Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Integrated WASH Implementation Models for Neglected Tropical Diseases

In February 2015, CARE, supported by Johnson & Johnson, initiated the Integrated Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Implementation Models for Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) Prevention project (I-WASH/NTDs) to investigate barriers to and success in WASH and NTD collaboration. The project was initiated to support the government of Ethiopia in its efforts to combat NTDs that are endemic to 746 woredas nationally.

As a part of this pilot, supported by Johnson & Johnson, CARE has added NTD prevention elements and activities to its longstanding water, sanitation and hygiene program in the South Gondar Zone of the Amhara region. Thus, in addition to improving WASH access and behaviors, the I-WASH/NTD program helped CARE and partners to focus deliberately on NTD prevention and work with government and other relevant stakeholders to ensure a holistic approach to NTD prevention and control. Key program elements included increased access to WASH, support for mass drug administration, increased knowledge and practice of specific prevention behaviors at the community-level and increased coordination between local government offices, community members, and health and research institutions working in WASH and NTD prevention and control. Read More...

Gender Analysis: Prevention and Response to Ebola Virus Disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo

The latest epidemic of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has rapidly evolved into the second largest outbreak in history. Deployed in an operational environment characterised by ongoing volatility, EVD prevention, treatment and containment efforts have faced multiple difficulties. Mistrust of EVD responders by local communities, coupled with targeted attacks on healthcare workers and facilities, have proved to be serious operational challenges. Despite a gressive efforts to stamp out the disease across three provinces, the virus has continued to spread and is responsible for the deaths of 3,303 people to date (as of 24th November 2019) with an overall fatality rate of 67%.

However, these casualty numbers hide the underlying characteristics of the EVD crisis. The reality is that the majority of fatalities consist of women (56%), and children (28%). Adult men constitute just 11% of EVD deaths. Yet fatalities alone do not fully demonstrate the differential ways in which men, women, boys and girls are exposed and experience the immediate risks and longer-term consequences of the disease. Socially prescribed cultural norms, attitudes and practices in relation to gender and age dictate how individual women, men, girls and boys are differentially impacted by the EVD crisis. It is therefore critical to better understand the socio-behavioural underpinnings to EVD aetiology. In light of the gendered dimensions of the EVD crisis, CARE International in DRC commissioned a Gender Analysis of the EVD crisis in North Kivu in order to provide information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys during the EVD crisis. Read More...

Better Governance for Education End of Project Evaluation Report

Better Governance for Education (BG4E) is a 4 year project (July 2016 – June 2020) funded by the Australian Government’s ‘Australian NGO Cooperation Program’ (ANCP) with a total budget of 1.7 million Australian dollars. It is a pilot project that aims to develop and test a model that shows that better governance (and therefore better decision-making, resource allocation, project implementation oversight, monitoring & evaluation) results in improved service delivery. BG4E is based on CARE International’s Governance Framework, which states that if marginalised citizens are empowered, if power-holders are effective, accountable and responsive, and if spaces for negotiation are created, expanded, effective and inclusive, then sustainable and equitable development can be achieved, particularly for marginalised women and girls. The project worked intensively in four school communities, within the Obura Wanenera District, and at sub-national level in 3 districts (Obura Wonenara, Okapa and Lufa) within Eastern Highlands Province.

The evaluation focused on answering four key evaluation questions:

1) IMPACT - Has improved gender inclusive governance led to better service delivery in education?

2) MODEL - Has this project produced a proven or promising approach?

3) RELEVANCE - How relevant is the project to the policy context?

4) SUSTAINABILITY - Are the outcomes and impacts likely to be sustained after the end of the project? Read More...

Final Evaluation Report: ENSURING ACCESS TO DRINKING WATER, CLEAN ENVIRONMENT AND GOOD HYGIENE IN WEST MOSUL, IRAQ

With the objective of providing vulnerable women, men, boys and girls in conflict-affected, underserved and epidemic-prone communities and improving civic participation of local residents, CARE’s interventions targeted highly prioritized areas of West Mosul in need of installation and rehabilitation of water supply systems through close collaboration with the Directorate of Water (DoW) as the local authorities are currently overwhelmed by the scale of needs to enable affected populations to return home.

With this project, CARE addressed three critical gaps in water rehabilitation systems and services in West Mosul by:
• the rehabilitation of water supply system,
• solid waste management, and
• community engagement through establishing hygiene volunteers and water committees.

The endline evaluation seeks to analyze the endline values for key WASH indicators as stated in the project documents in the targeted areas and to assess, impact and effectiveness of programming to successfully track accomplishments of the WASH project, relevance and sustainability of the project after the implementation through the usage of quantitative and qualitative data. The evaluation also looked into areas of success as well as challenges faced implementing activities in Al-Matahin and Al-Islah neighborhoods of West Mosul.

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Umeed-e-Nau Project Health and WASH Support project for drought affect people of Umerkot, Sindh

This report present the external evaluation of Umeed-e-Nau project - Health and WASH Support project for drought affect people of Umerkot, Sindh. The project was implemented by CARE International in Pakistan (CIP) through its partner CWSA under UNOCHA’s PHPF-III from February – December 2019.

The evaluation of the CIP’s Umeed-e-Nau project has been carried out as per the DAC criteria such as Relevance/appropriateness, Effectiveness, Efficiency, Impact and Sustainability. However, CIP has included an additional criteria i.e. Project Management.

Findings of the final evaluation indicate that CIP rightly identified the needs in holistic manner, as the people in the target area were struggling for water and vulnerable to different health related hazards. The community appreciated all the project activities particularly the MMCs due to quality services, equipment and medicines. Innovations introduced by CIP and donor’s flexibility to understand and approve required changes was also an important factor for paving a smooth path towards achieving successful results of the project. The capacity building and awareness raising activities like health & hygiene training, nutrition awareness has inbuilt sustainability. In both WASH and Health interventions, the impact on behaviors and practice can be observed with passage of time. The trend of use of latrines, water filtrations, consultation with qualified health practitioners, realization of importance of health care especially maternal health and last but not the least hygiene awareness are likely to impact positively on beneficiaries’ individual and communal lives for many years.

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Humanitarian Project in South Waziristan Tribal District (SWTD): End of Project Evaluation Report

Over five million persons were displaced from the tribal districts of ex-FATA region over the last decade. Over 90% of these persons have now returned and face massive humanitarian needs. CARE International in Pakistan (CIP) is implementing a humanitarian project in SWTD focused on WASH activities. In October 2019, CIP commissioned a joint independent evaluation to assess its relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability. The evaluation collected information through a desk review of key documents, 9 FGDs and 200 household interviews with men and women in the project locations, 6 key informant interviews and physical observations. Overall, the quality and impact of the project is high, which is especially commendable given the extremely challenging work environment and external constraints. Read More...

CARE International in Pakistan (CIP) Humanitarian Project in North Waziristan Tribal District (NWTD): End of Project Evaluation Final Report

Over five million persons from the tribal districts of ex-FATA region were displaced over the last decade. Over 90% of these persons have now returned and face massive humanitarian needs. CARE International in Pakistan (CIP) implemented a humanitarian project in NWTD through a local partner (PRDS) focused on WASH and shelter. In October 2019, CIP commissioned an independent evaluation of the project to assess its relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability. The evaluation collected information through a desk review of key documents, 8 FGDs and 200 household interviews with men and women in the project locations, 8 key informant interviews and physical observations. Overall, the quality and impact of the project is high, which is especially commendable given the extremely challenging work environment and external constraints. Read More...

Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) phase III & Improving Living Condition and Mitigating Monsoon Risk for the Refugees: Endline Study Report

CARE Bangladesh has partnered with IOM since November 2017 as Site Management Support Agency in Camp 16 (Potibunia) and since 01 January 2019 in Camp 13 of Ukhia upazila of Cox’s Bazar District.

A joint End-line assessment was conducted in both camps being site managed and coordinated by CARE Bangladesh (Camps 13 and 16) with the support from IOM and IRW. In addition, Shelter and WASH component were also supported by these two donors for selected HH. The purpose of this end-line study was to provide measurable data against project targets, indicators, outcomes and objectives, as well as to help prioritize activities and focus of work across the two locations.

Overall, the situation seemed improved more in camp 16 than in camp 13 followed by CARE intervention which was at the same level in the baseline. . Participation in decision making process block wise in both camps increased almost by 39%. 95% of respondents said that site development activity was done in last month that indicates the value of work actually ongoing. On the shelter response almost 66% responded they are having good quality shelter. Access to enough water for household need and water treatment stratus before drinking increased simultaneously in a good way. Open defecation is still having a concerning issues in both camp. A variety of factors might explain these differences that explained with deeper analysis in this report. Read More...

Where the Rain Falls Phase III (2017 – 2019): Final Evaluation Report

In 2009, the Where the Rain Falls (WtRF) initiative started as a three-year research project investigating the impact of rainfall variability on food and livelihood security, and migration.

This research culminated in a global policy report (2012) and the development of more action-oriented community-based adaptation (CBA) pilot projects in each India, Thailand and Bangladesh. A second phase (2014 – 2016), and later a third phase (2017 – 2019), aimed to scale results, impacts and lessons learned to date for broader support for, and uptake of, CBA methods and approaches.

In October 2019, CARE France engaged an International Consultant to lead WtRF’ first multi-county evaluation. As per the Terms of Reference (TORs) for this evaluation (see Annex IV) the main objectives of the evaluation are two-fold:
(i) to assess the degree of achievement of the WtRF global and specific objectives in India and Thailand respectively; and
(ii) to extract common and/or comparable lessons learned about factors contributing to and hindering achievements (e.g. barriers and enablers) Read More...

Supporting Partnerships and Resilience of Communities (SPARC) in Northern Rakhine State End-of-Project Evaluation

The Supporting Partnerships and Resilience of Communities (SPARC) project, with funding from the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), was implemented in Maungdaw District, northern Rakhine State between December 2011- December 2019.

SPARC’s goal is to contribute to the sustainable reduction of poverty in communities through improving the social and economic position of poor, vulnerable households, and to strengthen household and community capacity to sustain such improvements. To achieve this goal, CARE implements integrated livelihood activities that improve food security and economic opportunities, including community forestry, crop productivity intensification, facilitating access to education and introducing financial services through Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLA).

An end-of-project evaluation was recently commissioned ‘to determine if SPARC achieved its end of project outcomes of sustainable reduction of poverty in poor, vulnerable communities and strengthened household and community capacity to sustain such improvements’.

The evaluation used a mixed method approach combining a literature review and quantitative data sets drawn primarily from the project monitoring system, together with qualitative data, collected using participatory approaches such as focus group discussions (FGD), key informant interviews (KII), and Stories of Change Interviews (SoCs). Read More...

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