Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

Looking for something specific? You can filter the evaluations using the dropdown menus on the right side of the screen.

If you have an evaluation or study to share, please e-mail the document to ejanoch@care.org for posting.

Harvesting the Future Year 1

Harvesting the Future aims to increase food availability and consumption by increasing production through the establishment of home gardens for vulnerable families with children at risk of malnutrition.
The project uses the Farmer Field and Business School (FFBS) methodology, a gender-transformative approach to food systems programming, in which women and their families strengthen their knowledge, skills, leadership and confidence in sustainable agricultural practices, climate-smart water and nutrition, livelihood diversification, monitoring and participatory evaluation. Participating households receive agricultural inputs and are encouraged to grow a variety of vegetables on a fixed plot throughout the year. Read More...

EDUCATION SECTOR PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION GRANT (ESPIG) Endline Report

Global evidence has shown that the type and quality of education can either fuel marginalization, alienation, poverty and vulnerability of children and young people or strengthen societal resilience. After the fall of the state in 1991 and the outbreak of conflict, the education system in Somalia remains fragmented and underfunded – with only 0.25 percent of Somalia’s GDP invested in the education system. Significant barriers to accessing quality education in Somalia include minimal capacity to provide in-teacher training; insufficient salaries for educators; high student to teacher ratio; low ratio of textbooks to students; inadequate school infrastructure (e.g., gender appropriate WASH facilities or access to electricity); marginalization of pastoralist communities and minority clans; and an inability to appropriately accommodate students with disabilities.
In response the Ministry of Education, Culture and Higher Education (MOECHE) of the Government of Somalia and CARE have implemented the Education Sector Program Implementation Grant (ESPIG) funded by the Global Partnership for Education (GPE). Aligned with the Federal Government of Somalia’s Education Sector Plan 2018-2020 (ESSP), the overall objective of ESPIG is to increase access to quality education for out of school children; enhance the quality of primary education; and improve the capacity of the Ministries of Education (MOEs) at the Federal Member State (FMS) and district level to regulate and better manage the education sector.
This endline evaluation aimed to assess the extent to which the stated objectives and ESPIG components were achieved (or not) during the course of the project. This study also aimed to identify and explore the factors affecting the achievement of the ESPIG outcomes. For instance, it sought to identify factors affecting access to primary education, as well as the quality of teaching. The findings and recommendations aim to inform adaptations to future GPE investments in system strengthening in Somalia as well as the proposed methodology for their implementation. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis on Power and Participation Shafiullah Khata, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar Bangladesh

The current Rohingya refugee crisis is regarded as one of the world's worst humanitarian crises of the twenty-first century. Myanmar's Rohingya Muslims are a stateless Muslim community that have faced systematic discrimination and targeted persecution in Myanmar’s Rakhine State for decades. As the Myanmar government refuses to give Rohingya any citizenship rights, the vast majority of Rohingya have no legal documentation which is effectively making them stateless and trying to escape from the military’s campaign of violence, killing, rape, arson, and other grave abuses.

Bangladesh has taken in the greatest number of refugees thus far. Since 25th August 2017 a large number of Rohingya people has fled into Bangladesh from Myanmar after facing statelessness, targeted violence and discrimination. As of February 2022, there are 923,179 people and 194,091 households in 33 camps in Kutupalong and Nayapara area of Cox’s Bazar District.

There is limited to no participation and/or influence of Rohingya women in decision making or leadership roles within the humanitarian response in Cox’s Bazar Refugee Camp. Societal and religious norms of the Rohingya are patriarchal and tend to favor men’s participation and leadership over that of women; however, there are opportunities identified to support greater participation and leadership of women in public life.
Read More...

SHOUHARDO III Performance and Impact evaluation

This report evaluates the performance of the SHOUHARDO III project, which targets poor households in the char and haor (wetland) areas of Bangladesh and aims to address food and income insecurity, maternal and child health and nutrition, women’s and youth empowerment, as well as improve access to public services while building resilience capacities. This evaluation employs three methodologies: qualitative inquiry, pre-post comparison, and impact evaluation. The impact evaluation matches communities treated by SHOUHARDO III with untreated communities ex-post, using baseline stunting rates from the 2014 DHS dataset. The evaluation finds that the SHOUHARDO III project engaged more than 40% of households surveyed within target villages and successfully targeted poor and female-headed households. The analysis of baseline and endline statuses (pre-post analysis) of households in the SHOUHARDO III-targeted areas demonstrates that households from these areas improved across several indicators, including poverty levels, the nutritional status of women and children, women’s empowerment, and gender equity. From a qualitative standpoint, participants from areas where SHOUHARDO III appeared well-implemented offers insights into the potential of the interventions. The qualitative evaluation found mechanisms of change in several areas that can be built upon and enhanced. Qualitative findings show that the program succeeded in promoting multi-sectoral change at household and community levels. They also show that SHOUHARDO III effectively targeted services to the most food-insecure, Poor and Extremely Poor members of communities, and its multi-generational and gender-inclusive approach to its interventions facilitated community acceptance. From the impact evaluation, it is likely that we can credit SHOUHARDO III with improvements in women’s dietary diversity, women and children’s minimum acceptable diet, antenatal care access, and the increase in participation across several sectors. In addition, households in SHOUHARDO III villages experienced statistically significant differences in one resilience indicator, and households in program villages that experienced major shocks were better able to maintain their food consumption than similar households in comparison villages. However, the impact evaluation does not find meaningful differences between households in targeted communities and households in non-targeted communities in terms of women’s mobility and decision-making, children’s nutritional status (including child stunting and underweight status), children’s diarrhea, exclusive breastfeeding, household hunger, and improved use of health and nutrition services overall. Improvements in mostmeasured conditions in the SHOUHARDO III program areas appear to have been matched by similar improvements in non-program areas, suggesting broader forces may account for them. Ultimately understanding differences between program areas and non-program areas can help inform decisions about future chapters of the SHOUHARDO III program and other development food security programs to ensure the most effective programs for vulnerable populations. Understanding the dynamics and mechanisms of change and responses of participants to interventions can also inform future work. Salient findings are also important to highlight for action. The research team concludes this report with recommendations. Read More...

Alimentación no tiene límites: Mejorando la seguridad alimentaria de los hogares venezolanos en Perú: Reporte encuestas de satisfacción

Objetivo general:
Conocer el nivel de satisfacción de los participantes del servicio del componente Cash Transfer y sesiones de nutrición en las regiones de Lima, Tumbes, La Libertad y Piura.

Objetivos específicos:
• Recoger la percepción de los participantes del componente Cash Transfer y nutrición respecto al servicio de las transferencias en efectivo y sesiones educativas de nutrición en La Libertad, Tumbes, Piura y Lima.
• Recopilar información sobre la atención brindada durante la entrega de tarjetas y seguimiento realizado por el personal de World Vision y Care en La Libertad, Tumbes, Piura y Lima.

La aplicación de encuestas de satisfacción se realizan en periodos bimensuales. La presente encuesta se aplicó en junio a un total de 432 participantes que fueron registrados en el mes de abril y mayo. El 36.34% (157) de las encuestas fueron aplicadas por llamada telefónica y el 63.66% (275) fueron aplicadas de manera presencial en Lima, Tumbes, La Libertad y Piura a participantes registrados por World Vision y Care Perú. Las encuestas presenciales se aplicaron durante el segundo momento o tercer momento de sesiones educativas de nutrición y las encuestas aplicadas mediante llamada telefónica se dirigieron a participantes que han recibido su tarjeta y que han asistido a su segundo y tercer momento de entrega.

Se contó con encuestadores en las regiones de Piura, La Libertad, Tumbes y Lima, quienes coordinaron con el equipo MEAL y los facilitadores en cada región para la aplicación según el protocolo designado. Read More...

Proyecto Máxima Perú: Rompiendo barreras, construyendo negocios

El proyecto “Máxima: Rompiendo barreras, construyendo negocios”, es desarrollado con el apoyo de Fundación Citi y tiene como objetivo que las poblaciones refugiada y migrante venezolana, quechua hablante, amazónica y afroperuana (así como migrantes de estos tres grupos) de zonas rurales y periurbanas de Lima, Ica, Huancavelica, San Martín y otras regiones del Perú, tomen mejores decisiones financieras para optimizar sus emprendimientos y economía familiar, considerando las barreras de género y culturales. Además, busca formar y/o fortalecer liderazgos en habilidades digitales, habilidades blandas e igualdad de género.

El proyecto Máxima tiene 2 componentes:
- Programa de capacitación en educación financiera y empresarial en español y en quechua para fortalecimiento de las competencias financieras.
- Acceso a información sobre productos financieros (ahorro, crédito, seguros, billeteras digitales) a través de campañas informativas de Inclusión Financiera en español y en quechua.

A través de estas acciones, el proyecto Máxima tuvo como meta atender a 3,500 personas con diferentes perfiles emprendedores: ideas de negocio, nuevo negocio y negocios en crecimiento. Al menos el 75% serían mujeres. Read More...

Integrated Health, WASH and FSL Assistance to Conflict-affected, Displaced, and Vulnerable Households in Amran governorate, Yemen

CARE Yemen has completed implementing CDCS-supported “Integrated Health, WASH and FSL Assistance to conflict-affected, displaced and vulnerable households in Amran governorate, Yemen”. The purpose of this program is to improve health, WASH, food security, livelihoods, and wellbeing for IDPs and vulnerable host communities in Amran Governorate in Yemen.

To set benchmark values for the outcome level indicators and to measure the success of the project in achieving its goals and objectives, a baseline and endline surveys was conducted in the project’s operational targeted areas. The endline survey was conducted with samples of targeted beneficiary households living in Raydah district of Amran Governorate in August 2023. The survey mainly used quantitative methodology (i.e., household survey) to collect pertinent data.

Here are the key survey outcomes:
1. Coping Strategy Index: The average CSI score for the surveyed HHs 9.96 (male: 10.03, female: 9.85), which is indicating that participants are relatively experiencing significant resilience and recovering from using negative food coping strategies.
Food Consumption Score: The average FCS for the targeted HHs is 54.65 (male: 54.81, female: 54.41). In addition, 89.93% are in acceptable food consumption.

2. Household Dietary Diversity Score: The average HDDS for the targeted household is 6.7 which indicated that surveyed HHs is somehow adequate dietary diversity. This denotes a good medium quality of diet whereby households consume an average of around 7 food groups out of the recommended twelve food groups.

3. HHS (Household Hunger Scale): The analysis of the endline data shows that only 2.16% of households faced moderate hunger; whereas 0.0% of households faced severe hunger during the survey time.

4. Access to safe water: about 74.3% of interviewees (male: 78.6%, female: 64.3%) mentioned to have access to safe water from protected water sources such as piped water system and protected wells.

5. Time taken to collect water: Majority of respondents 91.4% replied that the water is “Available inside the house” from the primary source which have been rehabilitated by CARE.

6. Practice of water treatment: 84.3% of respondents (male: 89.8%, female: 71.4%) mentioned treating water before drinking mainly using respectively the techniques of boiling, treated from pipeline, filters, Aqua-tabs, and Chlorine.

7. Availability of household latrines: The majority 98.6% of respondents (male: 98.0%, female: 100.0%) mentioned that they do have household latrines.

8. Practice of handwashing: approximately 87.9% of respondents (male: 86.7%, female: 90.5%) wash their hands at least three out of five critical times of hand washing.
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Mid-term Review: Women, Peace, and Security in Yemen

The civil war in Yemen has led to the greatest humanitarian emergency in the world, disproportionately impacting women and girls. The crisis has further deepened gender inequalities and women’s vulnerabilities to violence and harassment. Further amplifying the situation are poor policy implementation, a shrinking civic space - particularly for women’s organisations - and a retreat in recent hard won gains around women’s voices and leadership within peacebuilding processes.

Despite these realities, the context in Yemen offers significant opportunities for advancing the Women, Peace, and Security (WPS) agenda. Recognizing this need and opportunity, SOS Foundation for Development (short: SOS Foundation), CARE Yemen, RNW Media, and two implementing partners (Manasati30 and Generation without Qat), as part of an international consortium led by CARE Nederland, have been implementing the WPS3 in Yemen since 2021. The WPS3 is a strategic partnership funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) under the Strengthening Civil Society Policy Framework. It is a five-year initiative that seeks to contribute to lasting peace and to building a more equal society through addressing both women’s immediate needs and the underlying causes of their limited inclusion in relief, recovery and peacebuilding processes.

The Consortium commissioned Optimum Analysis to conduct a mid-term review of the WPS3 programme, covering the first half of programme implementation (1 January 2021 – 30 June 2023). The main purpose of the mid-term review is to assess the overall achievements and effectiveness of the WPS3 programme at the mid-point and provide recommendations on how the Partnership could be improved in moving forward. Read More...

Final Review of the Project ‘Empowering Communities to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls in Mannar’

This report presents the findings of the final review of the project ‘Empowering Communities to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls’ (VAWG) implemented by UN Women, UNICEF, and UNFPA in Mannar, Sri Lanka (From September 2020 to February 2023). This project used a combination of social norms and behavioural change, and livelihoods-strengthening interventions to prevent and respond to VAWG. The review objectives were:

1. To assess the extent to which the programme has achieved its output-level results.
2. To examine the relevance and effectiveness of the project’s implementation strategy and
efforts in jointly implementing the programme.
3. To identify good practices, lessons learnt and recommendations from the programme, and how the programme has met the expectations of project teams and the beneficiaries.

Evaluation Questions
This review intended to answer the following overarching evaluation questions:
1. Relevance: To what extent has the project addressed the needs identified in its design?
2. Effectiveness To what extent has the project implemented its outputs to target beneficiaries?
3. Efficiency: How efficiently was the project implemented and delivered quality outputs against
what was planned (including official amendments)?
4. Sustainability: How likely would the project's benefits continue after donor funding has been
withdrawn?
5. Human Rights-based and Gender-responsive Approach: To what extent has the project
applied a human rights-based and gender-responsive approach and identified and engaged the most marginalised groups?

Review Methodology
This review adopted qualitative and quantitative research approaches. It used a quantitative survey which interviewed 30 beneficiaries randomly selected from all divisional secretariat (DS) divisions where the project was implemented. This involved using a structured survey questionnaire based on the evaluation questions and sub-questions. The qualitative research component used a case study method where the ‘whole of project system’ in a selected divisional secretariat (Mannar Town DS division) was examined to provide an in-depth picture of the intervention. A total of 186 UN Agency staff, government stakeholders, implementation partners, and beneficiaries (purposely selected based on their demographic features, roles, and types of involvement) were interviewed through semi-structured Focus Group Discussions and in-depth interviews. It also involved a comprehensive review of programme documents. Read More...

WASH lifesaving assistance and protection services to the conflict affected IDPs and host communities in selected districts of Taiz governorate of Yemen

CARE Yemen is currently implementing ‘WASH lifesaving assistance and protection services to the conflict affected IDPs and host communities in selected districts of Taiz governorate of Yemen.

The principal objective of the project is ‘Rural and urban communities affected by the ongoing conflict and disaster have received life-saving assistance (for immediate needs) and improved foundation to their sustainable livelihood and resilience whereas the specific objective of the project is ‘Targeted IDP and host community households have improved access to comprehensive WASH and Protection services strengthening their resilience.

The project’s key results are:
• Result (1) Conflict affected households have enhanced access to safe water and improved hygiene practices through comprehensive WASH assistance.
• Result (2) Improved access of the most at-risk women, men, girls and boys to critical information and specialized protection services for their protection.

In order to measure the success of the project in achieving its goals and objectives, a baseline survey was conducted 396 households’ visits in Al Mudhaffar, AlQahirah, Salh and Al Maafer Districts of Taiz Governorate, this endline report can provide a critical reference point for assessing changes and impact, as it establishes a basis for comparing the situation before and after an intervention.
Read More...

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