Food Security

SELAM 1 Early Recovery and Socio-Economic Stability in Tigray: FPI MONITORING REPORT

In June 2023, Altai Consulting, the Third-Party Monitor (TPM) for the EU FPI, was tasked by the Nairobi Regional Team (RT) to research and
communicate the progress and impact on the ground of the project NDICI CRISIS FPI/2021/427-921 – “SELAM 1 Early Recovery and Socio-Economic Stability in Tigray”, implemented by CARE and REST.

The project is implemented in Tigray as part of a cluster of projects alongside CST and MdM projects also montiroed by Altai during this visit. These interventions focus on responding to Tigray’s post-war challenges, mostly related to livelihoods support, access to health services, and trauma healing.

The monitoring team looked to capture progress towards the project’s intended objectives at the mid-stage of its implementation. During an earlier monitoring conducted in December 2022, the Altai team found that progress had stalled due to security challenges on the ground but that the projects were gaining momentum due to the peace agreement signed in November 2022. Read More...

Takunda Resilience Food Security Activity (RFSA) Outcome Mapping Baseline report

The main objective of Progress Marker Monitoring/Outcome Mapping is to assess, the extent to which gender transformative changes are taking place in Takunda Program areas among men, women, and youth based on age, life stage, socio-cultural norms, and religious practices. Takunda acknowledges that gender inequality is both a cause and consequence of food insecurity; hence gender equality is at the heart of the Takunda Program. To challenge gender norms that fuel food insecurity, the Program implements Social Analysis and Action (SAA), a key gender transformative approach that triggers shifts in gender norms at the individual, household, community, and policy level. This progress marker assessment specifically measured behaviors and practices at play for the different study participants before Takunda’s Social Analysis and Action (SAA) interventions and it confirmed some of the findings of the Takunda gender Analysis study held in December 2021. The progress marker assessment measured gender outcomes/behaviors as defined by the communities, whereas the gender analysis assessed program-wide challenges experienced by different groups as defined by the program. Read More...

Titukulane Gender Progress Marker Monitoring Report

Titukulane is a five-year, US $75 million Resilience Food Security Activity funded by the Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance. The project is led by the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) in partnership with Emmanuel International (EI), the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), the National Smallholders Farmers’ Association of Malawi (NASFAM), Save the Children (SC), and WaterAid. Implemented in 19 Traditional Authorities (T/As) of two southern districts of Malawi (Zomba and Mangochi), Titukulane directly impacts 510,910 individuals – including adolescent girls and boys aged 10 to 19, and young women and men aged 20 to 29 – who face an uncertain future as farming becomes less viable. Titukulane offers an integrated and gender-responsive package of interventions across the following program elements: maternal and child health; nutrition and water, sanitation, and hygiene, (WASH); agriculture sector capacity; microenterprise productivity; civic participation; and capacity building, preparedness, and planning. The program works across three purpose areas:

Purpose 1: Increased, diversified, sustainable incomes for ultra-poor, chronically vulnerable households (HHs), women and youth.
Purpose 2: Nutritional status among children < 5, adolescent girls, and women of reproductive age improved; and
Purpose 3: Increased institutional and local capacities to reduce risk and increase resilience among very poor and chronically vulnerable households in alignment with the National Resilience Strategy.

Gender integration is a crosscutting component among all activities and project emphasizes the critical importance and benefits of increased voice, participation and leadership of women and youths, including young women. A Gender Analysis was initially conducted for Titukulane in 2020 to identify context specific gender barriers, inequalities, and potential risks that could negatively affect the achievement of the project’s expected outcomes, as well as to assess how these constraints could be addressed in Zomba and Mangochi. Read More...

Ghana: Inequalities in Food Insecurity

Food insecurity is a global health challenge, especially among low- and middle-income countries. The Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2.1 targets to: “End hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and vulnerable people, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round by 2030.” In Ghana, the situation worsened in 2022. The number of individuals in food crisis surged from 560,000 in 2021 to 823,000 in 2022, marking a 47% increase in individuals suffering from lack of food access, availability, and utilization. As per the Food and Agricultural Organization, in terms of the prevalence of moderate or severe food insecurity in Ghana, 12.9 million people, or 39.4% of the total population, were affected in 2022. Read More...

Uganda: Food insecurity a pressing concern

The Development Initiative for Northern Uganda (DINU) was a 38-month long project (January 2020 to February 2023) with an aim to improve food security, maternal and child nutrition, and household incomes for smallholder farmers in 11 districts of Uganda. The project has three major outcomes: increased production of diversified food by both men and women smallholder farmers, enhanced market accessibility for these farmers, and improved nutrition and family planning services through gender responsive community-based approaches. As a result, here was a significant 16.3% increase in adoption and production of diverse food crops and animal products, as well as 23.8% increase in the adoption of climate-smart technologies among the project participants. Read More...

RECOVERY, REINTEGRATION & RESILIENCE (R3) CONSORTIUM AFGHANISTAN

The R3 consortium in Afghanistan was born in October 2020 and designed to run until March 2024. Its objective was to address the needs of the population in a context of significant displacement and chronic fragility, bridging the gap between short-term humanitarian response in the early months of displacement, and longer-term sustainability and development. The three dimensions of resilience are thus deliberately included in the title of the Consortium itself: Recovery (absorptive); Resilience (adaptive) and Reintegration (transformative). R3 programming was implemented by a consortium of NGOs led by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) with the participation of Action Against Hunger (AAH), CARE, and World Vision International (WV). Across eight provinces in western and southern Afghanistan, programming spanned a range of sectors in line with the consortium’s planned holistic approach: Water, Sanitation & health (WASH), Healthcare, Food Security & Livelihoods (FSL); Shelter, Legal Assistance, Psychosocial Support, Gender-Based Violence (GBV). Read More...

TATWEER “Livelihood Security and Civil Society Strengthening in the OPT.”

TATWEER was implemented from May 2009 - April of 2015 utilizing partnerships with three Palestine NGOs (Applied Research Institute-Jerusalem (ARIJ), Economic and Social Development Center of Palestine (ESDC), and New Farm Company (NFC). The project was implemented to help devastated farmers begin to regain food security in the Jenin and Tubas regions. This research seeks to understand and assess the sustained post-project outcomes and impacts both achieved and unintended of the TATWEER as a food security enabler among Palestinian households. CARE Palestine, CARE USA, and partners used mixed methods for this post-project sustainability study. Read More...

Yen Sore Final Evaluation

The Yensore programme is a continuation of CARE Denmark and CARE Ghana’s support to Ghanaian civil society. The first phase of Yensore was implemented from 2013 to 2017. The second phase, which was implemented 2018 – 2021, continued to support four partners, KASA, Wacam, Civic Response, and UCSOND. The programme focused on organisational development and natural resource advocacy in the areas of mining, oil & gas, forestry and climate change. For the second phase the overall objective was to ensure that “the rights of vulnerable communities to natural resources essential for their food security and resilient livelihoods are respected, protected and fulfilled through inclusive and responsible governance of natural resources”. Read More...

LIVELIHOODS FOR RESILIENCE ACTIVITY

In October2019, CARE Ethiopia commissioned Care Plc. to conduct repeated annual intermediate result (IR) assessment of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity over the coming three years, corresponding to the fiscal year of the project from 2019-2022. The study involves assessing project’s intermediate result that have been achieved based on the key performance indicators using information collected randomly selected project participating households as well as conducting multiyear trend analysis of changes in the well-being of project participants based on panel data are collected from 400 households . Read More...

Feed the Future Ethiopia Livelihoods for Resilience (L4R) Learning Activity

This report presents the baseline resilience analysis of the USAID Feed the Future (FTF) Livelihoods for Resilience (L4R) activity in Ethiopia. The overarching goal of L4R is to increase economic growth and resilience in Ethiopia by enhancing livelihood opportunities for chronically food-insecure households in targeted woredas. The objective of this report is to provide insight into the extent to which L4R activities improve key household resilience outcomes and strengthen the resilience capacities of food-insecure and vulnerable households in the project areas. The impact evaluation (IE) baseline study provides estimates against which to monitor and assess the progress and effectiveness of L4R activities during implementation and after the activity is completed. Given that the ending of the IE will occur one year after the L4R activities have ended, the final results will also be able to measure the sustainability of the project’s impact.

The L4R impact evaluation seeks to answer eight research questions. This baseline study gathers data that answers some of the research questions now; other questions will be addressed in subsequent recurrent monitoring surveys and the endline report. Read More...

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