequately address the needs and priorities of the most vulnerable women and girls. Read More...

End of Project Evaluation: Support for conflict affected people through strengthening of essential primary health care and protection from gender-based violence

Since 2014, when Iraq experienced a sudden escalation in hostilities, the primary health care sector has sustained widespread destruction, looting of health facilities, reduced or inadequate health staff, and lack of supplies, especially in areas that had been severely impacted by the conflict, such as Anbar & Mosul. Sexual, reproductive and maternal health (SRMH), was severely affected, amongst other things, by poor delivery methods, lack of maternity wards, inadequate pre- and postnatal care, and a high prevalence of anaemia amongst pregnant women.

Against the backdrop of this situation, and following increasing returns of internally displaced persons (IDPs) to their places of habitual residence in retaken areas, CARE, with funding from German Federal Foreign Office (GFFO) has been implementing the project in Duhok, Anbar & Mosul to improve maternal and child health in return areas. The project implementation period was January 01, 2019 to December 31, 2019.

Purpose of the Evaluation
The purpose of this evaluation was to assess post intervention situation of the targeted area against indicators mentioned in the project document. The findings will help CARE to measure the impact of project. The findings will be used to compare the baseline situation with the end-line situation to assess the changes in knowledge, attitudes and practices, of the targeted population and impact of the interventions.

The evaluation identified, and documented lessons learnt and made recommendations for CARE-Iraq and project partners to improve future project implementation as well as strengthen the design of future related projects.

Objectives of the Evaluation
The evaluation was expected to:
1. Assess the relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, impact and sustainability of the project;
2. Generate lessons that will inform SRMH programming in Iraq and in the broader context of GFFO.

Read More...

Pathways endline global report

This 110 page evaluation shows TANGO's endline findings on CARE's Pathways findings from the global ... Read More...

Kutch Livelihood and Education Advancement Project (KLEAP) Endline Report

This endline study was an attempt for measuring the extent to which the stated goals and objectives of the K-LEAP had met and contributed towards increasing the income of the families, thereby resulting in improving the quality of the life. As highlighted across various sections of the report, it was observed that involvement in K-LEAP positively impacted the life of participants and also increased their household income. Various initiatives undertaken as a part of K-LEAP are sustainable and have the potential to be replicated in future. [65 pages] Read More...

Kore Lavi Title II Program Haiti – Midterm Evaluation

This reports presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations related to the Kore Lavi mid-term evaluation.

DESCRIPTION OF KORE LAVI. Kore Lavi’s Theory of Change holds that positive and lasting transformation must happen within interrelated domains: (1) where the effective social safety net programming and complementary services reach the most vulnerable populations and protect their access to food while building self-reliance; (2) that achieve breadth and depth in behavior and social change needed to tackle under-nutrition among vulnerable women and children; and (3) that institutionalize accountability, transparency and quality of delivery for mutually reinforcing social protection programs under the leadership of MAST.

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY. The evaluation employed three data collection methodologies: document review, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions.

PRIMARY FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS.
At the time of the MTE, Kore Lavi had completed data collection in 16 communes demonstrating the ability to adapt and innovate to address the initial data quality problems that existed at the beginning of the program.

In terms of its implementation on the ground, the food voucher scheme is operating well in identifying voucher recipients and enrolling them in the program, distributing food to beneficiaries via paper or electronic vouchers, recruiting and managing the network of collaborating vendors, enforcing policies governing the scheme and overseeing operations. Food received by beneficiary households from both paper and electronic vouchers is inevitably shared with non-household members, including neighbors and even strangers. The VSLA scheme has effectively provided a mechanism by which large numbers of vulnerable women and men living in program communities can save and access small loans at reasonable interest rates to invest in their businesses or children’s education or for other purposes.

SO3 social behavioral change communications interventions are, on the whole, well designed and well implemented. Care Groups, moreover, appear to be an effective methodology for mobilizing women and communicating critical SBCC messages. Community health agents and Lead Mothers play a critical role in SO3 activities. While they are, for the most part, doing a good job and are satisfied with their roles, they also have a number of legitimate concerns related to the lack of monetary compensation and reimbursement for expenses incurred. The program has done a good job identifying and reaching the targeted women and infants.

Kore Lavi has taken a holistic approach to gender integration from design to implementation and has made a conscious and good faith effort to integrate gender considerations in each of the four program SOs.

Kore Lavi has prioritized information management and has demonstrated a clear institutional interest in improving knowledge and learning.

Read More...

Improving health and nutrition for vulnerable women and children (Muskoka ARNI)

This 89 page evaluation shows the impacts and progress of the ARNI project funded through the Muskok... Read More...

Kore lavi market study branded report – 20-02-17x

This 62 page document highlights the market impacts of the USID-funded Kore Lavi program, which uses... Read More...

Kore Lavi: School Feeding Program How to Improve Program and Lower Costs

This report is based off of fieldwork conducted between May 29th and August 9th in Haiti of Jade Womack, a Master’s student in Applied Economics Management at Cornell University under the Cornell-CARE collaboration. The author, or referred to as “researcher,” was interning on behalf of CARE USA in CARE Haiti as a Research Fellow for the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University. The findings of this report do not represent the views of CARE USA, CARE Haiti, or Cornell University and should be considered solely the work and views of the researcher. The researcher investigated the School Feeding Program in Thomassique and Cerca La Source which was part of the SO2 component of the Kore Lavi Program–a USAID sponsored program enacted by CARE Haiti. The report includes detailed information on the demographics of vendors, agriculture in Haiti, profit margins, cost reduction calculations, vendor perceptions, and recommendations. The researcher had two guiding questions, the first as to what could be improved in the program, and the second on how to reduce the cost of the program. The researcher interviewed vendors from 3 of the participating 6 schools: NGE, PDR, and RiO which are all in Thomassique region. Read More...

COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis Global Trends June 2020

In the three months since CARE released its first Rapid Gender Analysis of COVID-19, the situation has evolved quickly and spread globally. CARE has continued to closely monitor this situation, by conducting context-specific analyses in 5 regions covering 64 countries. This has included conversations and data collection with more than 4,500 women.
This new analysis confirms the initial findings and predictions of the first analysis. It also reveals new areas of high priority for women and girls—and for men and boys—as the crisis deepens. Our recent research reveals:
• The highest immediate priorities 3 months into the crisis are food, income, and rights—including concerns around Gender Based Violence, caregiving burdens, and mobility. Women and girls show these needs most acutely, but they also rise to the top of men and boys’ priorities in COVID-19.
• Women’s burdens are increasing. As frontline workers in the health system, as survivors of Gender Based Violence, as the people primarily responsible for food, cleaning, and childcare—especially with schools closed, women confirm that their burdens are rising, and so is the stress around them.
• Women are displaying remarkable leadership, but are still unable to access most decision-making, around COVID-19 and around daily life. They are also quickly approaching the end of their safety nets.
In this context, this document provides updated recommendations to focus on lessening the immediate impact on women and providing the chance to build back equal. These recommendations cluster around:
• Urgently addressing top priorities of food, income, and rights by expanding safety nets—both in the immediate response and in long-term ways for all people to provide their own food and livelihoods.
• Reducing women’s burdens by providing extra support for caregiving, services for GBV prevention and response, and investing in women healthcare workers.
• Prioritizing women’s leadership by creating space for women leaders at all levels of the response, and consistently listening to women’s perspectives and data as the crisis evolves.
Read More...

Improved bean varieties increase yields by 250 percent prosade

This research report on the action research of conservation agriculture practices whos how every $1 ... Read More...

To search for projects containing a specific term, type the term in the search box above and click enter.

Filter Evaluations

To sort evaluations by Country, Language, Evaluation Type, Approval Status, Keywords and Sectors, set the dropdown lists above and click the "Apply Filter" button.