Inclusive Governance

Enhancing Social Protection by Empowering CSOs in Bosnia and Herzegovina

This report is the summary of the findings and recommendations by the team of the evaluators (Zlatko Sarić and Mirna Dabić Davidović) within the evaluation of the project “Enhancing Social Protection by Empowering CSOs in Bosnia and Herzegovina. “The main purpose of the evaluation is to capture findings of the process and make recommendations for potential future programmatic engagement in similar actions. The evaluation was carried out in the period October-December 2020.
The project implementation period is from May 2018 until December 2020 and it was carried out in different geographical areas across Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Project was implemented by CARE International in cooperation with 7 partner Civil Society Organisations that work with different marginalized groups. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Um Rakuba Camp and Tunaydbah Settlement, Eastern Sudan April 2021

Since 9 November 2020, Ethiopian and Eritrean asylum seekers have been arriving in Eastern Sudan, fleeing a military escalation in the Tigray region in northern Ethiopia. Eastern Sudan is facing multiple challenges including high levels of food insecurity, flood recovery, increased militarisation on the Sudan and Ethiopia border, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic and the impacts of mitigation and containment measures. As of 17th April (latest situation report), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Government’s Commissioner for Refugees (COR) registered 62,850 individuals who have crossed the border into Eastern Sudan. It is estimated that 36% of the arrivals are female and 64% are male. Further estimations show that 27% of the arrivals are children (0-17years); out of which 8% are below 5 years. Elderly (+60years) comprise 4% and Adults (18-59 years) 69% of the arrivals. Of those who arrived, data as of January 2021, showed 15,056 are women and girls of reproductive age and 1,365 currently pregnant women. Primary data collection, through FGDs, KIIs and Individual Stories, took place between 16-18th February 2021, in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement.

RGA objectives were to:
• Better understand, the main needs, priorities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys,
as well as at-risk groups in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement
• Identify how CARE and the wider humanitarian community can adapt and design targeted services
and assistance to meet these needs, ensuring we do no harm. Read More...

CROSS-BORDER MIGRATION INTO INDIA AND DEVELOPMENT – Advocacy Paper

The migration discourse has not remained confined to focusing upon the mobility of people from low income countries to high income countries. There has been growing attention to migration from higher-income countries to lower-income countries. The current literature, however, is increasingly taking note of human movements within any of the two regions – the higher income countries and the lower income countries, also described as the global north and the global south respectively. Based on the level of development of the countries of origin and destination, the United Nations has therefore identified a typology of two inter-regional and two intra-regional streams of contemporary international migration: south-north and north-south, south-south and north-north (United Nations 2013). This typology also subsumes the category of a transit country in its roles of being an origin and a destination country at the same time. [26 Pages] Read More...

Community Scorecard in Emergencies Learning Brief

To be effective and equitable towards global populations, humanitarian organizations must adhere to the core standards and principles on quality humanitarian response. Since the inception of ideas on the centrality of local participation in aid in the early 2000s and the more recent evolution of that concept into accountability towards affected populations, the humanitarian community has sought to turn this doctrine into reality.
Accountability in humanitarian response requires that organizations carry out their efforts in an ethically and legally responsible manner that is inclusive of the communities they are seeking to serve. Of UNICEF’s nine Core Humanitarian Standards (depicted here to the right), three specifically refer to mechanisms of accountability towards affected peoples: response is based on communication, participation and feedback; complaints are welcome and addressed; actors continuously learn and improve. In practice this could include centralizing the voices of affected peoples by engaging communities in needs and performance assessments and decision-making. Achieving this is often hindered by the constraints inherent to conflict settings such as lack of localization of assistance, communication between actors, and exploration of needs.
CARE’s Community Score Card
Seeking to actualize these principles of community participation and accountability into our programming, CARE developed the Community Score Card as part of a project aimed at developing innovative and sustainable models to improve health services. Working in crisis settings requires an understanding of the lived experiences of people, the power dynamics, and micro-politics that inform humanitarian response approaches. It also requires bridging the gap between civil society organizations, local and national governments, international non-governmental organizations, and impacted communities. Social accountability approaches do this by connecting citizens with those responsible for providing services. The Community Score Card (CSC) is a participatory social accountability mechanism for assessment, planning, monitoring and evaluation of services. Designed for ease of use and adaptation into any sector with a service delivery scenario, the CSC brings together users and providers of a particular service or program to jointly identify service utilization and provision challenges, mutually generate solutions, and work in partnership to implement and track the effectiveness of those solutions in an ongoing process of quality improvement. The CSC has five phases: (I) planning and preparation; (II) conducting the scorecard with the community; (III) conducting the scorecard with service providers; (IV) interface meeting where the all parties present their findings in the presence of duty-bearers and then jointly develop action plans; and (V) monitoring of the action plans and evaluation of overall process. Read More...

WAYREP Baseline Report


WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence (LFFV) in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID 19) not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. WAYREP is built on the hypothesis that Gender Based Violence (GBV) has two main drivers: gender inequality and poverty. This is exacerbated by displacement whether as a refugee or as an urban dweller coming from rural Uganda. WAYREP’s theory of change therefore states that: if refugee and vulnerable Ugandan women and girls have access to dignified livelihood opportunities, and if the gender, social and cultural norms that perpetuate GBV are challenged and minimized, then the likelihood of resorting to negative coping mechanisms - including GBV like early and forced marriage or commercial sex - will significantly reduce and women and girls’ self- reliance will increase.
The project seeks to achieve four result areas namely;
1. Enhanced sustainable and dignified livelihood for women and youth
2. Reduction of the acceptance of GBV
3. Enhanced psychosocial support to survivors of GBV
4. Increased accountability of the Government of Uganda (GoU) on the implementation of relevant
frameworks for women and girls’ protection and rights
The project is being implemented in Gulu Municipality (Pece and Bardege Divisions), Arua Municipality (River Oli Division, Omugo Settlement zones 4, 5, and 6) and Omugo Sub-county (in Obi, Angazi, Anufira, Duku, Boora and Ndapi Parishes).
This report is 81 pages long. Read More...

BASELINE SURVEY REPORT WOMEN’S VOICES AND LEADERSHIP PROJECT (CENTRAL EQUATORIA, EASTERN EQUATORIA & JONGLEI STATES)

CARE South Sudan, with funding from Global Affairs Canada, implements the Women’s Voice and Leadership (WVL) project in the Eastern Equatorial, Central Equatorial and Jonglei states. WVL is a four-year project that supports the capacity and activities of local and national women-led organizations (WLO) seeking to empower women and girls, advance the protection of women and girls’ rights and achieve gender equality.
The baseline survey purposely informs the establishment of realistic and achievable targets and provides a point of reference against which progress on or towards the achievement of outcomes will be assessed, monitored and evaluated. This will also inform project implementation performance review process, maintain accountability by informing what difference the project is making and provide justification to the stakeholders for programme intervention. The study was also used to assess the political economy that underpins the operating environment for WLOs. The findings and recommendations of the baseline will help to provide strategic and operational guide to shape the implementation process. Read More...

WOMEN’S VOICE AND LEADERSHIP (WVL) KENYA Project Baseline

This report presents a synthesis of findings from the baseline evaluation carried out for the Women’s Voice and Leadership program in Kenya. This program is funded by Global Affairs Canada (GAC) and is being delivered by CARE Canada, CARE Kenya, Uraia Trust, The Centre for Rights Education and Awareness (CREAW), Community Advocacy and Awareness (CRAWN Trust) and Urgent Action Fund (UAF- Africa). The program’s goal is to support the capacity and activities of local and national women’s organizations and movements seeking to empower women and girls, advance the protection of women’s and girls’ rights, and achieve gender equality with the ultimate outcome being the “increased enjoyment of human rights by women and girls and the enjoyment of gender equality in Kenya”. The overall objectives of the baseline were to provide: 1) the baseline data for the WVL Kenya project indicators against which progress will be measured, and 2) provide recommendations on improving the current project Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) and Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) Plan.
The baseline employed a mixed methodology approach, combining both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The study was undertaken in a feasible manner given the COVID 19 reality and associated safety precautions, limitations on movement and convening. The study findings drew analysis from secondary data, self-assessment questionnaires, key informant interviews and quantitative interviews through phone calls. The study engaged a wide range of stakeholders including: women’s rights organizations (WROs), women rights’ network members, staff of the 4 partner organizations and CARE staff. All the network members engaged were female as well as 83% of representatives of WROs and partners. Slightly above half (53%) of WROs representatives engaged were organization leaders while 86% of partner representatives were staff. Read More...

ENDLINE EVALUATION COVER PAGE Adolescent Empowerment Project (AEP) IN KAJIADO & MUKURU

CARE implemented the Adolescent Empowerment Project (AEP) in Kenya, funded through the Patsy Collins Trust Fund Initiative from 2015 to 2020. The project aimed to empower adolescent girls and boys from chronically insecure households to fully exploit their potential, take advantage of opportunities, and fulfil their aspirations. Over a 5-year implementation period, the project targeted adolescents (aged 10-19) in urban Mukuru (within Nairobi county) and rural Kajiado county with a suite of activities and services delivered through partners Hope Worldwide Kenya (HWWK) and Neighbors Initiative Alliance (NIA). Inputs were designed to expand life choices and empower participants to become engaged citizens and include activities on leadership skills development, adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ARSH), economic empowerment, ICT skills, and quality education.
This report is 70 pages long. Read More...

“Political Economy Analysis for food and nutrition security and community resilience, and analysis of conflicts affecting food, nutrition and income security in Harande program area” Integrated Report

The major findings of this twofold study firstly highlight peaceful as well as contentious coexistence between formal institutions put in place with decentralization and informal and customary institutions managing resources essential to food and nutrition security. Stemming from a centuries-old tradition based on the right of the first occupant, the paramount importance of lineage and family, strict intra-community differentiation of socio- professional categories both in the management of pastoral resources and fisheries in Delta flooded areas and farming in dry areas, these customary institutions are still greatly relevant and legitimate in the eyes of the different communities today. Conversely, these communities often find it difficult to grasp the legal principles and norms (State land domain, local communities’ responsibilities, local governance, the role of deconcentrated State officials etc.) supporting local governments’ role in resource management. Consequently, the implementation of the Harande Program should be guided by the socio-cultural specifities of the target areas and should take into account the customary conflict management mechanisms as well as those promoted by civil society organizations which are the most validated by populations in the region of Mopti. The report is 140 pages long. Read More...

Supporting Meaningful Civic Engagement for Improved Accountability by Leveraging Digital Technologies Baseline Assessment

The baseline assessment for the “Supporting meaningful civic engagement for improved accountability by leveraging digital technologies” project was conducted to develop values for baseline indicators and provide evidence with regards to the degree of satisfaction and level of dialogue target beneficiary groups have with public service providers. Data from this baseline assessment will enable comparisons between start, during the course of the project and at the end of project. Donor for this project is the European Union via European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR).
The overall objective for this Action is to develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels and ensure public access to information and fundamental freedoms. The overall objectives will be achieved through activities, which empower young ethnic minority community citizens to demand the government for more participatory, transparent, responsive and accountability in leveraging digital technologies. We will use a digital scorecard, which is currently tested and will be applied in 2021 in this project. Report is 53 pages long. Read More...

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