Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

DEC Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I & Phase II Final Evaluation Report

Yayasan CARE Peduli (YCP) has been implementing a 25-month program of DEC-funded Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I and Phase II, running from 1 October 2018 through 31 October 2020. The project aims to help secure livelihoods recovery for the most vulnerable households in Central Sulawesi who were affected by the major earthquake and tsunami in 2018.
In DEC Phase 1, the emergency response was delivered in the sector of WASH and Shelter to support the disaster-affected people. In DEC Phase 2, the recovery period focused in WASH and livelihood programs, particularly for female-headed households. In both phases, YCP was working in collaboration with PKPU/ HI, as local implementing partner. Overall, the DEC provided supports with the amount of about USD 1 million for 25-months project period and reached to more than 28,000 people.
This evaluation is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the project’s achievements, lessons learned, and recommendations for future actions for similar project within YCP. The evaluation focused on research questions that assess criteria in Core Humanitarian Standards: Appropriateness & relevance; Effectiveness; Timeliness; Strengthening of local actors; Communication, participation and feedback; Coordination with and complementarity to other actors; Continuous learning and improvements; Support for staff; and Management of resources, as well as assessing cross cutting Issues, consists of: Gender sensitivity; Social inclusion and; Accountability.
This report is 54 pages long. Read More...

Multiagency and Multisectoral Rapid Need Assessment in Raya Kobo, Raya Alamata, Raya Azebo, Chercher, Wajirat and Ofla Woredas of North Wollo and South Tigray Zones


2020 was ascribed as a record year of disasters by the local communities in the locations covered by this assessment; Raya Kobo, Raya Alamata, Raya Azebo, Raya Chercher, Wajirat and Ofla woredas in North Wollo and South Tigray. The multiple, complex and frequent hazards have proved relentless; COVID 19, Desert Locusts and conflict have exhausted the coping capacity and challenged the resilience of the local communities.
The Tigray conflict erupted at the backdrop of the devastating impact of COVID- 19 and locust infestation crisis. To make the matter worse, the conflict erupted in the middle of the harvest season, effectively halting attempts to gather the remains of already depleted crops. The longer- term effects of, which will impact communities for years to come.
Since there was already an influx of IDPs from the 2017 ethnic conflicts around the country, the region experienced in hosting IDP, but on this occasion, the numbers of incoming families have doubled and, in some cases, trebled, according to reports from the local Woreda authorities responsible for registering such movement. Thus, these two zones are under protracted and complex crisis that have rocked the livelihood base of the communities and put their lives into a very precarious situation.

Objectives of the Assessment
a) Assessing the current humanitarian situation and identify response requirements and preferences1 for IDPs as well as host community members with humanitarian support needs
b) Understand the response capacity and preparedness of partners operating in Amhara and Tigray and to act in a complementary manner to rescue the lives and livelihoods of the
communities and IDPs,
c) To be ready for humanitarian support in line with humanitarian principles and NGOs code of conduct, and
d) Understand current humanitarian concerns of the targeted areas in both regional states
(Amhara and Tigray) and act to raise these concerns with potential benevolent donors within the country and overseas, to generate funds

This report is 43 pages long. Read More...

Multiagency and Multisectoral Rapid Need Assessment in North Gondar and West Tigray Zones Among Conflict Affected IDPs and Host Communities

In its report released a couple of weeks ago, UN urged donor partners and friends of Ethiopia for urgent mobilization of additional resources to address potential new needs as a result of the fighting for the law enforcement, as well as existing needs previously identified in the Humanitarian Response Plan. There are more than 2 million people in need of some type of assistance in Tigray region and thousands of people fleeing from Tigray region to Amhara and Afar regions, having lost everything in the conflict.
As a result of this situation, six international humanitarian agencies including World Vision Ethiopia, CARE, Catholic Relief Service, ActionAid Ethiopia, Oxfam Ethiopia and ORDA agreed to collaborate and carry out joint rapid assessment in most affected woredas of Tigray region and influx affected neighboring woredas of Amhara region. The assessment was organized and carried out in two teams. Team one following the North Wollo and South West Tigray Route (Raya Kobo, Alamata, Raya Azebo and Ofla) and team two following the North Gondar and West Tigray Route (Addi Arikay, Beyada, Janamora and Tselimti). Accordingly, the mission teams have started the assessment on 23rd Dec. 2020 through 3rd Jan 2021. This report is an analysis of the assessment process and findings of team two. This report is 26 pages long. Read More...

Real-Time Evaluation Asia-Pacific Regional COVID-19 Task Force

The Asia-Pacific Regional COVID-19 task force (RTF) was set-up in April 2020 as part of CARE’s global corporate emergency protocols. The intention of the RTF was to coordinate support across the CARE membership to contribute to effective pandemic response actions at the country level, as well as appropriate support and guidance for staff at all levels.
The official remit of the RTF that was agreed upon by the membership was to support: 1) COVID-19 humanitarian response; 2) clear, consolidated and contextualized programming guidance for COs, CMPs, affiliates and candidates; 3) communications for brand coherence & higher influence; d) information management; 4) COVID-19 specific regional advocacy; 5) consolidating program and response learning; 6) making resources on COVID programming available for external partners; 7) coordinating technical support; 8) linking to the global task team.
Now, six months into the response, the RTF has established a real-time evaluation to draw out learnings and understand how effective a role it has played in reaching its stated objectives. This RTE is intended to be a light, “good enough” review of the AP COVID-19 Task Force’s (henceforth referred to as RTF) performance since its inception.
The expectation is that learning from this evaluation will inform decision-making around possible continuation of the RTF, and also shed light on any adaptations to the remit, configuration or ways of working of the grouping that are required. Read More...

SOMALI RELIEF AND RECOVERY PROGRAM (SSRP) Final Evaluation

The Somalia Relief and Recovery Project-SRRP main goal was to address the most urgent and basic needs of drought affected communities in Bari, Galgaduud, Lower Juba, Mudug, Sanaag, Hiraan, and Sool regions that have been severely affected by the recurrent drought crisis. In particular, the project aimed to improve access to safe water and hygiene to drought-affected communities, provide temporary employment opportunities, and delivered treatment services for acutely malnourished children and pregnant and lactating women, provide basic health services, and protection services. The project also aimed at improving coordination through Somalia NGO consortium to concert and coordinate efforts to adequately address the recurrent humanitarian challenges in Somalia. [66 pages]. Read More...

Beyond Economic Empowerment The Influence of Savings Groups on Women’s Public Participation in Fragile and (post) Conflict-Affected Settings Every Voice Counts

Women’s meaningful participation and influence in public processes in fragile and (post) conflict-affected settings (FCAS) is not only necessary to achieve inclusive development but is a fundamental human right. Unfortunately, in most contexts, men are overrepresented in decision-making and women do not have equal voice in the decisions that affect their lives. Some evidence suggests that the economic empowerment of women opens up opportunities for them to participate in public decision-making processes. One such means for economic empowerment in FCAS is savings groups. Savings groups are small, community-based groups that can provide members a safe space to save money, take small loans, and make investment decisions. Globally, women have made advances in improving their income and access to savings, as well as increased their entrepreneurial endeavours as a result of their participation in savings groups. Research also shows that women’s participation in savings groups improves their confidence, skills, and ability to influence household decision-making. This prompts the question: do these benefits of women’s participation in savings groups extend into the public sphere? In other words, does women’s participation in savings groups influence their public participation1 and decision-making? Through a mixed methods investigation across five countries (18 villages) in Africa and South Asia (Burundi, Mali, Niger, Pakistan, and Sudan), using CARE’s Gender Empowerment Framework, this research investigated the differences in outcomes between women who participate in savings groups under three CARE programmes: Every Voice Counts (EVC), Women on the Move (WoM), and Latter Day Saints Charities (LDS) Recovery Support for Vulnerable Households programmes [74 pages]. Read More...

CYCLONE IDAI RESPONSE AND RECOVERY PROJECT IN MANICALAND PROVINCE: CHIPINGE AND CHIMANIMANI DISTRICTS Baseline

CARE International in Zimbabwe and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) Consortium are currently visible in Chipinge and Chimanimani districts through -support from ECHO. The consortium is currently implementing early recovery interventions which seek to address the immediate WASH and basic needs of the Cyclone Idai affected populations. The interventions are centred on a community-based integrated approach focused on building local capacities and empowering communities to regain control over their lives and become more resilient using a robust cash-based component. Targeting a total of 9 wards in Chimanimani and Chipinge districts, CARE and IRC consortium are maximizing the geographic reach and multi-sectoral coverage of the Action using a harmonized, closely coordinated, gender-sensitive consortium approach. The project is targeting households which were affected by the Cyclone Idai disaster, those whose shelter was completely or partially destroyed. Other vulnerability attributes such as elderly people, People with Disabilities, pregnant and lactating women, child headed households, and Internally Displaced People among other attributes were used for appropriate targeting.
The consortium is currently providing community-driven livelihoods support in four targeted wards through a Cash for Work program that was designed to rebuild community productive assets. The project is also implementing integrated WASH support interventions in 2 wards in Chipinge district and 1 ward in Chimanimani district whilst implementing the Multi-Purpose Cash Transfer project in 4 wards in Chimanimani district. The consortium conducted a baseline survey in both districts for all the interventions underway to facilitate evidence based monitoring and evaluation as well as to match targets with the expected project outcomes. The results will be used for both guiding project implementation and determining project impact by providing the datum for measurement [23 pages].
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When Time Won’t Wait (Spanish, French, and Arabic)

Humanitarian crises can offer a ‘window of opportunity’ to transform unequal gender relations and shift harmful gender norms. Integration of gender into humanitarian programming ensures that the specific vulnerabilities, needs, capacities and priorities of women, girls, men and boys — related to pre-existing gender roles and inequalities, along with the impacts of the crisis — are recognised and addressed.
Sound gender analysis and programming from the outset is critical to effective crisis response in the short-term, and equitable and empowering societal change in the long-term. CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) approach and tool, developed during the humanitarian response in Syria in 2013, aims to drive a shift to locally driven and women-centered needs assessment which influences how needs are defined and responses are developed. The approach aims to provide essential information about gender roles and responsibilities, capacities, and vulnerabilities together with programming recommendations in situations where time is of the essence
and resources can be scarce. The ultimate goal of such an approach is to influence humanitarian response, program design and implementation to ensure that it supports not only the immediate needs of women and girls but also upholds their rights. CARE’s RGA has now been used in over 50 crises around the word and is featured as good practice in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s (IASC) Gender Handbook for Humanitarian Action. With rapidly increasing interest in and adoption of CARE’s RGA approach, discussion and questions continue as to whether increased awareness of gender, power and disaggregated data sets are translating into safer, more responsive, and effective aid.
To answer these questions, CARE commissioned an external evaluation to ‘provide an analysis of the effectiveness and influence of the RGA approach on adapting programming to improve gendered outcomes for crises-affected communities.’ The scope of the evaluation was global and focused on rapid gender analyses and related humanitarian programming over the period 2015-2020. These are executive summaries in Spanish, Arabic, and French. You can find the full report in English here: http://careevaluations.org/evaluation/when-time-wont-wait-cares-rapid-gender-analysis-approach-external-evaluation/ Read More...

ESTUDIO DE SATISFACCIÓN DE BENEFICIARIAS DEL PROYECTO ELECTRONIC FOOD VOUCHERS “CANASTAS VIRTUALES” Electronic food vouchers for coping with new challenges

El 15 de marzo de 2020, luego de declarar la OMS como pandemia por Coronavirus (COVID19), el Estado Peruano declaró Estado de Emergencia Nacional e inicio de una cuarentena. Las medidas gubernamentales implementadas, si bien contuvo inicialmente la propagación de la infección, generó impacto negativo en la calidad de vida de las familias en situación de pobreza y pobreza extrema (20,5% según INP 2018) y los programas de apoyo y subsidio generados por el gobierno, no eran suficientes. El periodo de cuarentena agudizó la situación de precariedad de una economía peruana altamente informal, un sistema sanitario débil y evidenció las limitaciones de acceso que tenían las familias a medios de comunicación virtual.
Bajo este contexto CARE Perú, entiende que estos impactos repercuten en mayor medida a las mujeres y niñas, y entre otros a los pequeños emprendedores, como los dueños de bodegas. Existen en el país alrededor de 500,000 bodegas1 y más del 60% son emprendidas por mujeres, estas bodegas han presentado una caída de más de un 50% en sus ventas. En este sentido, CARE Perú diseñó una intervención innovadora de doble impacto, que consideró abordar a las familias en situación de vulnerabilidad y contribuir en la reactivación de las bodegas de las localidades donde ellas radican, aplicando mecanismos que involucran el uso de la tecnología.

El Proyecto se denominó “Electronic food vouchers for coping with new challenges”, financiado por Fundación Coca Cola, conocido como “Canastas virtuales Coca Cola”, el cual fue implementado entre mayo y octubre de 2020 y tuvo como objetivo beneficiar a 800 familias de Lima, Junín, Arequipa y Piura, mediante la entrega de un kitCARE (canasta familiar de productos alimenticios nutritivos) por tres oportunidades (más de 3500 canastas), adquiridos en una bodega a través de una plataforma virtual, que operaba como una pasarela de pago, para más del 70% de las beneficiarias, el otro grupo de 30% utilizó otro medio. Estudio de satisfaccion [44 pages]. Read More...

The Impact of COVID-19 on Women in Democratic Republic of Congo

Evidence worldwide indicates that women are disproportionately affected by the health and socio-economic impacts of intervention
measures applied for the control of COVID-19. Women make up the majority of the informal labour sector and are more likely to suffer job losses or reduced income as a result of closed borders, markets and shops, and restricted movement. Sexual and reproductive health services are often the first to face restrictions in terms of availability and access. School closures place an additional burden on women, who take on childcare responsibilities, including ensuring adequate nutrition. Girls who cannot go to school are at increased risk of sexual violence, pregnancy, and early marriage - a trend that was widely observed in areas affected by Ebola during the 2014-2016 epidemic in West Africa. Risks are exacerbated for women and girls living in the poorest households in remote rural areas.
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in March 2020, mixed methods data produced by the Social Sciences Analytics Cell (CASS) and its partners presents a dynamic where pre-existing disparities between men and women in terms of health, social protection and economic status are being exacerbated by the outbreak and its response. This report presents an integrated multidisciplinary analysis of the impact of COVID-19 and its response on women and girls in the DRC, highlighting changes that have occurred since the beginning of the outbreak. The objective of this report is to provide evidence to support decision-making for strategies to respond to the outbreak to ensure that the health, protection and economic security of women and girls is prioritised. Read More...

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