India

Gender Gaps in COVID 19 Vaccines

COVID-19 vaccinations are quickly becoming a story of inequality. Gender inequality is a critical part of this story. In 16 countries where CARE has data, women are less likely to be vaccinated, and less likely to feel vaccines are safe.
There are massive local and global gaps in who can get vaccinated Only 1 9 of people in low income countries are vaccinated, and 79 of vaccinations have been in wealth countries Tragically, wealth and geography are just two factors that skew access to vaccines Another is gender In many low and middle income countries, women are less likely to get COVID-19 vaccines than men are This compounds gender inequality women are already facing in health and decision making Read More...

GENDER AND COVID-19 VACCINES Listening to women-focused organizations in Asia and the Pacific

More than a year into the coronavirus pandemic, COVID-19 vaccines are being distributed across at least 176 countries, with over 1.7 billion doses administered worldwide. Combating the pandemic requires equitable distribution of safe and effective vaccines, however, women and girls are impacted by gaps both in the supply side and the demand side that hamper equitable distribution of the vaccine. Evidence reveals that 75 per cent of all vaccines have gone to just 10 countries, and only 0.3 per cent of doses have been administered in low-income countries. Very few of COVID-19 vaccines are going to those most vulnerable. The vaccine rollout in Asia and the Pacific has been relatively slow and staggered amid secondary waves of the virus. India, despite being the largest vaccine developer, has only vaccinated 3 per cent of the population and continues to battle a variant outbreak that, at its peak, was responsible for more than half of the world’s daily COVID-19 cases and set a record-breaking pace of about 400,000 cases per day.5However, the small Pacific nation of Nauru, reported a world record administering the first dose to 7,392 people, 108 per cent of the adult population within four weeks. Bhutan also set an example by vaccinating 93 per cent of its eligible population in less than two weeks. That success could be at risk, given the situation in India and the suspended export of vaccines. Read More...

Evaluation of Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV and AIDS Services (EMPHASIS)

EMPHASIS is a 5 year project funded by Big Lottery Fund, UK, which was initiated in August 2009 and is due to conclude in July 2014. It has been implemented in Nepal, India and Bangladesh to address both HIV and AIDS vulnerability and safe mobility issues of cross border migrant populations. Its overall goal has been to contribute to reduction of vulnerability of mobile populations (particularly women) to HIV infection across selected cross border regions within India, Bangladesh and Nepal. There has however, appropriately, been an increased focus on safe mobility issues within the last two years of the project. The three main outcomes of the project focus on: 1) the development of an effective and integrated cross border model of HIV prevention, care, treatment and support to benefit mobile populations and their families and target groups at source, transit and destination locations who are vulnerable to acquiring and spreading HIV and AIDS, 2) building the capacity of partner organizations (including regional authorities, government agencies, border police, customs officials, research institutions, NGO, Community Based Organizations [CBO] and key stakeholders) to deliver improved and integrated services to mobile populations vulnerable to HIV, 3) Increasing recognition of the vulnerabilities of mobile populations and demonstration of ways to address them in source and destination communities that will inform policies and produce evidence based advocacy messages with which to lobby government stakeholders. The aim of this evaluation is to assess the project according to its three outcomes areas and to assess the effectiveness and relevance of different interventions. One week visits to India, Nepal and Bangladesh were conducted at the end of January/ early February 2014 by a team of three people, during which interviews and focus group discussion were conducted, and a Lickert Scale tool administered. These visits were then supplemented by some additional meetings in Bangladesh in April, following the production of the first draft report. An endline study was conducted in parallel to the evaluation, and its conclusions are also drawn upon in this report. [88 Pages] Read More...

Vulnerability to HIV & AIDS: A social Research on Cross Border Mobile Population from Bangladesh to India

There are a growing number of people migrating between Bangladesh, Nepal and India. Mobility has long been linked with heightened vulnerability to HIV & AIDS. While overall
HIV prevalence is low in Bangladesh and Nepal, there is a growing concern that vulnerable mobile populations are forming a bridge between high prevalence areas of India and low prevalence areas in Bangladesh and Nepal. Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV & AIDS Services Information and Support (EMPHASIS) is a regional program being implemented by CARE Bangladesh, CARE India and CARE Nepal and led by CARE International UK (CIUK) to reduce AIDS related vulnerabilities among mobile populations crossing the borders of Bangladesh and Nepal into India. This 5-year (August 2009 – July 2014) program, is funded by the Big Lottery Fund (BIG) of United Kingdom.

Baseline Research on cross border migration was initiated to understand the drivers of mobility, access to services for migrants at source and destination, and to understand the risk and vulnerabilities associated with migration and HIV & AIDS. The study was conducted using quantitative methods and a separate qualitative study was conducted to enhance and complement the quantitative data. [57 Pages] Read More...

CASH AND VOUCHER ASSISTANCE IN RESPONSE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

In April 2020, CARE received a five million dollar grant from MARS to implement a multi-country program, including Cote d’Ivoire, Ecuador, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Peru, Thailand, and Venezuela1, with the aim of reducing the negative impacts of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations, especially women and girls, using complementary and multimodal approaches. A key activity of this program was the provision of cash and voucher assistance (CVA) to vulnerable populations to meet their diverse basic needs. Program data indicated that CVA was implemented in Cote d’Ivoire, Ecuador, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, and Thailand. Monitoring data from different countries showed that CVA was unconditional; with cash modality representing 95% of transfers. Key targets populations for CVA activities vary by country and include: vulnerable households (Cote d’Ivoire, and Haiti); migrants and refugees (Honduras, Ecuador, and Thailand); domestic workers (Guatemala and Ecuador); survivors of GBV and other forms of violence against women (Guatemala and Ecuador); and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer/questioning (LGBTQI+) individuals (Ecuador). Across all projects (or countries), participants reported numerous uses of CVA including purchase foods stuff, payment of health services, hygiene services, rental/housing, savings and livelihoods activities.
Given the nature and scale of this program as well as its organizational commitment to learning, CARE was keen to understand the extent to which the project supported and protected vulnerable populations against the loss or disruption of their livelihoods in a gender sensitive manner. The study seeks to provide open-source learnings for peer
companies and agencies on how CVA was utilized in this program with two major questions: (i) How gender sensitive was the process for CARE’s CVA? (ii) How gender sensitive was the intended outcome of CARE’s CVA?
This documentation report compiles lessons from across the projects implemented in the targeted countries and draws from the diversity of their experiences to provide some recommendations on more gender sensitive CVA in the future. Read More...

Final Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation of Women Smallholders and Cotton Producers from Vidarbha Region, Maharashtra

CARE India’s project on “Environmentally Sound and Climate Resilient Cotton Production Practices (ESCRCPP)”, supported by Group Galeries Lafayette, was implemented from 2018 to 2021 in 10 villages of Jalgaon Jamod block of Buldhana district in Vidarbha region of Maharashtra, aimed to promote environmentally sound, climate-resilient and inclusive cotton production. The location of the project was guided by the fact that Vidarbha accounts for half of the cotton area of Maharashtra, which has one third of cotton growing area in India and Buldhana district is the major cotton producing area in Vidarbha. The cotton based agricultural economy of the region faces challenges like water stress, climate variability and issues related to farming practices and technology. These result in low productivity, frequent crop failure, poor management of water resources, and high indebtedness of farmers.
The project had three purposes (sub-objectives or outcomes) and six expected results (outputs). The outcomes were: women small holders have the capacity to engage in environmentally sound and climate-resilient cotton production; strengthened collectives for building solidarity, promoting gender equity, and facilitating access of women smallholders from poor and vulnerable households to resilience building resources, services, and opportunities; and enabling environment in the form of supportive cotton value chain actors.
This report is 82 pages long. Read More...

Learning Women’s Participation in the Cotton Value Chain

The present gender analysis study of the Cotton Value Chain (CVC) was undertaken by CARE India as part of its ongoing three-year project to strengthen CVC in the Vidarbha region of Maharashtra state. The project, operating in the Jalgaon Jamod block of the Buldhana district in Maharashtra, aims to improve the productive engagement of resource-constrained women in resilient and sustainable cotton-based farming. It seeks to empower women smallholders from marginal communities and increase their productivity, income, and living standard to build a strong and sustainable CVC. The gender analysis study was conducted with a view to developing a robust understanding of gender relations, roles, and outcomes as they play out in the CVC of the project area. Read More...

Where the Rain Falls Phase III (2017 – 2019): Final Evaluation Report

In 2009, the Where the Rain Falls (WtRF) initiative started as a three-year research project investigating the impact of rainfall variability on food and livelihood security, and migration.

This research culminated in a global policy report (2012) and the development of more action-oriented community-based adaptation (CBA) pilot projects in each India, Thailand and Bangladesh. A second phase (2014 – 2016), and later a third phase (2017 – 2019), aimed to scale results, impacts and lessons learned to date for broader support for, and uptake of, CBA methods and approaches.

In October 2019, CARE France engaged an International Consultant to lead WtRF’ first multi-county evaluation. As per the Terms of Reference (TORs) for this evaluation (see Annex IV) the main objectives of the evaluation are two-fold:
(i) to assess the degree of achievement of the WtRF global and specific objectives in India and Thailand respectively; and
(ii) to extract common and/or comparable lessons learned about factors contributing to and hindering achievements (e.g. barriers and enablers) Read More...

Baseline Study Report KHUSHAAL PROJECT 2019

CARE India in partnership with Alstom Foundation is implementing socio-developmental projects in 7 villages of District Madhepura, Bihar. Project Khushhaal is one among the many initiatives being undertaken in the identified villages. It aims to enhance the capabilities of women and girls (age 12 years and above) and youth in the age group of 18-35 years for resilient livelihoods and improved health outcomes through a participatory process.

The project aims to empower 1500 individuals (women and girls) from these 7 villages (Tuniyahi Uttarwadi, Tuniyahi Dakshinwadi, LakshmiRampur Chakla Uttarwadi, LakshmiRampur Chakla Dakshinwadi, Ganeshsthan, Shreepur Utarwadi and Shreepur Dakshinwadi) with better health and hygiene practices and have better preparedness for gainful employment opportunities

The study focused at 5 specific areas
1. Menstrual Hygiene related status and challenges
2. Health and Hygiene related situation in young Girls, Pregnant and Lactating women
3. Work and Communication Skills status of Adolescents and Youth
4. Work/Market situation of women Entrepreneurs
5. Social Scenario / Current Situation on Safe Space for Girls in community and social realization regarding it. Read More...

Baseline Assessment for Climate Change Adaptation of Women Smallholders and Cotton Producers

CARE India aims to promote environmentally sound, climate-resilient and inclusive agriculture among cotton producers of Vidarbha region. In pursuance of this aim, it has designed an intervention package that focusses on developing environmentally sound and climate resilient cotton production model plots for demonstration, on the lands of traditionally cotton growing women smallholders in 10 project villages of Jalgaon Jamod block of Buldhana district. To further accelerate the effectiveness of the project intervention, CARE plans to work with different stake holders like women Self Help Groups, Farmers’ Groups and men within households and communities, government functionaries, and market actors who collectively form important components of the supporting ecosystem. Read More...

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