Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

Gender-Sensitive Conflict Analysis in South and East Darfur States, Sudan, 2022

CARE International in Sudan is implementing the project “Enhancing resilience through improved food security, disaster risk reduction and peaceful co-existence in South and East Darfur states, Sudan” (1 September 2021 – 31 August 2025) through funding from the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). The project addresses the specific needs, vulnerabilities, and capacities of women, youth, and persons with disabilities to strengthen their resilience to buffer, adapt, and respond to future shocks at an individual, family, and community levels. This gender sensitive conflict analysis in East and South Darfur – representing eight villages – is to understand the causes, power and gender dynamics, and actors of conflicts in the project area.

The conflict in Darfur is escalating rapidly, with eight times more people killed and displaced in 2021 than in 2020. Inflation rose by 359% in 2021. Climate change—marked by devastating floods and prolonged droughts—combined with food insecurity and a lack of services leaves people feeling violence is their only choice.
A profoundly unequal and harmful set of social norms that do not value women, and even refer to them as vessels of the devil, coupled with laws that do not protect women and their rights, are pushing many burdens of this crisis onto women. A common saying is, “Almara mamlouka ela malak Almout” or “A woman is owned to death.” As the situation gets more extreme and livelihoods and service get scarcer, women are more likely to be working outside the home to help meet family needs. Men have not increased their involvement in household chores and childcare to compensate for these shifts—leaving women with even higher burdens than before. The shifts in women having to work outside the home have not translated into corresponding improvements in women’s rights, engagement in politics, or access to public life.
This research draws from 20 focus groups and 20 Key Informant Interviews that represent the views of 193 people (45% of whom were women) in eight villages in July of 2022. It also looks at 44 secondary sources.
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Hunga-Tonga Hunga-Ha’apai Response Program Baseline May-June 2022

The purpose of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai Volcano and Tsunami Response program is to support the immediate and early recovery needs of people directly affected by the eruption of the Hunga Tonga–Hunga Haʻapai volcano. Read More...

Evaluating System-level change and impact Findings from the evaluation of the Humanitarian Assistance Program (PAH) in Ecuador

CARE’s ten-year strategy, Vision 2030, seeks to deepen the organizational focus on systems-level change and impact, recognizing that this is essential to expanding CARE’s reach and fulfilling our mission to save lives, defeat poverty and achieve social justice. To support this, CARE launched a systems-level impact initiative to measure the effect of our programs that have influenced or changed systems, and the impact of this systems-change on people’s lives. The initiative also increased capacity across the CARE confederation to design, finance and implement high-quality systems change programs, and to strengthen the focus on systems-level change within our Country Office organizational frameworks and strategies. Four CARE Country Offices were selected to evaluate a project or program, and to synthesize the results for national and global learning. Read More...

CARE Guatemala Food Security Rapid Assessment 2022

EVALUACIÓN RÁPIDA DE INSEGURIDAD ALIMENTARIA SAN BARTOLOMÉ JOCOTENANGO, QUICHÉ

Rural families in Guatemala face one of the most severe food shortage seasons, mainly due to the high cost of meeting their basic needs, the effects of international conflicts and COVID-19 prevention measures, low hiring of temporary labor, the slow recovery of the impact of storms Eta and Iota, and the rainy season 2022 that has started with rains above normal, causing water saturation in the soil, which affects subsistence agriculture. This is worst for families who live in the dry corridor.

In this context, the Municipal Coordinator for the Disaster Reduction –COMRED- and the Municipal Directorate of Comprehensive Disaster Risk Management -IMGIRD of the municipality of San Bartolomé Jocotenango, department of Quiché, with the technical support of CARE Guatemala and TECHO, surveyed 163 households in 33 rural communities to know the availability and access to food, the economic situation, gender roles and strategies of survival that families are implementing. This report shares the results of the analysis of the data collected in July 2022

• 42% of households do not have any remaining grain from the previous harvest, and a further 33% only have remaining grain reserves for further 3 months or less.
• Women earn 56% less than men. On average, men earn $143 per month, and women earn $62.
• 21% have gone into debt to be able to buy food
• 38% are reducing the size of their meals; 22% of people are eating less (or have stopped eating) to make sure their children can eat
• 31% are now skipping at least one meal per day
• 3.7% have spent entire days without eating
• 2% have sold their land to buy food
• In 45% if the households, at least one member has migrated outside the community to find jobs elsewhere.
• Women and young girls are doing 94% of the work preparing food, cleaning, and taking care of family members. Read More...

The crisis we can still avert

By September of 2022, the global food crisis had gotten so extreme that 205.1 million people urgently need humanitarian food assistance just to survive. Tragically, if we do nothing, the crisis could grow by another 620.9 million people in the next 6 months. That is the crisis we can still avert. Investing in food production, increasing resilience, and functioning markets can stave off this crisis if we act fast.

A recent report from Gro Intelligence and CRU Group estimates that the impacts from the Ukraine crisis on nitrogen fertilizer availability in the global agriculture system will lead to a total loss of 72 trillion calories of food produced in 2022 alone. That loss would cause 620.9 million MORE people who are already struggling to meet their basic food needs to lose at least one more meal a day for the next 6 months. This is the crisis that is coming—growing the current crisis by more than three times higher the 205.1 million people already experiencing food crisis.

Gender inequality will play a significant role in this crisis. Based on current trends in gender equality and food security, 332.8 million of these people will be women. That means 44.7 million more women than men could miss one meal a day for the next 6 months. Women could miss 8.5 billion more meals than men.

This is not a foregone conclusion. We can still act to prevent the worst of the crisis. The number of calories lost is only part of the story. Food insecurity is as much as story of inequality as it is of food production. Read More...

Making the Invisible Visible – An evidence-based analysis of gender in the regional response to the war in Ukraine

The escalation of the war in Ukraine began on 24 February 2022, causing thousands of civilian casualties; destroying civilian infrastructure, including hospitals, and triggering the fastest growing displacement crisis in Europe since World War II. The demographic profile of Ukraine, combined with the implementation of martial law and conscription policies, led to an awareness of gender- and age-related factors within the regional humanitarian response that recognised the pre-crisis situation of persons of all genders and diversities and how the war and subsequent regional crise s were compounding the risks that they face.

From the early days of the response, Rapid Gender Analyses (RGA) and other analyses and assessments were conducted, and the Regional Gender Task Force (RGTF) recognised the emergence of common themes and concerns within these that required a closer examination. It was identified that the solutions to the concerns identified required national, regional and cross-border solutions rooted in broad changes in policy and the humanitarian architecture. However, at the time, gender themes, including trends, gaps and specific challenges faced by women and men belonging to different socio-economic and ethnic groups, across the
humanitarian and refugee response in the region had not been captured adequately. Read More...

Sistematización del modelo de respuesta sanitaria desde la comunidad – FORS

CARE Perú en asociación con la compañía minera Antamina implementó el Proyecto de Fortalecimiento de la Respuesta Sanitaria Local a través de la Movilización y Reactivación Social (FORS), con el objetivo de fortalecer las capacidades de respuesta organizada de los sistemas de salud locales y las comunidades/territorios del Área de Influencia Operativa (AIO) de Antamina, frente a la emergencia de la CODIV-19, priorizando a la familia como unidad de vigilancia, información y cambio de hábitos, a través de dos componentes: 1) Movilización local de respuesta a la COVID-19 y Reactivación Social; y 2) Fortalecimiento de los Establecimientos de Salud locales para la atención de la pandemia según nivel de atención. Read More...

CAP Final Proyecto FORS

Este estudio se ha desarrollado en el marco del proyecto Proyecto Fortalecimiento de la Respuesta Sanitaria Local a través de la Movilización y Reactivación Social (FORS). El objetivo del estudio fue implementar el estudio de línea de salida (final) de los Conocimientos, Actitudes y Prácticas (CAP) de las familias del Área de Influencia Operativa de Antamina, del personal de establecimientos de salud del AIO, y valorar la contribución del proyecto FORS en el impacto de la reducción del COVID-19. Read More...

Expanding Learning on the Effectiveness of Integrating Gender-based Violence Prevention, Mitigation, and Response and Cash and Voucher Assistance

This program aimed to include adult women and men, aged 18 years or older, who were survivors of or at risk of GBV, including those with diverse SOGIESC and those living with a disability or disabilities. CORPRODINCO caseworkers were all female and enrolled survivors who voluntarily disclosed an incident of GBV. Caseworkers assessed participants’ need for cash assistance for protection, examining the economic drivers of their exposure to GBV risks, as well as the financial barriers to their recovery; this process took place according to the program’s standard operating procedures, which were aligned with best practice guidance and tools. Survivors who met the program’s eligibility criteria and were enrolled were guided through the steps of the cash referral during GBV case management by their caseworker. Read More...

Uganda: Refugees and Host Communities in Yumbe and Terego Districts Rapid Gender Analysis

The conflict in South Sudan expanded to the southern parts of the country in July 2016, which led to an influx of refugees in Northern Uganda. Uganda hosts 1.5 mill. refugees in total, many live in refugee settlements. The four largest settlements in West Nile are Bidi Bidi, Palorinya, Rhino and Imvepi, with numbers of refugees ranging from 60,000 to more than 240,000. According to a report of the World bank and Uganda Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) on gender-based violence (GBV) in Uganda from 2020, more than 80 % of the refugees and asylum seekers in Uganda are women and children. During the conflict, violence against women and girls such as the abduction of girls and the use of rape as a weapon of war was used. Women and girls fleeing to Uganda reported sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) “to have taken place throughout the route of migration within South Sudan itself as well as when crossing the border." Read More...

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