Sudan

Gender-Sensitive Conflict Analysis in South and East Darfur States, Sudan, 2022

CARE International in Sudan is implementing the project “Enhancing resilience through improved food security, disaster risk reduction and peaceful co-existence in South and East Darfur states, Sudan” (1 September 2021 – 31 August 2025) through funding from the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). The project addresses the specific needs, vulnerabilities, and capacities of women, youth, and persons with disabilities to strengthen their resilience to buffer, adapt, and respond to future shocks at an individual, family, and community levels. This gender sensitive conflict analysis in East and South Darfur – representing eight villages – is to understand the causes, power and gender dynamics, and actors of conflicts in the project area.

The conflict in Darfur is escalating rapidly, with eight times more people killed and displaced in 2021 than in 2020. Inflation rose by 359% in 2021. Climate change—marked by devastating floods and prolonged droughts—combined with food insecurity and a lack of services leaves people feeling violence is their only choice.
A profoundly unequal and harmful set of social norms that do not value women, and even refer to them as vessels of the devil, coupled with laws that do not protect women and their rights, are pushing many burdens of this crisis onto women. A common saying is, “Almara mamlouka ela malak Almout” or “A woman is owned to death.” As the situation gets more extreme and livelihoods and service get scarcer, women are more likely to be working outside the home to help meet family needs. Men have not increased their involvement in household chores and childcare to compensate for these shifts—leaving women with even higher burdens than before. The shifts in women having to work outside the home have not translated into corresponding improvements in women’s rights, engagement in politics, or access to public life.
This research draws from 20 focus groups and 20 Key Informant Interviews that represent the views of 193 people (45% of whom were women) in eight villages in July of 2022. It also looks at 44 secondary sources.
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The Impact of COVID-19 on Gender Equality and Food Security in the Arab region with a focus on the Sudan and Iraq

This rapid gender analysis (RGA) explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on gender equality and food security in the Arab region. It is a joint collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Food Programme (WFP) and CARE International (CARE). This collaboration recognizes the need to expand the evidence base on gender-differentiated impacts of crises for informed recovery and response planning, while highlighting the imperative of collecting sex- and age-disaggregated data (SADD) more consistently.
This initiative was an innovative pilot project between FAO, WFP and CARE. The aim of the collaboration was to foster multilevel partnerships and strengthen gender analysis for the food security sector in crisis contexts. The initiative brought together technical experts in food security, nutrition and livelihoods across the agencies involved, as well as gender specialists to explore, develop and test tools, methods and approaches. The regional focus of the study identified key themes, challenges and norms across multiple contexts in the Arab region, while highlighting specific findings for Iraq and the Sudan. While sources have varying regional definitions for the Arab region, for the purpose of this review, the denomination includes the countries under the FAO Near East and North Africa region, the WFP Middle East and North Africa region, and the CARi Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The findings and successes of this initiative are intended to strengthen the relationship between gender and food security actors
regionally, and in particular within Iraq and the Sudan, while increasing the availability and transparency of gender analysis in the sphere of food security. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Um Rakuba Camp and Tunaydbah Settlement, Eastern Sudan April 2021

Since 9 November 2020, Ethiopian and Eritrean asylum seekers have been arriving in Eastern Sudan, fleeing a military escalation in the Tigray region in northern Ethiopia. Eastern Sudan is facing multiple challenges including high levels of food insecurity, flood recovery, increased militarisation on the Sudan and Ethiopia border, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic and the impacts of mitigation and containment measures. As of 17th April (latest situation report), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Government’s Commissioner for Refugees (COR) registered 62,850 individuals who have crossed the border into Eastern Sudan. It is estimated that 36% of the arrivals are female and 64% are male. Further estimations show that 27% of the arrivals are children (0-17years); out of which 8% are below 5 years. Elderly (+60years) comprise 4% and Adults (18-59 years) 69% of the arrivals. Of those who arrived, data as of January 2021, showed 15,056 are women and girls of reproductive age and 1,365 currently pregnant women. Primary data collection, through FGDs, KIIs and Individual Stories, took place between 16-18th February 2021, in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement.

RGA objectives were to:
• Better understand, the main needs, priorities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys,
as well as at-risk groups in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement
• Identify how CARE and the wider humanitarian community can adapt and design targeted services
and assistance to meet these needs, ensuring we do no harm. Read More...

Final Evaluation Report: Gender-sensitive WASH, Nutrition and Health Support to vulnerable communities in South and East Darfur

CARE has been implementing the WASH ,Health and Nutrition project from which aims to provide lifesaving and integrated WASH, Health and Nutrition Services to 174,504 individuals (87,077 males and 87,427 females) in East Darfur and South Darfur through the GAC-funded 2019-2021 project (“the GAC project”).The program aimed to benefit refugees in camp and out of camp settings, out of camp IDPs and host communities by increasing access to safe water supply, sanitation facilities and hygiene supplies, improving access to basic curative and preventive primary health care, and increased access to nutrition assistance for children under five and pregnant and lactating women (PLWs). End line evaluation was conducted for the ended project.

Water: from the survey result it shows that 85.8% responded that their primary source of water is safe throughout the year, compared to the baseline survey which shows that 66% of the respondents still use unsafe drinking water sources.

Sanitary practices: 73.9% of survey participants indicated that they use family toilets for defecation, where in the base line survey show that 34% of the respondents having access to adequate sanitation.

Practice Of Hand Washing: 60.9 % of interviewees (Female: 61.0%, Male: 60.8%) know three critical moments, where in base line survey 65% of the respondents being able to mention at least 3 critical times to perform hand washing.

WASH satisfaction: The end line survey for HHs reported that with WASH regarding relevance, timely and accountability, (75.3%)- (70.6% f,77.9%m) reported that it was relevant

Nutrition: 72.9%% of respondents were satisfied with the nutrition assistance provided.
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Baseline Report in Conducted in East and South Darfur Focused on Health, Nutrition, and WASH

The humanitarian situation in Sudan has continued to deteriorate since 2018, where the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance steadily rose from an estimated 700,000 to a total of 5.5M individuals. Across Sudan, 3.8 million people are urgently in need of WASH assistance, 5.2 million people are in urgent need of access to basic primary health care services, and a total of 2.8 million
children and Pregnant and Lactating Women (PLW) suffering from acute malnutrition. Darfur remains an epicenter of large-scale protracted displacement.
There have been limited baseline assessments conducted in CARE’s project areas due to the recent political uncertainties, insecurity, staff capacity and funding constraints. This baseline assessment was conducted internally by staff of CARE International Switzerland in Sudan with support from an RRT member deployed for a few days in country. The RRT worked with M&E team in Khartoum to plan
and train volunteers and CARE staff on baseline survey. The volunteers under the supervision of CARE staff undertook data collection and cleaning; and the RRT member performed the analysis and the report writing.
The assessment interviewed 277 sampling units and each unit represented a household using a household questionnaires tool. Of the respondents interviewed 71% were women and 29% men. The age groups interviewed included adolescent (1%), adults aged 18-49 years (83%) and the elderly aged 50+ years (16%). Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

Baseline Survey in East and South Darfur Focused on Health, Nutrition and WASH

The humanitarian situation in Sudan has continued to deteriorate since 2018, where the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance steadily rose from an estimated 700,000 to a total of 5.5M individuals. Across Sudan, 3.8 million people are urgently in need of WASH assistance, 5.2 million people are in urgent need of access to basic primary health care services, and a total of 2.8 million children and Pregnant and Lactating Women (PLW) suffering from acute malnutrition. Darfur remains an epicenter of large-scale protracted displacement.

There have been limited baseline assessments conducted in CARE’s project areas due to the recent political uncertainties, insecurity, staff capacity and funding constraints. The assessment interviewed 277 households.
* 53% of people (46%m, 56%f) have good knowledge on positive nutrition practices.
* The survey found out that of the women interviewed, 62% were aware and had good knowledge of exclusive breastfeeding
* disease incidence averaged at 44% across the study area.
* 66% of the respondents still use unsafe drinking water sources;
* 34% of the respondents having access to adequate sanitation but still about 28% of respondents confirmed that at least one member of their HH practiced open defecation.
* 65% of the respondents being able to mention at least 3 critical times to perform hand washing.
* 21% of the respondents said women were actively involved as members of WASH committees within their communities.
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Sawtaha (Her Voice) صوتها

This current study was proposed to garner further analysis on the current situation across the five States in Darfur, to better understand the level of women’s meaningful participation and leadership in peace building mechanisms. The research questions focused on the four key areas of CARE International Sudan’s framework for gender equality: advance her human capital; avail the space; engage men and boys; and create an enabling environment.

The recommendation of the study focuses on (1) addressing the negative impact of male authority on women participation in CBRMs, (2) generating new knowledge and values that favour women’s participation in the public domain, (3) educating and building women’s leadership capacities, (4) addressing issues of SGBV through prevention, protection and service provision programs Read More...

Social Norms and Barriers Analysis for Agro-pastoralist Women and Girls in South Darfur, Sudan

This report takes a special focus on examining the changing reality of life for agro pastoralist women and girls in South Darfur, Sudan through the lens of social norms and barriers, adding to a set of regional studies (Ritchie 2015 - 2017). Increasingly fragile, agro-pastoralist groups in East Africa now often combine pastoralism with both farming and trading. Women in such societies have been identified as both marginalized and vulnerable.

In the Darfur region of Sudan, rural women remain particularly challenged, with insecurity conflict and displacement. Yet with appropriate development interventions, access to services and government policies, women and girls stand at the forefront of social change, as they adopt new livelihood opportunities and embrace new rights and entitlements.

This research aimed to capture both qualitative as well as quantitative dynamics of current change in agro-pastoralist girls’ and women’s social norms, customs and practices in South Darfur. Read More...

Midterm Review of Every Voice Counts Programme

The major objective of the Mid-Term Review of the Every Voice Counts Program in Sudan was to assess the extent to which increasing participation of women and youth in community structures such as Village Development Committees and community and locality level decision making processes and access to finance had been attained. This is in addition to the aim of enhancing their representation and giving them better access to decision making bodies. Read More...

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