refugees

Host Community Situation Analysis Impact of Rohingya Influx on Host Communities in Ukhia and Teknaf

Bangladesh became host to what is now the biggest refugee camp in the whole world. By November 2017 836,487 FDMN (Forcefully Displaced Myanmar Nationals) fled across the Myanmar-Bangladesh border to settle here mostly in two Upazilas:Ukhia and Teknaf of Cox's Bazar district. By January 2018, it became clear that this would be a prolonged crisis lasting years as the Myanmar government continued dithering about taking them back, and as also the FDMN expressed their unwillingness to go back fearing persecution. As a result of this huge and sudden influx, lives and livelihoods of the host communities have been affected in many ways. Therefore, this Situational Assessment aims to assess both the visible economic and the subtle social impacts of the recent influx on the host communities. Using Oxford’s integration conceptual framework, this assessment has been conducted to chalk out CARE Bangladesh’s future response to the refugee crisis by involving the host communities in the process and addressing their concerns so that the tension between the two communities is defused rather than intensified.
Presence of the refugees has brought about many social and economic changes creating massive pressure on the host communities. Economic activities in the two upazilas have gone through transitions, leading to the emergence of a new market system and reducing employment opportunities for the host communities.
On one hand prices of essentials have shot up almost twice as much, and on the other, due to an unpredictably large number of refugees entering the local labor market wages for day laborers have gone down. Though refugees are living in highly congested camps, they are getting aid materials as well as economic opportunity in the local market. On the contrary, the host communities are finding themselves pitted against the refugees as either their work have been taken away or their earnings significantly reduced. It is true that a few locally influential people owning large tracts of land and businesses are benefitting from the availability of cheap labor, but the poor and the ultra-poor from the host communities are bearing the brunt of these changes. Access to administrative, educational and healthcare needs has diminished. Reduced access and availability of CPR-resultant scarcity of timber, bamboo for shelter, food & cooking fuel created insecurity of accessing resources. Due to security risk of woman and girls mobility has goes down, women income earning opportunity getting reduced; all of this has evidently created tension between the host and the refugee communities and within host community households. If left unaddressed, this tension is likely to rise to the extent of creating potential threats of ethnic conflicts.
In response to these findings of the situational analysis possible types of interventions could be Gender specific livelihoods strengthening initiatives based on diversification of off/on farm activities, Transformative approach to build life free from GBV, Promoting youth leadership and Strengthening service delivery and demand side functions through Inclusive governance.
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Beyond four walls and a roof Reflections on the multi-sectoral One Neighbourhood Approach for Syrian Refugees and Host Communities, Tripoli, Lebanon.

The Syrian Civil War, now in its tenth year, has displaced millions of Syrians, both within Syria and into neighbouring countries. Over one million Syrian refugees reside in northern Lebanon, including in the city of Tripoli. This large scale displacement has placed additional strain on housing and services; refugees and vulnerable host communities frequently reside in informal, poor-quality homes in various states of disrepair that are poorly serviced and often damp and damaged. With displacement ongoing, many humanitarian programmes seek to meet the needs of both refugees and address underlying causes of poverty in host communities. These programmes are often multi-sectoral and have social cohesion as an intended outcome and deliver community-wide protection activities alongside housing and WASH support.
With four phases over four years funded by the US Government’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM), the ONA programme has worked to improve housing conditions for the most vulnerable whilst enhancing individual and community resilience and social cohesion through protection programming and participatory approaches. In Phase IV (2018-19), CARE International in Lebanon (CIL) aimed to build on Phases I to III. In common with previous phases, for Phase IV, CIL worked in partnership with local partner Akkarouna to provide multi-sectoral shelter, WASH and Protection assistance to vulnerable Syrian refugees and the Lebanese host community, including Palestinians returning from Syria (PRS) in five neighbourhoods in Tripoli Read More...

WASH, PROTECTION AND SRHR SUPPORT TO IDPS AND RETURNEES IN IRAQ 2020-2021 Baseline

With funding support from the Global Affairs Canada (GAC), CARE implements a 24 months multi-sectoral livesaving project: WASH, Protection and SRMH support to IDPs and Returnees in Iraq 2020-2021 in Duhok governorate (Chamishko and Essyan IDP camps) and Ninewa governorate (Sinjar district) with 64,434 individuals (18,169 women, 14,701 girls, 16,924 men, 14,640 boys) direct beneficiaries aiming at WASH, Protection Intervention, and SMRH. The methodology for baseline survey is based on using mixed-method participatory approach as baseline team believes that participation improves quality and enhances ownership.
The CARE baseline survey data collection for the camps took place from May 21, 2020 to May 31, 2020, and in Sinjar district from September 1, 2020 to September 10, 2020. The purpose of the baseline study is to better understand the situation and current needs of the population in order to ensure more effective and responsive project implementation as well as improved living conditions for IDPs, returnees and host communities in the project areas [45 pages]. Read More...

EDUCATION AND PROTECTION FOR SYRIANS IN JORDAN PROJECT ADA Final Evaluation

The “Education and Protection for Syrians in Jordan'' project has been implemented through CARE International in Jordan and funded by ADA. This project is designed to address the needs of vulnerable Syrians and Jordanian citizens, and targeted four urban areas of Jordan, including Amman, Irbid, Mafraq, and Zarqa. The first objective provided conditional cash for the protection and education of vulnerable youth who are at risk of dropping out or have already dropped out of school due to either working or due to the risk of early/child marriage and, therefore, not attending school. The second objective focused on providing vulnerable families with case-management support, following which referrals were made in order to connect these beneficiaries with both internal and/or external services. In addition, interventions included peer-to-peer support group activities, as well as one-day Psychosocial sessions (PS) implemented at CARE community centers that were focused on recreational, educational, and empowerment activities. The third objective provided small business development training and grants to entrepreneurs hoping to establish or expand their businesses. [19 pages]. Read More...

Kinder und Jugendliche Willkommen KIWI Project III Wirkungsbericht 2020

The KIWI project has been in existence since the beginning of 2016. The pilot phase in North Rhine-Westphalia (January to September 2016) was financed entirely by donations from the alliance Aktion Deutschland Hilft. Funding from the Deutsche Bank Foundation, the RTL Foundation "We Help Children" and the UN Refugee Aid enabled us to expand the program nationwide. Subsequently, we were able to consolidate and further expand KIWI nationwide through funding from the EU's AMIF programme and again from the Deutsche Bank Foundation. The promotion of school projects for the design of diversity and encounters and the awarding of the KIWI prize are part of an accompanying project financed by the Deutsche Bank Foundation. This first impact report according to the Social Reporting Standard includes the results of the third project phase as well as the accompanying project. We also report on the development process of KIWI as a "learning" project. Further funding from the RTL foundation "We help children" gave us the opportunity to transfer the KIWI approach to primary education as part of the KIWI kids pilot project (September 2018 – February 2020). This publication also provides a brief overview of the main results of this pilot phase.

Das KIWI-Projekt existiert seit Anfang 2016. Die Pilotphase in Nordrhein-Westfalen (Januar bis September 2016) wurde vollständig aus Spenden des Bündnisses Aktion Deutschland Hilft finanziert. Eine Förderung durch die Deutsche Bank Stiftung, der Stiftung RTL „Wir helfen Kindern“ sowie der UNO-Flüchtlingshilfe ermöglichte uns die bundesweite Ausdehnung des Programms. Im Anschluss konnten wir durch eine Förderung aus dem AMIF-Programm der EU und wiederum der Deutsche Bank Stiftung KIWI bundesweit konsolidieren und weiter ausbauen. Die Förderung von Schulprojekten zur Gestaltung von Vielfalt und Begegnung und die Verleihung des KIWI-Preises sind Bestandteil eines durch die Deutsche Bank Stiftung finanzierten Begleitprojektes. Dieser erste Wirkungsbericht nach Social Reporting Standard umfasst Ergebnisse der dritten Projektphase sowie des Begleitprojektes. Außerdem berichten wir über den Entstehungs- und Entwicklungsprozess von KIWI als „lernendes“ Projekt. Eine weitere Förderung durch die Stiftung RTL „Wir helfen Kindern“ gab uns die Chance, den KIWI-Ansatz im Rahmen des Pilotprojekts KIWI kids (September 2018 – Februar 2020) auf den Primarschulbereich zu übertragen. Diese Publikation enthält auch einen Kurzüberblick über die wesentlichen Ergebnisse dieser Pilotphase. [64 pages]

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Turkey Case Studies On Syrian Refugees

A collection of case studies about shelter, livelihoods, and protection with Syrian refugees as they tell their stories of getting through their crisis. Read More...

Final Evaluation Food for Peace II program in Syria

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the project “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” in Aleppo and Idleb, funded by USAID Food for Peace and implemented by four partner organizations over a period of 15 months. Project activities included multi-round and emergency cash assistance, in-kind assistance (RTE rations and ready to-eat rations) and wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers participating in another of CARE’s livelihood project, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread production, and infrastructure improvements). The evaluation was conducted in the period between August to mid-September 2020 to address the key evaluation questions posed by CARE, organized under the OECD DAC evaluation criteria: 1) Relevance, 2) Efficiency, 3) Effectiveness, 4) Impact, 5) Sustainability.
The purpose of the evaluation was to document evidence of change at outcome and impact levels to be used for organizational learning and improvements of future programming, and accountability towards donor, partners and ultimately beneficiaries. Read More...

Women’s Economic Empowerment in Protracted Crisis: Syrian Refugee Women in Southeastern Turkey

As Syrian refugee crisis entered its ninth year, the protracted nature of the crisis has become more prominent, with the need of better integration of humanitarian response and development goals. Livelihoods activities with their long-term focus play an important role in humanitarian development nexus. This research is conducted to review and discuss best practices and potential risks for women’s economic empowerment (WEE) projects in protracted crisis in general, and in southeastern Turkey context in particular. The following report should be of interest to any humanitarian organization that conducts livelihoods projects for Syrian refugees in SET region, and that shares the commitment to achieve a more gender-equal society.
In general, women face additional social obstacles to reach economic resources, which span from unpaid care work to gender norms regarding women’s being provider. Majority of Syrian women in Turkey are not actively seeking employment because of their childcare responsibilities, not getting permission to work from either their husband or extended family, care of disable and elderly in the household, and housework. Designing a livelihoods program without considering these additional obstacles women face means that the program is not equally approachable for all genders. Hence, women are the ones left behind as they are the less employable. This research clearly shows that the only way to have a sustainable impact on WEE is to ensure not only women’s economic advancement but also women’s empowerment and gender equality. Read More...

Jarablus Needs Overview

Since January 2020, Syria's economic future is increasingly becoming uncertain. Regional actors and local commmunities, who were previously acting as an economic bridge to the outside world, are facing their own economic turmoil and leaving Syria isolated with unprecedent depreciation of the Syrian Pound. The interlinked nature of Syria’s politics, economy and infrastructure are now forcing citizens to choose between the uncertainty of a pandemic or reality of household deprivation at the confluence of the conflict, economic crisis and COVID-19 pandemic.

This infographic aims to present an overview of the needs in Jarablus through an internal analysis of data collected by
Humanitarian Needs Assessment Programme during the months of July and August 2020. Read More...

AN INTERSECTIONAL ANALYSIS OF GENDER AMONGST ROHINGYA REFUGEES AND HOST COMMUNITIES IN COX’S BAZAR

The Rohingya ethnic minority population in Myanmar have been persecuted over generations and are denied of their fundamental human rights. Violence, discrimination and persecution in Myanmar have eventually led the stateless Rohingya people to flee
to Bangladesh from Rakhine State in successive waves over the last four decades. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, reaching the total number of 914,998 people and constituting the largest refugee camp
in the world. The rapid and sizable influx of Rohingya refugees now outnumbers locals nearly three to one in the two sub-districts, Ukhiya and Teknaf, where refugees and the subsequent humanitarian response have had an impact on the host community.
This inter-agency research is commissioned by ActionAid in collaboration with UNHCR and CARE Bangladesh to investigate how age, gender and diversity issues are addressed in the humanitarian response amongst Rohingya refugees and the host communities. The
quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 03 December 2019 to 07 January 2020. This transdisciplinary research aims to fill a significant gap by providing a critical analysis of the present status of gender relations addressed in humanitarian response, taking into consideration the intersectionality among specific needs based on age, gender and other diversity factors contributing to a person or group’s vulnerability.
This study was conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the change in context, it has now become even more imperative to adapt existing mechanisms within the ongoing response, especially the need for increased Age, Gender and Diversity (AGD) analysis and monitoring of vulnerabilities. While COVID-19 was not a factor in this report, the recommendations of this report need to be addressed and implemented with the changing context in mind. Read More...

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