Tanzania

Farmer Field Business Schools and Village Savings and Loan Associations for promoting climate-smart agriculture practices: Evidence from rural Tanzania

How can stakeholders (e.g., governments and their extension services, private sector, policy makers and NGOs) effectively stimulate the adoption of climate-smart agricultural (CSA) practices among small-scale farmers in developing countries? Changes in temperatures and rainfall lead to new risks of drought as well as erratic and excess rainfall (Ericksen et al., 2011; WMO, 2020). Many farmers experience climate change as a threat since crop yields that farmers needed to sustain themselves are adversely affected (IPCC, 2014; WMO, 2020). At the same time, the agricultural sector also contributes to climate change since agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide) are among the significant drivers of global warming (CCAFS, 2021). Read More...

PENNIES TO POWER FINAL REPORT

Globally, women have access to 10% of the available credit, 7% of the training on productive activities and are 40% less likely to have access to agricultural inputs than men. Women also have limited technological inputs and market access, and only 4.3% of women have access to agricultural extension services. Although women provide about 50% of the agricultural workforce, they still lack equal access to productive resources.

Due to looming threats including climate change, an estimated 20% increase in hunger is predicted by 2050. The COVID-19 pandemic and its economic aftermath likely will push 426 million more people into poverty in the next three to five years. Responding to these challenges requires creative solutions that prioritize the most vulnerable, including women and young people. To this end, CARE implemented the Pennies to Power program with generous support from the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation. This final report describes the program’s accomplishments over the full implementation period (June 1, 2019 to June 1, 2022).

Pennies to Power played a critical role in building resilience and increasing the capacity of people to cope with crises. Moreover, it helped create thriving and sustainable communities, where farmers prosper, people are empowered, and the planet is healthier. CARE implemented the program in Malawi, Nigeria and Tanzania to build resilience, unlock market access for women and youth, and ensure they are economically and socially empowered through savings groups known as village savings and loan associations (VSLAs). Moreover, the program contributed to the achievement of the following U.N. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): No Poverty (SDG 1), Zero Hunger (SDG 2), Gender Equality (SDG 5), and Climate Action (SDG 13).
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Endline Report: An interim analysis of baseline and endline data for key indicators

TAMANI is a complex intervention for improving maternal and newborn health in Tabora, Tanzania. The overarching objective of this intervention is to address the challenges linked to (1) the decision to seek care, (2) the barriers to accessing care, and (3) the provision of the highest possible quality of care, collectively known as the “three delays”. Addressing these delays requires a complex set of changes in behaviors, attitudes, access to and use of resources, skills, and knowledge of clients and service providers. The intervention targeted the supply side by improving the quality of care at health facilities, and the demand side through programs to increase utilization of care through community engagement and addressing gender barriers to accessing care by women and their families. Read More...

Climate Learning and Advocacy for Resilience (CLAR) Programme

Climate Learning and Advocacy for Resilience (CLAR) was a CARE Denmark global programme that during the years 2018-2021 provided technical support to CARE country programmes. The overall objective of CLAR was “Adaptive capacity and resilience of vulnerable communities to climate change impacts, risks and uncertainties has increased.” The programme had three interrelated specific objectives, focusing on (1) demonstrating good practice, innovation and impact in climate resilience, and generating new evidence and learning, (2) improving capacity and influence among CSOs and networks on global and national policies, plans and projects on climate change adaptation and finance, and (3) strengthening of climate knowledge brokering for multi-stakeholder, cross-discipline and South-South learning and coordination.
The intention with CLAR was to link practical approaches and outcomes in climate change adaptation work with influencing policy and planning processes, in particular national adaptation plans (NAPs) and finance. CLAR was to add value to CARE country programmes through the provision of technical support for integration of climate change adaptation implementation as well as cross-country learning and knowledge sharing. CLAR targeted both local, national, and global policy spaces to promote pro-poor, equitable and effective adaptation policies, and mechanisms. Through the Southern Voices on Adaptation (SVA) advocacy community of practice, CLAR supported the sharing of experiences and best practices in different contexts on how to influence adaptation policies and adaptation finance. Read More...

Tackling Vaccine Hesistancy and Expanding Vaccine Access in Tanzania with Community Health Workers in the Lead

Since September 2021, CARE Tanzania has worked as a partner to the Government of Tanzania to improve vaccine access across the country. CARE’s logistical support has helped the government to cover large, underserved geographical areas. To increase vaccine uptake, CARE staff has also engaged local Community Health Workers (CHWs) to address vaccination misconceptions and developed improved health communication and data management tools. An initial training took place in November 2021 and trained 217 CHWs in the Tabora region. With these new resources, these health workers on the front lines have put in place two new strategies. First, COVID-19 vaccination is now integrated with other basic health services at local facilities. CARE supported COVID-19 vaccine distribution in 268 health facilities in Tabora Region. These facilities distributed 20,287 COVID vaccines in areas supported by CARE. Second, the CHWs are now conducting targeted outreach informed by local concerns to address vaccine hesitancy in women and children. Now, not only are vaccinations being provided, CHWs have confirmed that women have increased their acceptance of vaccination shots. Read More...

TAMANI (Tabora Maternal and Newborn Health Initiative) Impact Evaluation

According to the 2015-2016 DHS survey, Tabora region has the highest percentage population (45.8%) in the lowest wealth quintile in the country, which reflects high levels of structural inequality that have a direct bearing on reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health outcomes.(2) Polygamy is most prevalent in the Western zone with approximately one-third of marriages polygamous, contributing to high fertility rates. Tabora has a low contraceptive prevalence rate of 21.9%, and the Western Zone has the highest levels of teenage childbearing in Tanzania (38%). The latest DHS survey (2015-2016) indicated that 44.3% of women in Tabora deliver at home.

Given this context, the international aid organization CARE began reproductive health programming in Tabora in 2012 with the aim of improving maternal and reproductive health. This paper presents an impact evaluation of CARE’s second stage of reproductive, maternal and newborn health programming in Tabora, the Tabora Maternal and Newborn Health Initiative (TAMANI), which builds on the experience of CARE in the region and spans from 2017-2021. Read More...

Tabora Maternal & Newborn Health Initiative (TAMANI): Year 4 results

The Tabora Maternal and Newborn Health Initiative (TAMANI) is a five-year project led by CARE in partnership with the Government of Tanzania’s Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children (MoHCDGEC) and the Prime Minister’s Office for Regional and Local Government (PO-RALG). Implementing partners include the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada (SOGC), the Association of Gynecologists and Obstetricians of Tanzania (AGOTA), the Canadian Society for International Health (CSIH), McGill University’s Institute for Health & Social Policy, and Ifakara Health Institute (IHI). The project is financially supported by the Government of Canada and is closely aligned to Government of Tanzania (GoT) health polices, strategies and guidelines.
The Annual Report covers the period of April 1, 2020, to March 31, 2021.The report provides an analysis on operations to date against the Year Four Annual Work Plan. This report also highlights how the project
pivoted to respond to the COVID-19 global pandemic and includes reporting on COVID response programming as approved by GAC in March 2020. Read More...

COVID-19 Response in Tabora Tanzania (Bloomberg)

CARE Tanzania builds on its successful partnership with the Government of Tanzania’s Regional Health Management Team (RHMT) in Tabora Region. Leveraging funding from the Government of Canada as part of the Tabora
Maternal Newborn Health Initiative (TAMANI), CARE’s Bloomberg-funded COVID-19 activities builds on efforts to improve access of and quality of health services across health facilities and communities to challenge harmful gender norms.
In partnership with the Government of Tanzania, activities cover all 8 districts in Tabora Region. CARE provides technical support and training to Community Health Workers, who are supported by the government in their duties.With the onset of COVID-19, CARE Tanzania quickly implemented a digital survey to understand the impacts of COVID-19. The majority of female respondents reported increases in gender-based violence and harassment, with COVID-19 restricting women’s access to resources and decision-making. Read More...

Taking Care of Our Mountains

On Friday December 11, we celebrated International Mountain Day, which was designated in 2003 by the United Nations to bring attention to the vital importance of conserving mountain ecosystems and the critical environmental services they provide.
To highlight the importance of mountain ecosystems and uplift the voices of women, girls, and other marginalized groups that suffer disproportionately from their destruction, we are sharing a report that outlines some of CARE’s initiatives to protect mountains. Developed in collaboration with and under the leadership of CARE Peru, this report highlights inclusive and innovative solutions for mountain conservation by showcasing three case studies from CARE Peru, CARE Ecuador, and CARE Nepal and examples from CARE Tanzania and CARE Guatemala. [20 pages]. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

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