COVID 19 RGA

The Impact of COVID-19 on Women in Democratic Republic of Congo

Evidence worldwide indicates that women are disproportionately affected by the health and socio-economic impacts of intervention
measures applied for the control of COVID-19. Women make up the majority of the informal labour sector and are more likely to suffer job losses or reduced income as a result of closed borders, markets and shops, and restricted movement. Sexual and reproductive health services are often the first to face restrictions in terms of availability and access. School closures place an additional burden on women, who take on childcare responsibilities, including ensuring adequate nutrition. Girls who cannot go to school are at increased risk of sexual violence, pregnancy, and early marriage - a trend that was widely observed in areas affected by Ebola during the 2014-2016 epidemic in West Africa. Risks are exacerbated for women and girls living in the poorest households in remote rural areas.
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in March 2020, mixed methods data produced by the Social Sciences Analytics Cell (CASS) and its partners presents a dynamic where pre-existing disparities between men and women in terms of health, social protection and economic status are being exacerbated by the outbreak and its response. This report presents an integrated multidisciplinary analysis of the impact of COVID-19 and its response on women and girls in the DRC, highlighting changes that have occurred since the beginning of the outbreak. The objective of this report is to provide evidence to support decision-making for strategies to respond to the outbreak to ensure that the health, protection and economic security of women and girls is prioritised. Read More...

COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis DR Congo

Depuis le début de l’épidémie déclarée le 10 mars 2020 jusqu’en date du 26 Aout 2020, le cumul des cas est de 9.915, dont 9.914 cas confirmés et 1 cas probable. Au total, il y a eu 255 décès (254 cas confirmés et 1 cas probable) et 9.020 personnes guéries.i
En RDC, la prévention et la réponse à la pandémie COVID 19 sont guidées au niveau National par un « Plan de préparation et de riposte à l’épidémie de COVID 19 » publié en début Mars 2020. Ce plan comprend 9 objectifs bien définis mais les aspects spécifiques aux questions de protection transversale et de genre sont faiblement développés.
Quoi que les données nationales qui renseignent sur la situation épidémiologique en RDC ne soient pas désagrégées par âge et par sexe, il est évident que les hommes, femmes, filles et garçons des différents âges, situations sociales confondues ne sont pas touchées de la même manière par la pandémie à COVID 19 surtout que déjà traditionnellement, il s’observe un déséquilibre entre les hommes, les femmes, les filles et les garçons au niveau des rôles, responsabilités, accès et contrôle, participation et prise de décision et au niveau des aspects de protection.
Dans le souci d’améliorer sa mise en oeuvre pendant la période de la pandémie, CARE I DRC a fait une analyse genre rapide période du 15 Avril jusqu’en fin Mai 2020. Une mise à jour a été faite sur base des informations recueillies le 18 Juillet 2020. Cette analyse qualitative vise à renseigner sur les problèmes spécifiques des femmes, hommes, filles et garçons pendant cette période de pandémie à COVID 19. Les éléments issus des données secondaires appuieront la triangulation des informations. Les thématiques d’analyse sont : rôles et responsabilités, accès aux ressources, services et l’information, prise des décisions, influence des croyances, sécurité, et sante / bien être. Les informations ont été recueillies dans les villes urbaines et cités rurales dans lesquelles CARE I mène des activités et a des bureaux et au moins 1 staff. Les provinces concernées sont le Nord Kivu (Beni, Butembo, Goma et territoire de Nyiragongo), Sud Kivu (Bukavu et Uvira) et la ville province de Kinshasa. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Northeast Nigeria – Borno

Borno is a state in northeast Nigeria. Borno has been the epicentre of the Organized A since it began its insurgency in 2009. Records of Boko Haram operations show that thousands of people have either been murdered or kidnapped as a result of the group’s activities from July 27, 2009, through late 2019.
For Borno, COVID-19 is a “crisis within a crisis” and presents a range of challenges in a context with limited resources. In most localities (named local government areas or LGAs), access to quality health services, including intensive care, is limited. Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) e.g. malaria, water borne illnesses (including cholera) and malnutrition represent the main cause of premature mortality in the state. In addition, food security and livelihoods are particularly precarious due to semi-subsistence lifestyles and heavy dependence on the informal sector for income.
Because Borno has been in a protracted crisis since 2009, gender has been a key consideration in the response. However, an outbreak of COVID-19 in Borno continues to disproportionately affect women and girls in a number of ways, as women are more likely to stay home to help with the increased domestic tasks. With the fear of contracting COVID-19, permission granted by men to access health services is decreasing which is negatively affecting women and girls’ access to maternal, sexual and reproductive health services. In addition, Gender Based Violence (GBV) service providers in Borno have reported a heightened risk of increased domestic violence in areas where pre-existing rates of violence against women in IDP camps are already very high. Additionally, with the recent loss of livelihoods, strained humanitarian interventions and inadequate field feedback handling mechanisms, Prevention of Sexual Harassment Exploitation and Abuse (PSHEA) and mitigation is a pressing concern as people in need are left vulnerable in the face of insufficient food and resources. Read More...

IN THE SHADOWS OF THE PANDEMIC: THE GENDERED IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON ROHINGYA AND HOST COMMUNITIES

Since the onset of global COVID-19 pandemic in December, Bangladesh has been in a state of high alert. The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Bangladesh was recorded on 8 March 2020. By 26 March, containment measures were implemented, impacting an already vulnerable population. As of 13 September there have been 337,520 total cases, with 4,401 in Cox’s Bazar and 179 across all 34 refugee camps. However, it is highly likely that these low case numbers are more indicative of negligible testing than of the actual
spread of the virus; the true incidence of the disease is unknown. COVID-19 and the accompanying containment measures have had a significant impact on women, girls, men and boys, including female sex workers, transgender persons and people with disabilities,
across all camps, exacerbating existing conditions, such as overcrowding, movement across hilly terrain, uneven access to a limited number of WASH and health facilities and inadequate access to protection and hygiene resources. This has hindered the ability of refugees to take the necessary preventive measures to limit infections. The host community faces similar difficulties, and, moreover, the containment measures had an adverse economic impact on both host and refugee communities.
This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) builds on the secondary data analysis done in May 2020 by the Gender Hub, UN Women, CARE and OXFAM. This RGA aims to answer the following research questions:
􀁹 How has COVID-19 impacted women, girls, men and boys and key vulnerable and marginalised groups’ ability to meet their basic needs and entitlements?
􀁹 What achievements made on gender equality and the empowerment of women, girls and LGBTQ+ groups are now at risk of being undone by COVID-19?
􀁹 What new or heightened protection and safety risks are arising from COVID-19?
􀁹 How can women, girls, men and boys, and key vulnerable and marginalised groups articipate and lead in the COVID-19 response?
The research was conducted using primary data collected in Rohingya and host communities in Cox’s Bazar between 15 June and 9 July 2020 to understand the impact COVID-19 has had on age, gender and other social characteristics, and to analyse how the socio-cultural context helps or hinders people’s ability to cope with the crisis. The purpose is to generate evidence to support the design of gender-responsive intervention/strategies for the COVID-19 response in Cox’s Bazar that can be used for advocacy and fundraising purposes. Read More...

Haiti COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis

Suite à la propagation de la pandémie de la COVID-19 en Haïti qui a fait, jusqu’au 11 juillet 2020, 6727 cas de contamination et 139 morts, la population haïtienne, comme cela se passe au niveau mondial, est en train de subir les diverses conséquences de cette crise.
Certainement, celles-ci ne sont pas les mêmes partout dans le monde.
Elles changent avec la réalité socioéconomique des pays. Les retombées de cette crise sont de nature sanitaire, économique, psychologique et sociale. Cependant, les hommes et les femmes et les différentes catégories sociales ne sont pas affectés au même degré, selon leur niveau de vie, leur habilité (physique et mentale), leur orientation sexuelle et probablement d’autres facteurs qui ne sont pas pris en compte dans le cadre de l’enquête. L’Analyse Rapide Genre (ARG) vise à fournir des données et preuves sur les besoins
différenciés des femmes et des hommes par rapport à l'impact de la COVID-19 sur la vie des deux sexes en Haïti, en particulier les femmes qui représentent un groupe vulnérable et font face à de multiples discriminations. Cette démarche permettra de développer advantage des efforts sensibles au genre visant la prévention de la propagation de la COVID-19 par toutes les parties prenantes au niveau national, régional et local. En ce sens, l’ARG prend fondamentalement en compte les inégalités entre les sexes, les inégalités socioéconomiques, et tout ce qui peut engendrer des différences dans la manière dont les groupes sociaux sont affectés par la crise de la COVID-19. L’enquête qui conduit à cette analyse a été réalisée sur les dix départements géographiques du pays. Read More...

Regional Mekong Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19

COVID-19 has created unprecedented health, economic, and social impacts all over the world. As of 31 August 2020, there have been 25,405,845 confirmed cases globally, and a total of 849,389 deaths. In the Mekong region, there have been 5,612 cases, with 274 in Cambodia, 22 in Lao PDR, 882 in Myanmar, 3,390 in Thailand and 1,044 in Viet Nam. In addition to health effects and deaths caused by the virus, the economic and social impacts of COVID-19 and prevention measures taken by governments are far reaching and long-lasting, especially in the context of climate change and natural disasters in the region.
For the Mekong region, COVID-19 presents special challenges for high-risk populations, including the many migrant workers, garment industry workers, indigenous and ethnic minorities, refugees, internally displaced peoples, migrants, urban slum-dwellers, and people working in the informal sector, such as female sex workers. As with all crises, women and children are disproportionately affected. COVID-19 exacerbates the challenges at-risk populations face and makes it even harder for women to access the support services they need in times of crisis.

This brief summarises the Mekong RGA, written by Athena Nguyen, Jordan Hoffmann, Laura Baines, Ratha Ra, Rebecca Elias, and Christina Haneef in September 2020. This Rapid Gender Analysis draws from 301 interviews (including 126 women), secondary data sources, and CARE’s research to understand women’s specific challenges in the Mekong region during the pandemic. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Philippines: Metro Manila

The NCR Rapid Gender Assessment (NCR RGA) summarises the gendered impact of the pandemic by putting into perspective the experiences of women, men, girls, and boys from different urban poor communities in Metro Manila. It recognizes the distinct situation created by urban poverty alongside the COVID-19 crisis. The NCR RGA contributes to surfacing knowledge by providing
a space for dialogue and recognising the value of stories to understanding the COVID-19 situation.
The NCR RGA was an inter-agency initiative coordinated by CARE, with participating INGOs Oxfam Pilipinas, Plan International,
Asmae; local organizations ACCORD Inc., ChildHope, Kanlungan sa Er-ma Ministry Inc.; and individual volunteers from DFAT. Agencies served as, or recruited, locally-based interviewers with backgrounds in community organizing or social work. RGA and Kobo orientations, toolkit training and simulation, and regular debriefings were facilitated virtually by CARE to support interviewers in data collection. As this assessment was during enhanced community quarantine in Metro Manila, face-to-face interviews and focus group discussions were not possible. Read More...

RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS TO INFORM THE 2021 HUMANITARIAN PROGRAMME CYCLE IN THE OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORY

The impacts of humanitarian crises are not gender neutral. Global evidence shows that when disasters strike, and humanitarian crises unfold, they have differential impacts on women, girls, men, boys and persons of diverse gender identities. Humanitarian response informed by gender analysis means that humanitarian action incorporates recommendations drawn from that robust analysis, which identifies the shifting needs, capacities and priorities of women, girls, men and boys. A recent report1 from the OCHA Gender Unit identified that several Humanitarian Needs Overviews (HNOs) and Humanitarian Response Plans (HRPs) had made progress in utilising and integrating gender analysis into the humanitarian response planning process but that more progress could still be made, specifically by improving sector-specific gender analysis and the application of that analysis to specific sectoral interventions. The same report identified that the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt) Humanitarian Programme Cycle (HPC) documents had made considerable progress towards gender integration and gender sensitive programming, but that more sectoral and cross cutting work could still be done since, overwhelmingly, the majority of gender analysis continued to focus on traditional areas associated with “women’s issues” such as gender-based violence (GBV), sexual and reproductive health (SRH), and maternal health.
This synthesis report is produced by CARE in partnership with OCHA. It is part of efforts to ensure a more systematic gender analysis is accessible, and utilised, throughout the 2021 HPC process. Drawing on the 2020 oPt HNO and HRP, as well as the Gender Unit’s review of several 2020 HNOs, this document synthesizes recent2 CARE Palestine West Bank/Gaza and OCHA generated gender analysis reports with the aim of helping HPC actors better integrate gender analysis into the planning process. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Myanmar, Rakhine State COVID-19

Despite the number of COVID-19 cases in Rakhine State being quite low, the impact on rural food production and the livelihoods of thousands of farm labourers, who are mostly women, is immense. The loss of food production in the State could potentially push families into further poverty and produce further malnutrition in a State of Myanmar that already has one of the highest malnutrition rates in the country. Additionally, the growth of women’s empowerment, which is strongly linked to financial contributions to the household, will decline.
Women and girls in Rakhine State face inequalities in many areas, such as in employment and payment, division of domestic labour, decision making and participation. Those are likely to further increase in the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. An area of specific concern is in the education of girls and boys, from poor families, who do not have the technical infrastructure and capacity to support, especially with the continuous internet blackouts across the State. Deployed in an operational environment characterised by ongoing volatility, COVID-19 prevention, treatment and containment efforts have faced multiple difficulties. Mistrust of government officers by communities, restrictions on humanitarian access, limited health services, coupled with targeted attacks on healthcare workers and facilities have proved to be serious operational challenges. Read More...

Cote d’Ivoire Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19 May 2020

Pour la Côte d’ivoire, le COVID-19 présente un éventail de défis contextuels dans plusieurs villages et quartiers précaires de la capitale économique avec une population ayant des ressources limitées. Dans la plupart des villes de la Côte d’ivoire, l'accès à des services de santé de qualité, y compris les soins intensifs, est limité. Les Maladies Non transmissibles (MNT), les maladies cardiovasculaires, les maladies respiratoires aigües et chroniques et la malnutrition représentent la principale cause de mortalité prématurée dans le pays. En outre, la sécurité alimentaire et les moyens de subsistance sont particulièrement précaires en raison des modes de vie de semi-subsistance et de la forte dépendance du secteur informel pour les revenus.
Une flambée de COVID-19 en Côte d’Ivoire pourrait affecter de manière disproportionnée les femmes et les filles de plusieurs manières, y compris des effets néfastes sur leur éducation, la sécurité alimentaire et la nutrition, la santé, les moyens de subsistance et la protection. Les femmes sont les principales dispensatrices de soins dans la famille et sont des intervenants clés de première ligne en matière de soins de santé, ce qui les expose à un risque accru et à une exposition à l'infection. Les besoins en matière de santé maternelle et sexuelle, en matière de reproduction se poursuivent en cas d'urgence, mais risquent de ne pas être prioritaires. Le COVID-19 risque d'augmenter la charge de travail des femmes avec la fermeture des écoles parce que les enfants resteront à la maison. De plus, il existe un risque d'augmentation de la violence familiale dans les régions où les taux préexistants de violence à l'égard des femmes sont déjà très élevés.
Les rôles et les normes de genre des hommes doivent être pris en compte afin de garantir que les hommes sont correctement ciblés pour aider à réduire leur vulnérabilité à la maladie et à tirer parti de leurs rôles de leaders et de décideurs au foyer et dans la
communauté pour aider à prévenir la propagation de la maladie. Read More...

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