Women's Economic Empowerment

Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Program (GEWEP-III) Baseline Study

The Gender Equality and Women Empowerment III (GEWEP-III) project focuses on strengthening women’s right organizations and women-led CSOs. In particular, the Kabul Women’s Association (KWA) members are included in the impact group of the project. In order to best foster an enabling environment for women’s greater participation and voice, the project also targets influential groups and male members of communities, who can play an essential role in the promotion of gender equality and women’s rights. The baseline assessment focused on four main objectives, to: (1) provide detailed contextual information/ situational analysis on gender norms, power dynamic, gender-based violence, violence against women, gender equity and behavior of individual women, their male member of communities and stakeholders (religious/community leaders) in each of the target areas relating to the three outcome areas to help refine and evidence the project theory of change, log frame indicators, targets, and assumptions, (2) gather relevant data to establish baseline for project indicators to enable changes in women’s lives to be measured over the course of the project and during the final evaluation, (3) develop recommendations for the project monitoring, learning and final evaluation assessment of the project, and (4) explore the current knowledge and attitudes towards gender related issues, women empowerment and male engagement strategies. The baseline study adopted cross-sectional design using both quantitative and qualitative data. The project literature was coupled with surveying and interviewing 478 project beneficiaries and stakeholders. Read More...

Women, Migration and Development: Investing in the future

On the 17th and 18th of July 2014, the International Conference on Women, Migration and Development: Investing In The Future was convened by CARE
International and hosted at the Overseas Development Institute in London. The objectives of the conference were to: 1) highlight the challenges faced by vulnerable migrant workers, especially women, 2) advocate, based on CARE and others’ experiences, for strategies, policy and practical responses which need to be taken to protect migrant workers’ well-being, particularly with respect to safe mobility and access to healthcare, 3) recognize women migrants’ contribution as economic actors and advocate for policies and planning processes that ensure their protection, 4) advocate for recognition of the role of migration as a key development enabler in the post-2015 development agenda. CARE and ODI presented the findings from their five year EMPHASIS (Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV and AIDS Services, Information and Support) programme in South Asia. EMPHASIS, a project which started as a HIV and health intervention, was successful in surfacing and addressing other aspects such as safety and dignity of migrants, economic empowerment, financial inclusion and safe remittances, access to education for migrants’ children, and women’s empowerment. The conference was a response to the call at the May 2014 Stockholm Global Forum for Migration and Development both for civil society/government cooperation around regional systemic approaches to migration and for urgently needed programmatic data and evidence on migration. EMPHASIS is considered among very few projects globally which comprehensively cover the migration experience from source, through transit, to destination countries. The EMPHASIS Learning Series report, which provides a comprehensive overview of
the EMPHASIS programme, was launched during the conference. [5 Pages] Read More...

Final Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation of Women Smallholders and Cotton Producers from Vidarbha Region, Maharashtra

CARE India’s project on “Environmentally Sound and Climate Resilient Cotton Production Practices (ESCRCPP)”, supported by Group Galeries Lafayette, was implemented from 2018 to 2021 in 10 villages of Jalgaon Jamod block of Buldhana district in Vidarbha region of Maharashtra, aimed to promote environmentally sound, climate-resilient and inclusive cotton production. The location of the project was guided by the fact that Vidarbha accounts for half of the cotton area of Maharashtra, which has one third of cotton growing area in India and Buldhana district is the major cotton producing area in Vidarbha. The cotton based agricultural economy of the region faces challenges like water stress, climate variability and issues related to farming practices and technology. These result in low productivity, frequent crop failure, poor management of water resources, and high indebtedness of farmers.
The project had three purposes (sub-objectives or outcomes) and six expected results (outputs). The outcomes were: women small holders have the capacity to engage in environmentally sound and climate-resilient cotton production; strengthened collectives for building solidarity, promoting gender equity, and facilitating access of women smallholders from poor and vulnerable households to resilience building resources, services, and opportunities; and enabling environment in the form of supportive cotton value chain actors.
This report is 82 pages long. Read More...

Evidence Review of Women’s Groups and COVID-19: Impacts, Challenges, and Policy Implications for Savings Groups in Africa

It has been more than a year since COVID-19 lockdowns began, and economic recovery is a top priority for governments, donors, and international financial institutions (IFIs) worldwide, including in sub-Saharan Africa. Targeted investments that increase community resilience and spur economic growth will mitigate some of the negative economic consequences of this crisis. Investment in women’s economic resilience and social support is para- mount, considering that the crisis may reverse recent progress in gender equality. Around the world, women’s groups, such as self- help groups, savings groups, and health groups, play an important role in communities; evidence shows promise in their role in promoting women’s empowerment and economic outcomes. They encompass many models, but all bring women together around a shared purpose, such as financial inclusion, livelihoods, health, and women’s rights.
This brief focuses on one specific type of women’s group in sub-Saharan Africa: savings groups. Savings groups are a common form of women’s group and serve as a reliable mechanism for people in sub-Saharan Africa to save money. Members of savings groups pool small weekly savings into a common fund, which members can then borrow against, creating opportunities for investments and women’s empowerment. Savings groups show mixed, but promising, results in improving economic and social outcomes. This brief, written by a consortium of researchers and practitioners, presents emerging evidence from studies in diverse African contexts— with a deep dive into Nigeria and Uganda—on how COVID-19 has affected savings groups and how these groups have helped mitigate the pandemic’s negative consequences in sub-Saharan Africa.
This report is 23 pages long. Read More...

Baseline of “Mujeres en Empresa” project

This Baseline Report of the Women in Business-Strengthening the Approach Project provides information on the initial values ​​of the project indicators within the entire results chain, at the level of result, effect, process and product. This project corresponds to a third implementation phase that runs from April 2020 to March 2022, after two previous stages and successive development. The purpose of this project is "To scale the business entrepreneurship models of women developed by the project, through investment and commitment from the public and private sectors", through an intervention in 34 districts located in three regions ( Piura, Junín and Huancavelica).
The baseline of the project was carried out between the months of August and November 2020 and provided relevant starting information for the project. A major scale challenge represents women entrepreneurs who in a proportion less than 20% apply business management practices in the 34 districts targeted by the project. This population has a high level of informality, low educational level, medium-high poverty level of deprivation and is located for the most part in urban areas.
This report is 124 pages long. Read More...

Evaluation finale du Programme d’Amenagement du Delta Interieur du Niger (PADIN-II)

The Inner Niger Delta Development Program (PADIN-II) in the Mopti Region has been implemented in 24 Communes classified as vulnerable in four Circles of the Mopti Region in Mali. The program, lasting more than five years (Sept. 2013-June 2019), was implemented by a number of stakeholders: technical services and governorate, municipal authorities, NGOs and farmers' organizations. The NGO CARE-Mali was the main operator of the program, which was funded by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Bamako to the amount of 7.87 billion FCFA. The goal was to improve the living conditions of 20,000 households (or 120,000 people) of agro-pastoralists and fishermen in the Inner Niger Delta (DIN) and Sourou. The report is 104 pages long. Read More...

Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Program II 2016-2019

The Women-Girls Empowerment and Civil Society Governance Project (PEF-GS) called MAAYA DANBE in the local language, is funded by the Norwegian government through CARE Norway for a period of four (04) years (2016-2019) and aims to empower women and girls facing poverty, inequality, violence and social exclusion to claim and realize their human rights. The report is 82 pages long. Read More...

Beyond Economic Empowerment The Influence of Savings Groups on Women’s Public Participation in Fragile and (post) Conflict-Affected Settings Every Voice Counts

Women’s meaningful participation and influence in public processes in fragile and (post) conflict-affected settings (FCAS) is not only necessary to achieve inclusive development but is a fundamental human right. Unfortunately, in most contexts, men are overrepresented in decision-making and women do not have equal voice in the decisions that affect their lives. Some evidence suggests that the economic empowerment of women opens up opportunities for them to participate in public decision-making processes. One such means for economic empowerment in FCAS is savings groups. Savings groups are small, community-based groups that can provide members a safe space to save money, take small loans, and make investment decisions. Globally, women have made advances in improving their income and access to savings, as well as increased their entrepreneurial endeavours as a result of their participation in savings groups. Research also shows that women’s participation in savings groups improves their confidence, skills, and ability to influence household decision-making. This prompts the question: do these benefits of women’s participation in savings groups extend into the public sphere? In other words, does women’s participation in savings groups influence their public participation1 and decision-making? Through a mixed methods investigation across five countries (18 villages) in Africa and South Asia (Burundi, Mali, Niger, Pakistan, and Sudan), using CARE’s Gender Empowerment Framework, this research investigated the differences in outcomes between women who participate in savings groups under three CARE programmes: Every Voice Counts (EVC), Women on the Move (WoM), and Latter Day Saints Charities (LDS) Recovery Support for Vulnerable Households programmes [74 pages]. Read More...

RAPPORT DEFINITIF BASELINE PROSPER II Thriving Cocoa Community Cargill

Cette étude dont l’objectif était de déterminer la situation actuelle des ménages producteurs de cacao dans les treize (13) nouvelles communautés sélectionnées du Projet PROSPER II sur les quatre (04) axes d’intervention du projet : (i) la gouvernance communautaire ; (ii) l’inclusion financière et des compétences entrepreneuriales des femmes ; (iii) la diversification des sources de revenus des ménages agricoles incluant la nutriton ; (iv) les solutions alternatives communautaires au travail des enfants ; afin que puissent être mesurés les changements qui interviendront après les trois (03) prochaines années de mise en œuvre, en utilisant la même approche, a démontré que la situation actuelle desdits ménages n’est guère réluisante. C’est ce que l’analyse des résultats combinés aux sources sécondaires et primaires notamment la collecte de terrain et les discussions de groupe nous permet d’indiquer. [97 pages]. Read More...

A Social Impact Analysis of CARE’s ‘Enhancing Women’s Voice to STOP Sexual Harassment ’ Project

The Enhancing Women’s Voice to Stop Sexual Harassment project (STOP), an initiative of CARE Australia, has been working since 2017 to prevent and address the under-reported problem of sexual harassment in mainland Southeast Asia’s garment sector. At the time of writing, STOP is the only initiative that addresses this issue on a multi-country scale within the sub-region. Operating across a pool of garment factories in four Mekong countries—Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam—STOP aims to enhance women’s voice and economic rights at both the national and factory levels. Based on a socio-ecological model of violence prevention, CARE Country Offices (COs) are working with participating factories to create workplaces where female workers feel safe and experience less SH through the implementation of standardised SH reporting mechanisms and rigorous training programs. Supported by CARE Regional staff, each CARE CO engages with relevant country, regional and international stakeholders to strengthen the national regulatory environment to promote laws, policies and mechanisms to address SH in the workplace.

In 2018, CARE Australia commissioned a consortium of researchers from UNSW Sydney and UNSW Canberra to undertake an independent evaluation the STOP project and provide a separate Social Impact Assessment (SIA) focused on Cambodia STOP as the particular case study. The SIA is intended to complement the findings of the Final Evaluation (FE) of the STOP, as implemented in the other three project sites. The SIA and the Final Evaluation should be read as two parts of a single whole. The UNSW team drew upon a range of evaluative sources including factory surveys, focus group discussions and key informant interviews with factory workers, middle management and government officials. A conceptual framework is also advanced in order to better capture the nuances of social impact and gender transformation, and to provide a rigorous basis on which to evaluate STOP’s development and implementation in Cambodia. [94 pages]. Read More...

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