Sexual|Reproductive Health

Hamenus Mortalidade no Risku ba Inan (HAMORIS – 2017-2021) Midterm Report and Summary CI Timor-Leste

The Hamenus Mortalidade no Risku ba Inan Sira (HAMORIS) project is funded by the Australian Government and implemented by CARE International Timor-Leste. Focused on the municipalities of Ermera and Covalima, the project aims to address the high number of women who die during childbirth in Timor-Leste, which has one of the highest rates of maternal death in the world, by improving their access to and use of quality maternal health services. The HAMORIS project was launched in July 2017 and has been extended until June 2022. This is the midterm report and findings. Please also find a summary in English as well as Tetum. Read More...

Addressing GBV & SRHR Challenges in Bama and Dikwa LGAs in Borno State, Northeast Nigeria

Borno state in Northeast Nigeria has been under frequent attacks in the past decade, which has left several million people insecure, homeless, and without any means of livelihood. Hence, the rate of Gender-based Violence (GBV) continues to increase coupled with lack of awareness and basic infrastructure for promoting Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). To alleviate the challenges faced by several inhabitants of these conflict-affected communities, CARE is implementing a SRHR and GBV project to reach 47,000 vulnerable boys, girls, men and women, living in Internally Displaced Person (IDP) camps and host communities in Bama and Dikwa Local Government Areas (LGAs) in Borno State. This report highlights the current gaps in GBV and SRHR in Bama and Dikwa LGAs to serve as benchmark for measuring progress and guide implementation of the right intervention mix.
In October – November 2019, CARE Nigeria conducted a baseline survey for the project. The study involved administration of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) questionnaires as well as Focus Group Discussions (FGD) and Key Informant Interviews (KII) covering SRHR and GBV to randomly selected men, women, boys and girls in the project communities. Among the interviewed were; community members, representatives of security agencies, camp coordinator and health facility staffs respectively, in Dikwa and Bama LGAs in Borno State. A total of 79 FGDs and 46 KIIs were conducted, in addition to the quantitative survey involving 3,112 participants. Read More...

Rapid Needs Assessment COVID-19 impacts on Urban Health in Bangladesh

Since the initial outbreak of COVID-19 in Bangladesh earlier this March, Bangladesh is at an economic and social standstill due to the government imposed nation-wide lockdown. Although every sector of the country is facing problems, the health sector is currently among the most affected sectors.
The Health Access and Linkage Opportunities for Workers Plus (HALOW+) is directly related to the health sector and is responsible for maintaining the overall health and safety of the people/areas under its intervention. To assess the current situation of the RMG workers of 17 factories and their respective communities under HALOW+ in this pandemic crisis, a small-scale survey study was conducted from 23rd-26th April, 2020. A total of 141 participants from both Community Support Groups (CSG), Urban Low income
people including RMG Workers, Ward Health Development Committee and GO – NGO Coordination Forum, District Managers of Public, Private and NGO health and Family Planning department, Public Health Specialist from UN bodies, INGO and Academic institutes and RMG Factory owner and senior management were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. The study revealed that COVID-19 had a significant impact on the overall health system as a total of 322 health workers out of 516 in Gazipur are currently in home/institutional quarantine, telemedicine facilities have dropped to 80% and there’s a 50% reduction in total patient reported in Upazila Health Complexes (UHC)-reasons being absence of doctors and proper medical facilities. Read More...

Cambodia COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis

The number of COVID-19 cases in Cambodia is quite low (141) however the impact on global supply chains and the livelihood of thousands of factory and migrant workers, who are mostly women, is immense. The loss of income could potentially push families back into poverty and the value of unpaid care work which will increase during the pandemic, is not measured in financial terms, nor seen as a valuable contribution. Additionally, the growth of women’s empowerment which is strongly linked to financial contributions to the household, will decline.

Women and girls in Cambodia face inequalities in many areas such as in employment and payment, division of domestic labour, decision making and participation. Those are likely to further increase in the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. An area of specific concern is in the education of girls and boys, from poor families, who do not have the technical infrastructure and capacity to support online home schooling.

The current health system does not have the capacity to deal with an increasing number of COVID-19 cases. Sub- national health facilities are considered low quality and previous health crisis showed that patients will directly consult provincial and national facilities which is going to exceed their capacity.

There is still uncertainty about transmission of COVID-19 which causes fear and creates potential for rumours causing
stigmatisation and discrimination of certain population groups such as foreigners, women working with foreigners as in bar work and Muslim groups.

Gender based violence is common and widely accepted in Cambodia. Globally, intimate partner violence (IPV) may be the most common type of violence women and girls experience during emergencies. In the context of COVID-19 quarantine and isolation measures, IPV has the potential to dramatically increase for women and girls. Life-saving care and support to GBV survivors may be disrupted when front-line service providers and systems such as health, policing and social welfare are overburdened and preoccupied with handling COVID- 19 cases. Restrictions on mobility also mean that women are particularly exposed to intimate-partner violence at home with limited options for accessing support services. Read More...

Final Performance Evaluation of the Kore Lavi Development Food Assistance Project in Haiti

In FY 2013, the US Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Office of Food for Peace (FFP) issued an award to a consortium of three organizations, CARE, Action Contre La Faim (ACF), and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to implement a Development Food Assistance Project (DFAP). World Vision (WV) later joined the consortium. The four-year project, titled ‘Kore Lavi’ (‘supporting life’ in Haitian Creole) started in August 2013. Following a two-year extension granted in 2017, the projected ended in September 2019.

The overall purpose of Kore Lavi was to support the Haitian Government in creating a social safety net for food and nutrition security that prioritizes consumption of locally grown quality products. The overall goal was to contribute to reducing food insecurity and vulnerability in targeted communities by establishing a replicable safety net system and expanding government capacities to prevent child under nutrition.

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Rapid Gender Analysis: COVID-19 in the United States

The United States, one of the wealthiest countries in the world, also has the highest number of cases of COVID-19 in the world, far surpassing global hotspots like Italy and China, with cases continuing to rise at concerning rates. In this humanitarian crisis, CARE is bringing its global expertise—from more than 75 years of implementing humanitarian responses in more than 100 countries—to the context of COVID-19 in the United States. In addition to its expertise in humanitarian and crisis response, CARE developed the industry-standard Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) that builds upon several efforts by humanitarian actors to bring gender to the forefront of programming. The standardized tool to enable humanitarian actors to quickly build crisis responses that take into account the different needs of people of all genders, as well as disenfranchised groups, the extreme poor, and other groups often overlooked by policy, crisis planning, and data.

Since the start of the COVID-19 crisis, CARE has responded in 67 countries—including the United States—and has published 27 of an anticipated 54 RGAs in contexts around the world. We hope that applying this tool to the specific American context will enable CARE and others to create better responses to the pandemic that meet the needs of all people.

This RGA relies on secondary data collected between May 25 and June 10, 2020. It specifically focuses on highlighting the historic and institutional systems of oppression, gender bias, and racism targeting Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). These structural realities and cultural biases put BIPOC communities, especially the women in these communities, at higher exposure to infection and higher risk of death. Simultaneously, these realities and biases exacerbate the already dire lack of access to basic services (such as health, food, housing, etc) experienced by these communities on a regular basis. This RGA offers policy and institutional recommendations for COVID-19 responses to meet the needs of the most vulnerable and affected communities in the face of systemic race, gender and class-based oppression. Without acknowledging these historic legacies around race, gender, and class in the U.S., the entire nation is at risk of perpetuating longstanding injustices and facing even more severe impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Read More...

Barriers and supports to reducing early child bearing among newly married adolescent girls in Zinder region: A qualitative study

CARE carried out formative research to understand the underlying gender and social norms, barriers to and facilitators for delaying early child birth among married/soon-to-be-married adolescent girls in Zinder region, from the perspective of multiple gatekeepers in the lives of married/soon-to-be-married adolescent girls. Read More...

Adolescent Motherhood: Understanding Individual and Community Perspectives to Delay First Birth in Rural Bangladesh

Globally, more than one third of girls marry before the age of 15. In Bangladesh, like in other developing countries, adolescent marriage is still very common. Early marriage leads to early pregnancy, as young wives are not allowed to make their own decisions about contraceptive use and timing of childbirth, deferring instead to their husbands and extended family. The major objectives of this formative research were to explore the intentions, desires, perspectives, motivators, and de‐motivators around the first pregnancy among married adolescent girls (MAGs). The study also explored ways to delay first pregnancies among MAGs, focusing on influential people in their lives, health providers, and positive deviants. Additionally, we examined alternative opportunities and barriers to delay first pregnancy through pursuit of an alternative life course and the use of modern contraceptives. The findings will be used to design an appropriate intervention for rural Bangladesh. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis CARE Morocco (English, French)

This analysis is based on a qualitative survey carried out in the field with the various beneficiaries of CARE Morocco's projects. A questionnaire was developed for the occasion and completed through phone calls by the field teams in different intervention areas of CIM. It should be noted that the survey did not focus on a large number of respondents, but rather on qualitative responses with the leaders of CARE Morocco beneficiary groups such as Village Savings and Loans Associations, cooperatives, educators from the education sector, and other partner associations at the local level. Secondary data were also drawn from various national reports and studies, in particular those conducted by the High Commission for Planning and the National Observatory for Human Development. Read More...

Final Project End-line assessment of Shelter, NFI, Hygiene, SRHR and Livelihood Support for Disaster-Affected Populations in Afghanistan 2018-2020

The Emergency Shelter, NFI, Hygiene, SRHR and Livelihood Support for Disaster-Affected Populations in Afghanistan 2018-2020 Project aims to provide emergency assistance to the identified beneficiaries settled in Kabul, Parwan, Kapisa, Balkh, Ghazni, Khost and Paktya provinces of Afghanistan. The interventions covered under this project included Shelter, NFI, WASH, Livelihoods and SRHR needs of the women, men, boys and girls affected by disasters. The sample of 352 households for this end line evaluation was structured as according to the proportion beneficiaries per the different project outputs The two main output blocks of hygiene/SRHR on the one hand and different forms of cash and NFI support on the other are well captured in the end line survey. In addition to the quantitative approach, 8 FGDs, 7 KIIs and 3 IDIs conducted were conducted with the project beneficiaries, stakeholders and the GAC project team.
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