Agriculture

Women’s involvement in coffee agroforestry value- chains Financial training, village savings and loans associations, and decision power in Northwest Vietnam

Colleagues in Vietnam and at CCAFS and the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) carried out some research on our work in the coffee value chain (TEAL).

This study assessed VSLA impacts and related training on gender equality and women’s access to coffee markets in an ongoing coffee- project in northwest Vietnam.

Applying the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI), women rated perceptions of their decision-making over a range of 18 tasks related to household and agricultural responsibilities and use of income and social activities (over 18 months). There were improvements in decision-making power in categories with previously low participation and increased sharing of domestic responsibilities (biggest gains were decision-making over large purchases and use of income). Also found that husbands to women in the study embraced more equal sharing of responsibility and decision-making with their wives.
This report is 40 pages long. Read More...

A Win-Win for Gender and Nutrition: Testing A Gender-Transformative Approach From Asia In Africa

Since 2016, CARE Burundi has partnered with Great Lakes Inkingi Development (GLID), RBU2000, and the University of Burundi/Agronomy department and the Africa Center for Gender, Social Research and Impact Assessment to implement and test the EKATA approach – Empowerment through Knowledge And Transformative Action – integrated into an agriculture program to test its effectiveness against a typical gender mainstreaming approach (Gender Light) and a Control (with agriculture interventions only) in a modified randomized control trial, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The Win-Win project randomly assigned collines to EKATA, Gender Light and Control groups. Baseline data was collected in 2016 – Midterm was conducted in 2018, and end-line data was collected in 2020 from a random sample of 1,315 households and 1,849 individuals (1,059 female heads of household, and 790 male heads of household). Additionally, the project conducted 36 individual in-depth interviews, disaggregated by sex and age – and male- or female-headed households – at baseline, midline and end-line. This data was complimented with focus group discussions (FGDs). The evaluation looked at the impact of EKATA compared with Gender
Light and Control on several areas, including rice production (which was the main focus crop), income and wealth, gender equality and women’s empowerment. The cost-effectiveness of these approaches also was analyzed. The evaluation used the project level Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (Pro-WEAI) to measure changes in gender equality and women’s empowerment. Read More...

Evaluation a mi-parcours du Programme d’Amenagement du Delta Interieur du Niger (PADIN-II)

The Development Program of the Inner Niger Delta (PADIN-II) is the result of a request from the National Directorate of Rural Engineering (DNGR, for the Ministry of Agriculture) to respond to the planning guidelines of the Program. of Sustainable Development of the Inner Niger Delta (PDD-DIN). PADIN-II is designed by the NGO CARE and the DNGR, with the involvement of members of the Regional Committee for the Orientation, Coordination and Monitoring of Development Actions (CROCSAD) of the Mopti Region. This five-year program (2013-18) is funded by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Bamako. CARE-Mali is implementing it in 24 Communes in the Mopti Region. It is preceded by PADIN-I (2011-13) and the Food Security through Promotion of Irrigation project (SAPI 2007-11), for which CARE was also responsible. PADIN is therefore part of a history of the development and management of wetlands in the Mopti region. The report is 85 pages long. Read More...

Evaluation finale du Programme d’Amenagement du Delta Interieur du Niger (PADIN-II)


The Inner Niger Delta Development Program (PADIN-II) in the Mopti Region has been implemented in 24 Communes classified as vulnerable in four Circles of the Mopti Region in Mali. The program, lasting more than five years (Sept. 2013-June 2019), was implemented by a number of stakeholders: technical services and governorate, municipal authorities, NGOs and farmers' organizations. The NGO CARE-Mali was the main operator of the program, which was funded by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Bamako to the amount of 7.87 billion FCFA. The goal was to improve the living conditions of 20,000 households (or 120,000 people) of agro-pastoralists and fishermen in the Inner Niger Delta (DIN) and Sourou. The report is 104 pages long. Read More...

“Political Economy Analysis for food and nutrition security and community resilience, and analysis of conflicts affecting food, nutrition and income security in Harande program area” Integrated Report

The major findings of this twofold study firstly highlight peaceful as well as contentious coexistence between formal institutions put in place with decentralization and informal and customary institutions managing resources essential to food and nutrition security. Stemming from a centuries-old tradition based on the right of the first occupant, the paramount importance of lineage and family, strict intra-community differentiation of socio- professional categories both in the management of pastoral resources and fisheries in Delta flooded areas and farming in dry areas, these customary institutions are still greatly relevant and legitimate in the eyes of the different communities today. Conversely, these communities often find it difficult to grasp the legal principles and norms (State land domain, local communities’ responsibilities, local governance, the role of deconcentrated State officials etc.) supporting local governments’ role in resource management. Consequently, the implementation of the Harande Program should be guided by the socio-cultural specifities of the target areas and should take into account the customary conflict management mechanisms as well as those promoted by civil society organizations which are the most validated by populations in the region of Mopti. The report is 140 pages long. Read More...

Baseline Study of the Food for Peace Development Food Assistance Project in Mali Final

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Food for Peace (FFP) awarded a contract for a development food assistance project in Mali in fiscal year (FY) 2015 to CARE International. The Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience Advancing Nutrition Security, Diversified Livelihoods and Empowerment (HARANDE) Project is implemented by CARE and its partners: Save the Children; Helen Keller International; Yam Giribolo Tumo; Sahel-Eco; and the Research and Technical Applications Group. The goal of the HARANDE Project—which means food security in Peulh—is to provide access to sustainable food, nutrition, and income security for 310,855 vulnerable household members in four districts (Bandiagara, Douentza, Tenenkou, and Youwarou) of the Mopti region in Mali by 2020. FFP contracted ICF to conduct a baseline study of the HARANDE Project in 2016 as the first phase of a pre-post evaluation cycle. The second phase will include a final evaluation, inclusive of an endline survey, in approximately five years. The baseline study includes a representative population-based household survey to collect data for key FFP indicators and a qualitative study to add context, richness, and depth to the findings from the household survey. The report is 434 pages long. Read More...

Learning Women’s Participation in the Cotton Value Chain

The present gender analysis study of the Cotton Value Chain (CVC) was undertaken by CARE India as part of its ongoing three-year project to strengthen CVC in the Vidarbha region of Maharashtra state. The project, operating in the Jalgaon Jamod block of the Buldhana district in Maharashtra, aims to improve the productive engagement of resource-constrained women in resilient and sustainable cotton-based farming. It seeks to empower women smallholders from marginal communities and increase their productivity, income, and living standard to build a strong and sustainable CVC. The gender analysis study was conducted with a view to developing a robust understanding of gender relations, roles, and outcomes as they play out in the CVC of the project area. Read More...

Sustainable Transformation of Egypt’s Aquaculture market System (STREAMS)

The Sustainable Transformation of Egypt’s Aquaculture Market System (STREAMS) project was designed with the overall goal to increase production of inexpensive, nutritious and safe fish from sustainable aquaculture systems to help improve the health and nutrition of Egypt’s resource-poor while creating employment and increasing incomes along the aquaculture value chain. The project was funded by SDC, under domain 2 “Economic Growth” and managed and implemented by WorldFish in partnership with CARE as a sub-contractor and in cooperation with the Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation in five governorates namely: Kafr-El-Sheikh, Fayoum, Behera, Sharkia and Menia. STREAMS was implemented over a period of almost 41 months from December 1, 2015 to April 15, 2019

The end project evaluation identifies and assesses results achieved by WorldFish and partners during the project life at outcome and output levels and draws lessons learned and recommendations for WorldFish, the Donor, project stakeholders and partners. The evaluation was based on both secondary data and use of quantitative and qualitative tools to solicit primary data. Read More...

Partners for Resilience Country Case Study Indonesia (PFR)

This is a report of the findings of the Indonesia Country study which is one of three country studies being prepared as an input to Evaluation of the PFR II programme. For ease of comparison and to facilitate the preparation of the overall report, this country report is structured according to the seven generic Evaluation Questions (and associated Judgement criteria and indicators) that inform this evaluation. In line with PFR 2 programme design, the overall objective of the Indonesia programme is to localise global agendas and commitments aimed at disaster management, climate change adaptation and working with an eco-system approach. It is recognised that each country faces unique challenges, has different institutional, capacity and resource opportunities/ limitations and have prioritised their responses to these global agenda and commitments in different ways. In this respect, contextualisation to local needs and circumstances is critical [87 pages]. Read More...

CARE Mali Harande FY20 Participants Based Survey PaBS Annual Report

Harande program, implemented the annual monitoring survey through the M&E Unit and Program team supported by the CARE USA Regional M&E Advisor. The methodology is based on the Participants Based Survey (PaBS survey) guidelines expressed in Feed the Future PABS guideline1. It has been conducted using the latest BHA participants-based survey methodology guidance. All fourteen (14) annual survey indicators have been computed using weighting procedures. Except for, gross margin, value of incremental and yield indicators that used more complex formulas, standard errors and confidence intervals have been established for the remaining indicators. FY20 Data collection has been made during the period of July 15 - 29, 2020 and methodology comply with the PaBS FtF guideline as recommended by BHA. The PaBS have been implemented in the following four (4) communes: Dourou, Dandoli, Douentza and Koubewel Koundia, and a total of 48 villages have been reached through these communes for data collection.

A total of 1,733 participants have been sampled for this PaBS. Within them 11% refused the survey and 72% were female. That bring the total participant who responded to the survey in all the frames without double counting to 1,529. Participants who overlap between frames during the survey were counted once. It appears that 28% of participants were youth. Out of a total of 1,529 interviewed respondents 1,265 come from households and 18% of them were household heads. The average size of households was 9 members (the number varies from a minimum of 2 to a maximum of 35 household members). [59 pages]. Read More...

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