Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

WOMEN LEAD IN EMERGENCIES IN UGANDA

Women have a human right to participate in public life and decision-making, including in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from natural disasters, conflict, and other crises. Yet, women directly affected by crises are still excluded from most humanitarian responses and from public decision-making more broadly. Women’s participation in community responses and recovery saves lives and increases gender equality. Conversely, when women’s voices are not heard, women’s rights and needs are often not adequately met, and emergency response can reinforce inequalities that perpetuate vulnerability, insecurity, and poverty. Women Lead in Emergencies is a CARE global program that supports local women’s groups to take a lead in responding to the crises that affect them and their communities. It is the first practical toolkit for frontline CARE staff and partners with guidance on how to promote the participation and leadership of women in communities at the forefront of crisis within humanitarian programming. Read More...

Análisis de Contexto Sobre Necesidades Humanitarias Bajo Escenario de Inseguridad Alimentaria Honduras, América Central.

Honduras es un país vulnerable a distintas amenazas naturales. Las tormentas se han hecho cada vez más frecuentes solo en la temporada de huracanes del Atlántico de 2020 fue la más activa de la historia y la quinta consecutiva en superar el promedio de actividad. Se registraron 30 tormentas tropicales con nombre, de las cuales 13 se convirtieron en huracanes, de estos 2 afectaron directamente Honduras (Eta e Iota en aproximadamente 10 días ambos meteoros azotaron el país, generando impactos adversos y evidenciando las condiciones de vulnerabilidad. En los últimos años se ha registrado un aumento significativo de afectación por fenómenos naturales, sociales, políticos, económicos que han puesto en evidencia las necesidades humanitarias de la población. Al respecto la Oficina de Coordinación Asuntos humanitarios (OCHA) de Naciones Unidas en abril 2020 estimaba que poco más de 2.7 millones de personas afectadas y de éstas al menos 1.3 millones de personas con necesidades humanitarias inmediatas, las principales afectaciones estaban asociadas con una pobreza endémica, unos desastres y choques climáticos recurrentes, y una violencia crónica endémica de difícil control.

La Unidad Técnica de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutricional (UTSAN) estimó que de diciembre 2020 a marzo de 2021, por lo menos 2.9 millones de personas (31% de la población analizada) se encuentran en crisis alimentaria o peor, Fase 3 o superiora según la Clasificación Integrada en Fases de la Seguridad Alimentaria (CIF) y por tanto requieren acciones urgentes, esto asociado tanto efectos actuales por las tormentas y la pandemia como a la sequía prolongada en corredor seco y problemas estructurales como la pobreza y la desigualdad, entre otros. Ante ese escenario tan complejo de necesidades humanitarias se desarrolla un esfuerzo conjunto entre CARE, ASONOG, ADEPES, CASM, OCDIH para realizar en el periodo de mayo-junio del año en curso un proceso de análisis que contribuya a tener una actualización sobre las necesidades humanitarias en relación a inseguridad alimentaria en poblaciones en municipios y departamentos de influencia, así como la identificación de soluciones desde la perspectiva local frente a la problemática multidimensional que está propiciando un deterioro en la calidad de vida las poblaciones más vulnerables y de privación de derechos básicos. Read More...

CONEX Balkan Project Rapid Gender Analysis Report Western Balkan Region – Albania, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, and Serbia

CONEX is a regional project implemented in six Balkan countries designed to support the marginalized groups of people in the targeted communities that have suffered the most during the Covid-19 crisis, namely the elderly, unemployed women, minorities, refugees, internally displaced persons (IDPs) and persons with disabilities to transition from relief to recovery and onwards to development.
The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) has been conducted to provide essential information about gender issues and concerns that should be addressed and will not only be used to define concrete action points and possible adaptations of project design but also as a learning tool and advocacy platform with national NGO networks and local/national authorities. The RGA objectives are to:
 Assess the ways and the extent to which women and other vulnerable groups are affected by social and economic deprivation due to consequences of the COVID-19 crisis;
 Explore how the prevailing gender norms and roles relate to the project activities and objectives, in particular with regard to the access to information, ability to access services, employment and effects of gender based violence (GBV) and
 Increase the gender analysis and integration related capacities of project staff (gender-sensitization, RGA data collection training).
The RGA was conducted in the period May-October 2021 and consisted of three main segments facilitated by the CARE team: 1. Capacity building of partners on gender and how to conduct the RGA; 2. Coordination of data collection, analysis, and validation 3. RGA report writing.
In total, 28 implementing partners’ staff members from nine organizations in 21 locations in six target countries organized and facilitated 53 events (focus group discussions - FGDs and key informant interviews -KIIs) during which they directly talked to 195 persons (66% female), 21% ethnic minority (Roma and Ashkali), over 29% persons from rural areas and 11% persons with disabilities – PWD. Read More...

CARE Malawi COVID Vaccine Delivery Situation January 2022

“The vaccines are here but support for delivery is most needed, especially at the last mile.” – District Health Management Team member, Ntcheu
As of January 10, 2022, Malawi had delivered 1.84 million doses of vaccine out of the 3.12 million doses it has received so far.1 Many doses in country have rapidly approaching expiration dates, and if they do not get to people fast, they risk expiring on the shelves. To make sure the 1.26 million doses left go to the people who need them most, we must invest more in communication, engagement, and delivery. The $37M granted by the World Bank over the past year is sufficient for covering only 8% of Malawi’s total population. What is more, as the highly contagious Omicron variant spreads worldwide, it is even more critical that more people are vaccinated now. We cannot assume that the Government of Malawi and its current health system can do it alone.

The government and other health actors in Malawi are working tirelessly to vaccinate people, while facing multiple health crises. The health system is building on a base of committed (if overstretched) health workers, an openness to community feedback, and a long expertise of delivering The government is coordinating closely with many actors to reduce gender gaps, get vaccines to the last mile, and keep existing health services open. Nonetheless, the Ministry of Health is under-resourced, and operating in a global system where the vaccine supply that arrives may be close to expiring. For example, doses of the Astra-Zeneca vaccine had to be destroyed in the spring, after arriving in Malawi with only two and a half weeks left before their expiration date.

More investment is needed. To take just one example, the national government has been able to provide one van per district to support mobile vaccination sites, to get vaccines to the last mile. Mobile vaccinations are the most effective way to serve people who live far away from health centers and do not have access to easy forms of transportation. That means that in Ntcheu, one van is expected to serve a target population of 214,929 people living over 3,424 square kilometers. One van cannot serve those people fast enough to make sure vaccines get where they need to in time, especially when an inconsistent and unpredictable vaccine supply could have doses expiring at any time. Read More...

Nepal COVID-19 Vaccine Costing Study

By December 6, 2021, 19.2 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered in Nepal, enough for 36% of the population to have gotten at least one dose of vaccine. After a rough road with unpredictable vaccine supply, the government has been able to procure several million vaccine doses. Now delivery at the last mile is the biggest hurdle they face. Nepal’s Minister of Health says, “We are not going have shortages of vaccines anymore, but our main concern and focus now is on getting these vaccines to all corners of the country, including the remote mountain areas.”

Based on national data, and in-depth studies in 2 health districts, CARE estimates that delivery costs from “tarmac to arm” for vaccines in Nepal are $8.35 (1,019 NPR) per dose of vaccine administered, or $18.38 (2,241 NPR) per person fully vaccinated.

This is nearly 5 times more expensive than current global estimate for delivery costs. These costs range from $11 per fully vaccinated person in easier to reach areas, to $33 per dose in remote, difficult to reach areas. Gaps in vaccine coverage are particularly acute for mountainous areas, people with low mobility, and communities far from health centers. Even the lowest-cost estimates for the easiest to reach areas are nearly 3 times higher than global average estimates.

70% of these costs are personnel needs to ensure vaccines reach people at the last mile. This points to a major need to improve investments in vaccine delivery, especially the health care workers who administer vaccines and ensure everyone gets vaccinated.
Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Latin America & the Caribbean – Ciudad Juárez, Mexico

Asylum seekers and migrants traveling through Central America and Mexico to the U.S. border face a range of risks, but women, girls, and other vulnerable groups—such as members of the LGBTQIA community—are confronted with additional threats to their health, safety, and well-being in their countries of origin, countries of transit, and in the U.S. As a result, asylum seekers and migrants who arrive at the U.S.–Mexico border often carry a heavy burden of trauma from experiences with violence. The lack of a system to appropriately support people on the move deepens pre-existing inequalities and exposes already vulnerable groups to additional, unnecessary, risks.
The U.S. Government’s Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as the “Remain in Mexico” policy, returns asylum seekers and migrants from U.S. custody to Mexican territory, compelling them to face months of risk and uncertainty as they wait to complete their asylum processes. The asylum process itself is challenging and unclear, liable to change without warning, and largely opaque to affected populations. The asylum seekers and migrants waiting in Mexico’s Ciudad Juárez city, along the Mexico–U.S. border, face ever-present threats of extortion, gender-based violence (GBV), and kidnappings, which compound their trauma and restrict their freedom of movement and access to critical resources and services. Trauma and fear were the norm of the population that CARE surveyed, not the
exception.
The female asylum-seekers and migrants in Ciudad Juárez that CARE spoke with reported feeling profoundly vulnerable and isolated. They consistently relayed a lack of trust in authorities and an increasing level of anti-migrant sentiment in the city. The lack of either confidential GBV screenings or formal complaint mechanisms left survivors with almost no one to turn to for support and services. Asylum seeking and migrant women, girls, and LGBTQIA individuals who feared for their safety reported remaining inside shelters as much as possible, leaving only when absolutely necessary. In Ciudad Juárez, some asylum seekers and migrants have found refuge in overwhelmed and
underfunded informal shelters. These shelters are largely run by local faith-based organizations, and could meet only a fraction of the need. Despite these efforts, the humanitarian response to the migration crisis is characterized by a haphazard and uncoordinated approach that is devoid of reference to the humanitarian standards that would be the norm in other emergencies. The shelters did not have appropriate intake procedures, such as vulnerability screenings. Few had sufficient water and sanitation facilities for the number of residents, and many shelters housed residents together in common spaces regardless of age or gender, amplifying the risk of harm to vulnerable persons. Asylum seekers and migrants in the shelters frequently lacked information about available health and legal services. Read More...

Fast and Fair Vaccine Update August to October 2021

CARE's Fast and Fair initiative supports countries to equitably deliver COVID-19 vaccines through four pillars: Advocate, Facilitate, Protect and Mobilize.
CARE has identified 22* countries (and counting ) with strong capacity, partnerships, and readiness to scale.
By October 2021, CARE has supported vaccines in districts where 126 million people have delivered vaccines. We have also supported mass media messages promoting vaccines to 263 million people. Read More...

A STUDY ON THE IMPACT OF COV1D-19 ON WOMEN AND GIRLS IN ETHIOPIA

By August 9, 2021, Ethiopia had reported more than 284,000 COVID-19 cases and 4,426 deaths. Since COVID-19 was first reported in Ethiopia in March of 2021, the impacts of the pandemic, the measures taken to curb COVID-19, and additional political, economic, and environmental crises have severely impacted the population.
Women and girls bear different burdens in this crisis, and emergency responses often overlook the differences
in impacts and needs for women, girls, men, and boys in humanitarian responses. To that end, this research—
with funding from the EUTF (European Union Emergency Trust Fund) provides insight into the impact of COV1D-19 on women and girls in Ethiopia. This insight informs recommendations and guide EUTF partners and other relevant stakeholders in the areas of EUTF interventions. With this objective in mind, four woredas (administrative districts), one refugee camp, and one Industrial Park (IP) were considered as sample areas. These are Sekota Zuria and Gazgibla woredas in Wag Hemra zone of Amhara region; Moyale and Miyo woredas in Borena Zone of Oromia region, Asayita Refugee Camp in Afar region, and Bole-Lemi Industrial Park in Addis Ababa.
This research surveyed 372 women and girls in April 2021. The quantitative surveys covered adult women and girls over the age of 15. It also provides insights into the differences between refugees, Internally Displaced People (IDPs), refugees, and migrants. Qualitative from focus group discussions and key informant interviews also reflects opinions from men and boys. Read More...

Supporting flood Forecast-based Action and Learning (SUFAL) Project in the 2020 Monsoon Floods

Background: ‘Supporting flood Forecast-based Action and Learning’ (SUFAL) project was designed to contribute to reducing the adverse impacts of the increasing frequency of catastrophic flooding on the vulnerable and poor communities through Forecast-based Action (FbA). The project was funded by The Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) and was implemented through a consortium led by CARE Bangladesh, with Concern Worldwide, Islamic Relief and Regional Integrated Multi-Hazard Early Warning System for Africa and Asia (RIMES). The project was implemented in three northern districts of Bangladesh: Jamalpur, Gaibandha, and Kurigram. FbA contributed to disseminating Flood Early Warning messages with a lead time of 10 – 15 days with timely and accurate weather forecast information, while and it also helping to identify potential flooding areas.

Methodology: The primary purpose of the study was to “Evaluate the impact of early actions” applied through the SUFAL project on household and community beneficiaries in responding to the 2020 monsoon floods. Customized OECD-DAC criteria, Quasi-experimental design (Difference-in-Difference Method), Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) framework and Value for Money (VfM) framework were used as guiding methods and tools to design study instruments and evaluate the impact of early actions at every stakeholder level. The study covered a control group in non-project areas and three treatment groups in the project areas: Treatment group 1 (EWM support), Treatment group 2 (EWM + Evacuation + Shelter + WASH support), Treatment group 3 (EWM + Evacuation + Shelter + WASH + Cash-grant support). Treatment groups were categorized in three different groups to conduct cost-effectiveness analysis. The study areas were in the districts of Kurigram (Hatia, Begumganj, Buraburi, Shaheber Alga unions), Gaibandha (Bharatkhali, Saghata, Ghuridaha, Haldia unions) and Jamalpur (Kulkandi, Chinaduli, Noarpara, Shapdhor. The survey sample consisted of 224 control respondents (of which 153 were women) and 754 treatment respondents (of which 426 were women), among which Sample for treatment group 1, 2, and 3 were 293 (100 women), 292 (192 women) and 169 (134 women), respectively. A total of 118 of the 754 treatment households interviewed through the survey were women-headed households and 38 out of 224 control group households were women headed households. The team had conducted 7 FGDs with community members in the three implementation areas, and 27 KIIs with community volunteers, project staff, government officials, and other related NGOs.

Impact: It was found through the study that less people in treatment group experienced damages compared to control households, treatment households saved more resources in 2020 than control households, and the average monetary values of assets saved by treatment group in 2020 were higher compared to the control group households. Due to the drawn-out duration and intensity of the flood in 2020, respondents reported that they were not able to prevent more damages although they took more early actions. Besides, treatment areas were the most flood affected areas. The early messages had helped the community to prevent damage to their assets and livelihoods. The percentage of damage prevented in agricultural sector for the treatment group had increased to 28% since the flood of 2019. The damage prevented in fisheries had increased significantly by 18 percent in 2020 in compared to that of 2019. The death of family members from waterborne diseases had decreased (except female members) in comparison to the previous flood in 2019. It is quite evident that the early warning message had enabled the males to take early actions regarding relocation of the vulnerable
family members to higher grounds, relative’s houses, or to the shelters. The cash for work modality had also helped the community people to obtain a source of income by working for the embankment, roads, bamboo bridges, etc. Shelter renovations and upgradations reportedly encouraged the community people to evacuate faster. The average amount of loan taken by a treatment respondent and control respondent was found to have been Taka 20,194 and Taka 18,335 respectively. However, post flood loan burden was significantly less for the cash grant recipients (only 32% took loan after flood) as compared to other treatment groups (more than 50% took loan). The
cash grants are said to have helped the recipients address their basic needs during the flood and also helped them to some extent to repair their house and pay for livestock treatment after the flood. [70 pages] Read More...

Gender Gaps in Vaccines November 2021

COVID-19 vaccinations are quickly becoming a story of inequality. Gender inequality is a critical part of this story. In 22 of 24 countries where CARE has data, women are less likely to be vaccinated and less likely to feel vaccines are safe.

There are massive local and global gaps in who can get vaccinated. Only 4.5% of people in low-income countries are vaccinated, and 79% of vaccinations have been in wealth countries. Tragically, wealth and geography are just two factors that skew access to vaccines. Another is gender. In many low and middle-income countries, women are less likely to get COVID-19 vaccines than men are. This compounds gender inequality women are already facing in health and decision-making Read More...

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