GBV

Expanding Learning on the Effectiveness of Integrating Gender-based Violence Prevention, Mitigation, and Response and Cash and Voucher Assistance

This program aimed to include adult women and men, aged 18 years or older, who were survivors of or at risk of GBV, including those with diverse SOGIESC and those living with a disability or disabilities. CORPRODINCO caseworkers were all female and enrolled survivors who voluntarily disclosed an incident of GBV. Caseworkers assessed participants’ need for cash assistance for protection, examining the economic drivers of their exposure to GBV risks, as well as the financial barriers to their recovery; this process took place according to the program’s standard operating procedures, which were aligned with best practice guidance and tools. Survivors who met the program’s eligibility criteria and were enrolled were guided through the steps of the cash referral during GBV case management by their caseworker. Read More...

Stand Up, Speak Out: Breaking the silence around gender based violence among ethnic minority communities in Northern Vietnam

Violence against women is a global issue. Eliminating violence is one of the key priorities for countries worked to promote gender equality. The National study on violence against women in Vietnam in 2010 and 20191 showed that most violence against women is perpetrated by husbands/partners or acquaintances. Most cases are unreported to the authorities. Gender inequality is both an underlying cause and a consequence of violence against women – gender inequality is more common where women are undervalued compared to men and still experienced violence, which hampers women's empowerment.
The Vietnamese Government has implemented numerous programs and action plans on preventing and responding to gender based violence (GBV)/domestic violence,and has supported civil society organizations (CSOs) in implementing intervention projects on GBV. In such a general context, with the support of the European Union, the SUSO project implemented by CARE International in Vietnam and Light has been carried out in 4 communes: Muong Phang, Pa Khoang, Thanh Nua and Hua Thanh of Dien Bien province, which is a poor province in the socio-economic region with the highest density of poor population (MOLISA and other organizations, 2018), from March 2018 to January 2022, with the goal of breaking the silence around GBV among ethnic minority communities in Northern Vietnam.
This final evaluation report aims to assess the project’s impacts/outcomes and key lessons learned using the OECD/DAC criteria as the guideline. Read More...

Assessment on “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response”

In response to the health and protection needs of the Rohingya refugees and the host communities in Cox´s Bazar, CARE is implementing the project “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response” with funding support by German Federal Foreign Office. This is a two year project targeting Rohingya refuges of camp 11, 12, 15 and 16 and vulnerable host communities of Jaliapalong union for GBV and SRH services.

Indicator 1: %of targeted refugee and host community report an improved environment for women and girls following the implementation of SRH and GBV prevention measures
i. 93% respondents have good and very good understanding on available SRH service
ii. Proportion of women who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use and reproductive health care. 17% of interviewed women can make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use and reproductive health care.
iii. 32% of interviewed female from both host community and refugee community received both Anti-natal Care (ANC) and Post Natal Care (PNC).
So, we can say that, 47% (average of result of three proxy indicator) of targeted refugee and host community report an improved environment for women and girls following the implementation of SRH prevention measures.
iv. 49% of women and girls reporting feeling safe following the implementation of GBV prevention measures
v. 63% respondents (male 21`% and female 42%) go to community leaders for seeking help when they face any form of violence both in their home and also outside of their home
Here, “56% of targeted refugee and host community report an improved environment for women and girls following the implementation of GBV prevention”
Considering the average result of above GBV and SRH indicators, we can say that, 51.5% of targeted refugee and host community reported an improved environment for women and girls on SRH and GBV prevention measures at the baseline of the project.
Indicator 2: # of people (m/f) accessing services and information on SRH services and GBV prevention and response
Indicator 3: % of refugees and host population who report satisfaction with GBV and SRH assistance
i. 70% respondents from refugee and host community reported full satisfaction with GBV assistance
ii. 87% female and 65% male from refugee and host community reported full satisfaction with SRH assistance. (Among them 67% female from refugee and 20% female from host community, 45% male from refugee community and 20% male from host community)
Indicator 4: % of staff members with improved knowledge on SHR and GBV
Inicator 5: 45% of men and boys who report rejecting intimate partner violence and domestic violence
80% of staff members with improved knowledge on SHR and GBV
Indicator 5: # of women and adolescent girls having received MHM kit
i. Most of the respondents (85%) use reusable clothes
ii. 90% respondents wash and use the cloth again
Read More...

STRENGTHENING WOMEN AND YOUTH AT RISK OF GENDER BASED VIOLENCE Challenges and opportunities for enhancing resilience, with a focus on urban contexts and adolescent girls

This learning brief documents challenges, capacities and opportunities of women and youth at risk of gender based violence (GBV), in particular in urban areas in Northern Uganda. It summarizes key findings from various studies of the Women and Youth Resilience Project (WAYREP), including two Rapid Gender Analyses, the baseline, knowledge model papers, and a qualitative assessment.
The learning brief informs WAYREP’s learning agenda which aims at:
 Gaining a better understanding of the livelihood and safety, security, and wellbeing challenges that marginalised and vulnerable communities face in urban poor and settlement settings with a focus on girls,
 Identifying and documenting effective and sustainable support strategies to alleviate challenges, namely poverty and gender-based violence (GBV), in the nexus, urban and COVID 19 context.
WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. Read More...

Evaluación final Proyecto Alma Llanera I

La presente evaluación es elaborada con el objetivo de valorar la implementación del PROYECTO “ALMA LLANERA”, el cual ha sido ejecutado por CARE Perú.
Para el desarrollo del estudio se implementó una metodología mixta basada en la aplicación de técnicas e instrumentos de tipo cuantitativo y cualitativo. El ámbito geográfico del estudio de base comprende las zonas donde intervino el proyecto, las cuales comprende los departamentos de Tumbes, Piura, La Libertad, Lima y la provincia constitucional del Callao.
Las principales variables analizadas se corresponden con las características básicas del público objetivo (características personales de las beneficiarias, de sus hogares, acceso a servicios de protección y afectación por el COVID-19), la cobertura, la pertinencia del proyecto, la eficacia y el impacto del Proyecto en función a los cambios esperados de su estrategia de intervención (plasmados a través de sus indicadores de impacto y resultados).
Estas variables se analizaron en la población objetivo del proyecto. Los informantes que proporcionaron la información requerida para el estudio fueron principalmente la población migrante y refugiada atendida, trabajadores/as y promotores de salud, funcionarios/as públicos y privados de las entidades públicas locales y el equipo técnico del Proyecto.
En este grupo de informantes se aplicaron encuestas a población migrante y refugiada atendida por el Proyecto, encuestas a trabajadores/as y promotores de salud y se complementó con entrevistas a funcionarios públicos y privados de los Centros de Salud Mental (CSMC), ONG, Asociaciones de Migrantes/Refugiados y Promotores de la Integración. Para el recojo de información, se diseñó un total de 10 formatos de recojo de información primaria, los cuales fueron aplicados durante los meses de octubre y noviembre del 2021, con algunas limitaciones propias de una aplicación por teléfono (llamadas no contestadas, servicios suspendidos, números equivocados) y otras referentes a la disponibilidad del informante (rechazo directo, falta de tiempo).
Como resultado de lo anterior se presentan los siguientes hallazgos: Read More...

Assistance en abris et protection contre les violences basées sur le genre aux ménages vulnérables parmi les nouveaux réfugiés et de la communauté hôte dans le Département de Bahr Sarah (Moissala) au Sud du Tchad

Présente au Tchad depuis 1974, CARE International est l’une des principales organisations internationales engagées dans la lutte contre la pauvreté et l’injustice sociale. Ses actions sont menées en faveur des populations les plus pauvres parmi lesquelles les communautés hôtes vulnérables, les réfugiés centrafricains et les retournés tchadiens de la RCA notamment dans les Provinces du Moyen Chari, du Logone Oriental et du Mandoul avec l’appui financier de ECHO, BPRM, START FUND, SAF-PAC, UNFPA, MOFA, UNHCR, etc. En effet, dans la zone de Moissala (Département Bar Sarah), le 21 février 2018, un afflux de nouveaux réfugiés en provenance de la RCA a encore été signalé et ce, dans une situation de vulnérabilité due à l’insuffisance des denrées alimentaires, des abris et d’ouvrages sanitaires et où les cas de violence sont récurrents. Ce qui a eu un impact significatif sur les moyens d'existence dans les villages d’accueil.
En réponse aux conséquences humanitaires de cette crise, CARE a obtenu l’appui financier de MOFA GERMANY pour la mise en œuvre du projet dénommé « Assistance en abris et protection contre les violences basées sur le genre aux ménages vulnérables parmi les nouveaux réfugiés et de la communauté hôte dans le Département de Bahr Sarah (Moissala) au Sud du Tchad ». Les besoins humanitaires pour lesquels le projet entend apporter sa contribution concerne trois secteurs majeurs à savoir les abris, les articles ménagers et la protection.
C’est dans ce cadre qu’il est prévu de réaliser cette évaluation finale interne afin de mesurer l’impact du projet, capitaliser les leçons apprises et formuler des recommandations pour l’amélioration des projets futurs.
Read More...

Access Protection Empowerment Accountability and Leadership (APEAL) II project Endline Evaluation

The APEAL II project was a follow on project to APEAL I. The purpose of APEAL 2020 was to Enhance multi-sectoral responses by providing targeted life- saving protection, mental health, Psychosocial support and inclusive services to Congolese refugees and vulnerable host communities in Kyangwali and Kyaka II settlements. APEAL II deferred from APEAL I by; increasing the Consortium members from six (6) to nine (9) after incorporating three (3) organizations, programme scope included changes from GBV to SGBV, disability and Inclusion Services and strengthening the capacity of community structures. The community structures were strengthened to identify, respond, support and refer persons in need of MHPSS, comprehensive rehabilitation, disability and inclusion, protection and SGBV services. The Project operated in a COVID 19 environment which was not present in APEAL 1. As such, the project embedded a specific focus on COVID 19 response.
The European Civil Protection & Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) funded the Project with Euro3,462,889.15 spanning from May 01, 2020 to April 30, 2021.
The project targeted 40,000 beneficiaries split between Kyaka II and Kyangwali refugee settlements and distributed support to 20% of surrounding Host communities and 80% of Refugees. The APEAL II intended to achieve: Enhanced access to timely protection, SGBV, MHPSS and disability and inclusion services, Improved protection mainstreaming and strengthen the capacity of community structures, duty bearers and stakeholders, provide extra capacity in nutrition screening for young children, pregnant and lactating mothers and supportive advocacy for standards setting, and harmonized approaches to refugee protection and MHPSS at the national level.
The APEAL II project end line evaluation was conducted to assess change and impact by comparing data from before and after for APEAL Project implementation. The end line evaluation was constructed on a cross-sectional assessment of intervention focus area, the individual refugees and host community members. Qualitative and quantitative data collection methods were applied with the former utilized to obtain information on project relevance, effectiveness and outcomes from Project key stakeholders including beneficiaries through key informant interviews and focus group discussions. Read More...

Analyse du genre, avec un focus en particulier sur les violences basées sur le genre: Diffa, Niger

La présente étude genre mettant un focus particulier sur les Violences Basées sur le Genre (VBG) s’inscrit dans la mise en œuvre du projet bilatéral MARTAWA ZUROMAYE au Niger et au Nigeria: “ visant à renforcer les efforts centrés sur les survivants et informer pour prévenir et répondre , aux Violences Basées sur le Genre (VBG), en particulier les Mutilations Génitales Féminines et ou l’Excision (MFG/E) et le mariage d’enfant et ou forcé (MEF) dans les communautés touchées par les conflits et l’extrémisme violent dans l’Est du Niger et le nord e du Nigeria».
L’étude a combiné la méthode quantitative, probabiliste auprès des ménages à celle non probabiliste et qualitative à travers les focus groupes et des entretiens auprès des informateurs clés (chef de villages et ou quartiers, leaders d’associations de femmes, et jeunes, leaders religieux, leaders d’associations de professionnels, services techniques impliqués dans la mise en œuvre de la Politique Nationale Genre du Niger, etc.). La combinaison de ces deux approches a permis de mesurer l’ampleur du phénomène et d’en déterminer des causes et conséquences sous-jacentes.
Les résultats de l’étude révèlent que le phénomène des VBG à l’instar de toutes les régions du Niger est une réalité dans la région de Diffa et particulièrement dans les six communes d’intervention du projet. La particularité de cette région est liée à la crise humanitaire en cours qui a aggravé certaines violences et fragiliser davantage les mécanismes de réponses existants.
Les réponses à la question qui porte sur les VBG montrent que la résolution de ces cas est plus du ressort des mécanismes communautaires traditionnels ou familiaux que du système de protection formel.
Read More...

Migrant Women Mini-survey on Sexual Harassment Aung Myin Hmu Project: Industry Solutions for Safe Employment

Introduction
This AMH project aims to provide safe work opportunities for migrant women by working with the private sector and the government to provide in demand vocational training and job matching while ensuring that women can access appropriate social and protection services.
Objectives
The study follows up with the project measurement framework to simplify and better visualize the below project indicators.
1) HLO2.2 % of migrant women who report experiencing discrimination and abuse in public and/or at the workplace
2) HLO 2.4 % of women who report feeling safer due to SH awareness activities and existence of complaint mechanism
3) IO 2.2.3 % of women report experiencing sexual harassment at their workplace
Read More...

Enhancing Women’s Voice to STOP Sexual Harassment Final Evaluation – Myanmar

The Enhancing Women’s Voice to Stop Sexual Harassment project (STOP), an initiative of CARE Australia, has been working since 2017 to prevent and address the under-reported problem of sexual harassment (SH) in mainland Southeast Asia’s garment sector.
At the time of writing, STOP is the only initiative that addresses this issue on a multi-country scale within the sub-region. Operating across a pool of garment factories in four Mekong countries—Cambodia, Lao PDR1, Myanmar and Vietnam—STOP aims to enhance women’s voice and economic rights at both the national and factory levels. Based on a socio-ecological model of violence prevention, CARE Country Offices (COs) are working with participating factories to create workplaces where female workers feel safe and experience less SH through the implementation of standardised SH reporting mechanisms and rigorous training programs. Supported by CARE Regional staff, each CARE CO engages with relevant country, regional and international stakeholders to strengthen the national regulatory environment to promote laws, policies and mechanisms to address SH in the workplace.
In 2018, CARE Australia commissioned a consortium of researchers from UNSW Sydney and UNSW Canberra to undertake an independent evaluation the STOP project and provide a separate Social Impact Assessment (SIA) focused on Cambodia STOP as the particular case study. It is important to note that the SIA is intended to complement the findings of the Final Evaluation (FE) of the STOP, as implemented in the other three project sites. In this way, the SIA and the Final Evaluation should be read as two parts of a single whole.
The STOP project is evidence-based. This strength of evidence is reflected in the rapid review of evidence first published by CARE (Campbell and Chinnery 2018) in November 2018, which provides a comprehensive discussion of how to prevent and respond to SH in the workplace. The continued inclusion of evidence into the project cycle ensures that the STOP project is built on current best practice.
This report provides an overview of Final Evaluation findings of the full STOP project and evaluation findings relating to the STOP project in Myanmar. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all