Post –Project Study

POST-PROJECT LEAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT “INTEGRATING SOCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY INTO DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION

The project "Integrating Social Accountability in Education for Development" (LEAD) is a social accountability project understood as the continuous process of improving collaborative relationships, compliance with commitments made, and accountability between institutional actors and citizens in order to contribute to participatory governance in the education system. The LEAD project ran from October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2018. It was funded by the World Bank's Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA). It aimed to improve the performance of the education system not only within schools but also at the provincial (DPMEN1) and regional (AREF2) levels. During this period, the project was piloted in 50 schools between the region of Marrakech- Safi (Province of Al Haouz) and Casablanca- Settat (Prefecture of Sidi Bernoussi). Read More...

POST PROJECTSUSTAINABILITYSTUDY OF SETU (SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION OFTHE ULTRA POOR)

POST PROJECT SUSTAINABILITY STUDY OF SETU09CARE Bangladesh implemented (2009-2015) Social and Economic Transformation of the Ultra Poor (SETU), under the EEP/SHiREE program funded by former UKaid from the Department for International and the Swiss Agency for Development Cooperation in four districts: Ranpur, Gaibandha, Lalmonirhat and Nilphamari of the Northwest region of the country that is severely affected by seasonal food insecurity. The design of SETU was structured around CARE's Criteria and threshold of calculating multidimensional poverty livelihood opportunities; social inequalities playing out different forms of exploitation, dependence, discrimination, and marginalization; and weak governance at all levels resulting in lack of participation of extreme poor and poor people in Union Parishad and local development processes.This PPS study of SETU aims to assess how and to what extent the graduation model sustains in later years; and the factors that determine sustainability or lack thereof in the same population group. The study followed the same area and sample (418) households of SETU’s end evaluation study and included 95% of households who graduated and 5% of HH who have not graduated. Read More...

Sustainability of impact-strengthening the Dairy value Chain (SDVC) Final Report

Strengthening Dairy Value Chain (SDVC) Project was one of the first Value Chain Development (VCD) programmes of CARE Bangladesh, it had its roots in focusing extensively in supporting farmers through provision of organizing, training and technically supporting farmers. SDVC-II had a more market led focus and a more facilitative approach. It worked across the dairy value chain, ranging from Livestock Health Workers (LHWs), Input sellers, Milk Collectors, BRAC Dairy, and others. This study aimed to measure long-term sustainability of impacts through Market Systems Development Approach. The study focused on capturing the sustainability of the project’s interventions, 5 years after the project had closed.
SDVC built household resilience, improved livelihoods, and helped chronically food insecure households increase their income and dairy consumption. The project focused on implementing change through a set of interventions namely:
• Improving Productivity
• Increasing Access to Inputs
• Increasing Access to Markets
• Improving the Policy Environment
• Supporting Use of Technology and Data
The study adopted the AAER (Adopt, Adapt, Expand, Respond) framework1 for capturing systemic change. The study found that after five years of project completion, substantial linkages remain, and functions continues to serve the poor in a systematic manner. Where we found that market actors such as Livestock Health Workers, Retailers, Collection points continue to function strongly. Similarly, we found that BRAC dairy continues to source milk from collection points, where smallholders supply roughly 70-80% of the milk. Other processors were also found to utilise the collection points in terms of sourcing milk. BRAC intends to replicate the dairy hub model with the use of Digital Fat Testing Devices in the southern part of Bangladesh as well. All processors like PRAN, Milk Vita, Rangpur Dairy were also found to have been sourcing from the established collection points.
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Looking at the Chivi WASH Project 4 Years Later

Four years after the close of the Chivi WASH Project in 2017 in Chivi North, CARE conducted an “ex-post” evaluation in March 2021 to see which aspects of the project, were sustained. The evaluation focused on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); specifically: open defecation status, latrine coverage, and access to an improved water source. The evaluation also inquired about attitudes towards leadership roles of women and girls, and whether COVID-19 lockdowns affected water and sanitation services. Read More...

POST PROJECT SUSTAINABILITY (PPS) STUDY FOR VISTAR-II PROJECT

CARE Nepal and Handicap International implemented a community-based disaster risk reduction project called VISTAR-II in Kailali, Dadeldhura, Kanchanpur, and Dang districts under the DIPECHO-VIIII cycle. This project was for a period of 22 months from March 1, 2015, to December 31, 2016. The project aimed to strengthen the resilience of communities and institutions to natural disasters through building leadership and management capacities from the community level to the national level. After five years of the VISTAR-II intervention, a Post Project Sustainability Study was carried out in two randomly selected intervention districts, namely Kailali and Kanchanpur. out of the four districts. Read More...

Sustaining Women’s Livelihoods: Stories of Recovery 7 Years Post-Haiyan (Yolanda)

From July 2014 to November 2016, CARE Philippines launched Women Enterprise Fund (WEF), a women-targeted livelihood recovery programming that worked on women's entrepreneurship development. The project assisted the beneficiaries from the most vulnerable households affected by Typhoon Haiyan to establish sustainable livelihoods to help them secure their basic needs, generate employment and other economic opportunities by contributing to long-term solutions of addressing social and gender inequality and increasing the resilience among women. Read More...

Post Project Sustainability Study Report: Berchi- Claiming Rights – Promoting Gender Equality: Women’s Empowerment and male engagement for gender transformation in post conflict and chronically food-insecure setting of Ethiopia” (2013-2015)

he project Berchi – “Be Strong!” in Amharic, fully named “Claiming Rights - Promoting Gender Equality: Women’s empowerment and male engagement for gender transformation in post-conflict and chronically food-insecure settings of Ethiopia” was an Austrian Development Agency (ADA)- and CARE Austria-funded project and was implemented during the period of 2013 to 2015. Its strategic objective was to empower chronically food insecure women so that they can achieve sustainable livelihood security in the Ebinat and Simada districts of South Gondar Zone within the Amhara Region of Ethiopia.

The purpose and scope of the study is to assess the impact and sustainability of these outcomes after the project has ended. These results are compared with outcomes from the end line evaluation. Furthermore, this study is tasked with assessing the extent to which the key project results and social norm changes have been sustained after the project was phased out. Read More...

Empowering Women to Claim their Inheritance Rights: Post-Project Impact Analysis

Between January 2013 to June 2016, CARE International Egypt implemented a project addressing “Empowering women to claim Inheritance Rights (WIN)”. This project was funded by the European Commission under the Gender Equality Programme and aimed to strengthen the access of women particularly those in Upper Egypt to gain access and control over their economic rights, resources and opportunities through their lawful inheritance.

The objectives of this impact evaluation was to:
1. Quantify the Impact achieved as the result of the Amended Inheritance Law in terms of people whose rights to a life free from (economic) violence is being fulfilled to a greater degree than before the amended Inheritance law.
2. Assess and analyse if/how the introduction of criminalization and penalties in the Inheritance Law have enhanced the application of the amended Inheritance Law to date and provide recommendations on how its application can be further improved/strengthened.
3. Identify and analyse non intended effects both positive or negative, of the Amended Inheritance Law with regards to women property rights through inheritance.

Extrapolating the model to the published data on vital statistics, agricultural statistics and income expenditure published by the Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics of 2016 through 2019 reveals that the application of the new amendment of the law potentially results in nearly 34,000 more women who can have access to their inheritance annually.

Based on feedback from women’s’ activists interviewed, the effect of COVID-19 and the closure of courts on the number of women affected was believed to be negligible. Many of these cases are extremely complex and usually take many years in courts and hence would not be significantly affected by this delay.

As inferred from the feedback of key informants, it is too early to to identify positive impacts of the law amendment, however, they highlighted some threats that might hinder the achievement of the desired impact of the law amendment.
- The long duration of the legal dispute and associated legal costs
- Procedural pitfalls
- Socio cultural barriers Read More...

External ex-post evaluation of the “Multi-sectoral Protection Response for Vulnerable Populations in Ecuador affected by the Humanitarian Crisis” Project executed by CARE, Alas de Colibrí Foundation and Diálogo Diverso between 2019 and 2020

To respond to the migration crisis CARE Ecuador (CARE), Diálogo Diverso (DD) and Alas de Colibrí Fundation (ACF) associated to implement, with funding from the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) of the U.S. Department of State (that finances assistance actions for vulnerable refugee and migrant populations around the world), the “Multi-sectoral Protection Response for Vulnerable Populations in Ecuador affected by the Humanitarian Crisis” Project (PRM Project), from September 1, 2019 through August 31, 2020. The Project aimed at improving health and physical and psychological well-being of the forced-to-migrate Venezuelan population (and other nationalities), both migrants and refugees; as well as of the vulnerable local population, particularly LGBTIQ+ individuals and women survivors of gender-based violence, through a multi-sectoral intervention that includes: health care, legal and psychosocial advice, shelter, and comprehensive support interventions for the migrant humanitarian crisis. The project also generated advocacy actions to strengthen the capacities of public officials and institutions related to migratory processes, and to promote the restitution of migrants and refugees’ rights.
This report is 78 pages long. Read More...

Participatory community development projects in indigenous communities of the highlands of Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia (GERMAN)

Since 1994 CARE Deutschland e.V. (hereinafter CARE) has been carrying out participatory community development projects in the Andean region with the support of the BMZ. Target groups of these projects were Andean indigenous communities in the highlands of Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. The projects were implemented by local NGOs: Yachachic (1994-2006) in Ecuador, Acción Andina Peru (1997-2018) in Peru and Asociación Acción Andina Bolivien (2010-2017) in Bolivia. As these long-term interventions have so far not been systematically analyzed, it was decided to conduct this evaluation to assess their direct and indirect effects, to analyze the project approach and to formulate recommendations for future CARE projects in the Andean region.
(Full report is in German)
2. Evaluation methodology
The evaluation was carried out through an extensive field study between November and December 2018, visiting 12 indigenous communities in Ecuador, 12 in Peru and 8 in Bolivia. Read More...

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