COVID 19 RGA

Cambodia COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis

The number of COVID-19 cases in Cambodia is quite low (141) however the impact on global supply chains and the livelihood of thousands of factory and migrant workers, who are mostly women, is immense. The loss of income could potentially push families back into poverty and the value of unpaid care work which will increase during the pandemic, is not measured in financial terms, nor seen as a valuable contribution. Additionally, the growth of women’s empowerment which is strongly linked to financial contributions to the household, will decline.

Women and girls in Cambodia face inequalities in many areas such as in employment and payment, division of domestic labour, decision making and participation. Those are likely to further increase in the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. An area of specific concern is in the education of girls and boys, from poor families, who do not have the technical infrastructure and capacity to support online home schooling.

The current health system does not have the capacity to deal with an increasing number of COVID-19 cases. Sub- national health facilities are considered low quality and previous health crisis showed that patients will directly consult provincial and national facilities which is going to exceed their capacity.

There is still uncertainty about transmission of COVID-19 which causes fear and creates potential for rumours causing
stigmatisation and discrimination of certain population groups such as foreigners, women working with foreigners as in bar work and Muslim groups.

Gender based violence is common and widely accepted in Cambodia. Globally, intimate partner violence (IPV) may be the most common type of violence women and girls experience during emergencies. In the context of COVID-19 quarantine and isolation measures, IPV has the potential to dramatically increase for women and girls. Life-saving care and support to GBV survivors may be disrupted when front-line service providers and systems such as health, policing and social welfare are overburdened and preoccupied with handling COVID- 19 cases. Restrictions on mobility also mean that women are particularly exposed to intimate-partner violence at home with limited options for accessing support services. Read More...

Nepal COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis

Since the onset of the global Coronavirus Pandemic, the Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens (MoWCSC) identified the need to highlight the gender and intersectional impacts of the COVID-19 crisis. A Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) was conducted to understand the gender differential impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable and excluded groups. The RGA was also conducted to comprehend how existing gender and social inequalities have been exacerbated by the pandemic in the community and in quarantine situations in Nepal.
The RGA was jointly conducted under the leadership of MoWCSC along with UN WOMEN, Save the Children, with CARE Nepal being the technical management lead. The study was conducted using an Intersectional Approach. Along with primary data collection and analysis, the study was also based on the analysis of 50 secondary documents using the Maxqda software from 31 May to 17 June, 2020. Read More...

Laos Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19 July 2020

As of 29 June 2020,10,280,397 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 505,145 deaths have been recorded across 213 territories countries and territories and 2 international conveyances. To date, the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) has confirmed 19 cases, mainly in the Vientiane Capital. The Government of Lao PDR has acted swiftly since the first reported infection to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Since 13 April 2020, no new confirmed cases have been reported.

Although Lao PDR has been able to avoid the worst health impacts of the pandemic, prevention measures such lockdown, closure of schools and businesses, social distancing and travel restrictions, have had significant economic and social impacts across the country. Gender roles, relations and norms within Lao society have influenced the impact of these measures on different genders. Drawing on primary and secondary data, this Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) has found that the pandemic has both reinforced traditional gender norms as well as provided opportunities for men and women to work together to address the current crisis. This reflects broader gender roles and relations in Lao society in which forces of modernization are challenging and changing traditional gender norms. Read More...

Afghanistan COVID-19 RGA July 2020

CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) draws from CARE’s experience in Afghanistan, and survey questionnaires with 320 people (50.3% women and 49.7% men), and key informant interview (KII) with 59 community leaders (44% women and 56% men) and 18 line representatives (50% women and 50% men) from Ministry of Women Affairs and Ministry of Public Health across seventeen (17) districts in nine (9) provinces in Afghanistan. The RGA points to ongoing severe economic, financial, health, and security impacts that will be especially worse for women and girls. The immediate impacts at the time of this assessment, center around the loss of income, food insecurity, lack of access to basic needs, limited mobility due to government lockdown, increased gender-based violence, and insecurity. The impacts – direct and indirect – fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups, including women and girls, poor households, IDPs, female-headed households, and people with disabilities.
Gender-based inequality is extensive in the country – decades of conflict, food insecurity, and conservative patriarchal norms limit Afghan women and girl’s freedom of movement, decision-making power and access to health, education, and other basic services and resources. The COVID-19 pandemic is exacerbating gender inequalities by restricting the limited rights women enjoy in the country and increasing their dependency. The findings from this assessment show that women are bearing the most significant burden of caring for their families; they have limited freedom of movement; face limited decision-making power at home and in the community and experience an increased level of gender-based violence. All the socio-economic and security implications of COVID-19 will severely and disproportionately impact women and girls. Therefore, it is crucial to ensure that actors responding to the crises adapt their responses, strategies, and policies to ensure that they address the implications that the outbreak has for women and girls.
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Fiji Gender, Disability and Inclusion Analysis COVID-19 and TC Harold

The COVID-19 pandemic declared by the World Health Organisation on 11 March 2020 is presenting tremendous challenges globally due to its devastating impacts. While Fiji only had 18 cases of COVID-19, all of whom have recovered, the economic and social outcomes are significant and will be felt for years to come. The closure of international borders led to visitor arrivals contracting significantly by 43.5 percent up to April and the economy is projected to decline by 4.9% in 2020 under COVID-19. The impacts will extend to government revenue, which is expected to decrease by almost 50% in the next financial year.

In addition to the pandemic, Fiji was also struck by Severe Tropical Cyclone Harold on 08 April, causing States of Natural Disaster to be declared for COVID-19 and for TC Harold within the same week. Although Fiji is used to cyclones, prevention and movement restriction measures in place for COVID-19 made it difficult to respond to the trail of destruction left by the Category 4 cyclone. A total of 250 evacuation centers were opened in all four divisions and around 10,000 people were displaced.

The objectives of the Gender, Disability and Inclusion Analysis are:

- To analyse and understand the different impacts that the COVID-19 pandemic and TC Harold potentially have on women, men, girls and boys, people with disabilities and people of diverse SOGIESC and other marginalised groups in Fiji;

- To inform humanitarian programming in Fiji based on the different needs of women, men, boys and girls, people with disabilities and people of diverse SOGIESC with a particular focus on Gender Based Violence (GBV), Health, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), Education in Emergencies, Food Security and Livelihoods, and Coping Strategies; and

- To provide recommendations for organisations responding to COVID-19 and TC Harold.
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Rapid Gender Analysis: COVID-19 in the United States

The United States, one of the wealthiest countries in the world, also has the highest number of cases of COVID-19 in the world, far surpassing global hotspots like Italy and China, with cases continuing to rise at concerning rates. In this humanitarian crisis, CARE is bringing its global expertise—from more than 75 years of implementing humanitarian responses in more than 100 countries—to the context of COVID-19 in the United States. In addition to its expertise in humanitarian and crisis response, CARE developed the industry-standard Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) that builds upon several efforts by humanitarian actors to bring gender to the forefront of programming. The standardized tool to enable humanitarian actors to quickly build crisis responses that take into account the different needs of people of all genders, as well as disenfranchised groups, the extreme poor, and other groups often overlooked by policy, crisis planning, and data.

Since the start of the COVID-19 crisis, CARE has responded in 67 countries—including the United States—and has published 27 of an anticipated 54 RGAs in contexts around the world. We hope that applying this tool to the specific American context will enable CARE and others to create better responses to the pandemic that meet the needs of all people.

This RGA relies on secondary data collected between May 25 and June 10, 2020. It specifically focuses on highlighting the historic and institutional systems of oppression, gender bias, and racism targeting Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). These structural realities and cultural biases put BIPOC communities, especially the women in these communities, at higher exposure to infection and higher risk of death. Simultaneously, these realities and biases exacerbate the already dire lack of access to basic services (such as health, food, housing, etc) experienced by these communities on a regular basis. This RGA offers policy and institutional recommendations for COVID-19 responses to meet the needs of the most vulnerable and affected communities in the face of systemic race, gender and class-based oppression. Without acknowledging these historic legacies around race, gender, and class in the U.S., the entire nation is at risk of perpetuating longstanding injustices and facing even more severe impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Read More...

Raks Thai Rapid Gender Analysis Gendered Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Migrants in Thailand

Although a number of reports on migrants have recently been released, these have mostly been based on secondary data and stakeholder perspectives, whereas this study aims to give voice to migrants through primary data collection and seeks to provide migrants an opportunity to directly addresses their struggle during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, this Rapid Gender Analysis utilizes a qualitative methodology to identify the differing impact on male and female migrants.
Being away from home during this pandemic, migrants in Thailand are likely to lack access to support services. Furthermore, the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to affect migrant women disproportionately due to harmful gender norms of the host country. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Lebanon May 2020

On February 23rd, Lebanon reported its first COVID-19 positive case. On March 16th the Lebanese authorities responded in a promptly manner by declaring a state of general mobilization and encouraging citizens to observe physical distancing. At the same time the newly formed government adopted a series of measures including movement restriction, curfews, shop closure the temporary suspension of flights. The virus was identified on January 8, 2020 and has since spread to 210 countries, infecting more than 5.33 million people and caused fatalities all around the globe. As of June 16th, Lebanon counts 1,446 COVID-19 positive cases.

The Covid-19 pandemic in Lebanon is a crisis within a crisis. It occurred during a broader socio-economic meltdown that has shaken the country in recent months. In October 2019, Lebanese occupied the streets in various cities across the country demonstrating against corruption, unemployment and sectarianism in the country. Lebanon appears to have responded effectively to the pandemic so far, a number of major challenges await it. With little measures to mitigate the economic impact of the confinement and protesters pushing to return to the streets, the country is entering a challenging era with a major impact on people’s lives; refugees (about 1,5 million) and host communities. It is imperative that measures that address the different needs of women, men, children and youth with particular attention to underlying vulnerabilities of certain groups including displaced people, refugee populations and migrant workers should be adopted in a comprehensive and coordinated way.

The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) intends to highlight how COVID-19 in the context of the socio-economic crisis impacts differently women, girls, boys and men and recommend measures to address and mitigate risks related to the protection and wellbeing of affected population. The RGA is looking into the following areas of interest:

• Gender roles and responsibilities
• Decision making, participation and leadership
• Health, mental health and SRHR
• Access to services and resources
• Safety and Protection
• Access to information and technology
• Capacities and coping mechanisms Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Mopti Mali April 2020

The ongoing crisis in Mali has led to levels of socioeconomic disruption and displacement at an unprecedented scale. There are numerous factors that contribute to aggravate/worsen the situation - political crises, decades of drought, structural food insecurity, climate change, high rates of poverty, and high rates of youth unemployment. In many areas traditional livelihoods have been usurped by political conflict or by drought, causing extremely high rates of displacement and food insecurity. Since 2017 there have been significant increases in violent attacks and rates of displacement, and the crisis continues to grow in scope and scale into 2020 (OCHA 2020).
The first few months of 2020 saw escalating violence and conflict, leading to a sharp rise in internal displacements, the continued disruption of markets, and a deterioration in the supply of basic social services. The results from the recent food and nutrition security analysis (Cadre Harmonisé, November 2019) indicate that from October to December 2019, 648,330 people are estimated to be food insecure – representing an increase of 250 percent compared to the same time last year (WFP 2020).
Mali is a highly patriarchal society, with institutionalized gender inequality that marginalizes women. The effects of the crisis have not affected all equally, and there is significant evidence that there are significant differences, with the resources, rights, and afforded to women, men, boys, girls, and other groups of individuals, requiring different coping strategies. High levels of diversity in ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and circumstance within communities bring about important intersections between power and vulnerability that further prioritize and marginalize certain individuals. As the crisis in Mali continues to rapidly evolve, it is critical to ensure that humanitarian interventions are designed to respond to the needs of women, men, boys, girls, people with disabilities, and other vulnerable groups.
To better understand the experiences of women, men, boys within this highly dynamic and rapidly evolving crisis, CARE Mali conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis in March 2020, with the objective of analysing and understanding how the insecurity and conflict in the Mopti region has influenced women, men, girls, boys, people with disabilities, and other specific groups; as well as to identify and propose solutions to limitations women face to full participation in decision making; and to provide practical advice to decision-making to improve gender integration in humanitarian response programming and planning. Of key importance was the generation of recommendations to the Harande program, a USAID Food for Peace program being led by CARE and implemented in the Mopti region from 2015-2020. Read More...

CARE Zimbabwe Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID-19

Zimbabwe has not been spared by the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID 19). The coronavirus was first detected in Wuhan, the capital city in the Hubei province of China in December 2019. The disease has since spread to every corner of the world causing serious health and socio-economic challenges. As of 31st May, Zimbabwe had recorded 174 confirmed cases and 4 deaths.
CARE carried out a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) to assess the immediate and anticipated adverse impacts of COVID-19 on men, women, boys and girls. The assessment was conducted in geographical areas where CARE is implementing its portfolio of development including food security and nutrition, WASH, education, resilience and humanitarian programs. A qualitative methodology was applied and primary data was collected through key informant interviews, and supplemented by a desk review. Primary data was collected remotely using phones and emails. The team could not go on the ground due to the introduction of a COVID -19 national lockdown that initiated on the 30th of March 2020, and also in compliance with WHO and organisational guidelines on the prevention of the spread of coronavirus Read More...

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