Research Study

Farmer Field Business Schools and Village Savings and Loan Associations for promoting climate-smart agriculture practices: Evidence from rural Tanzania

How can stakeholders (e.g., governments and their extension services, private sector, policy makers and NGOs) effectively stimulate the adoption of climate-smart agricultural (CSA) practices among small-scale farmers in developing countries? Changes in temperatures and rainfall lead to new risks of drought as well as erratic and excess rainfall (Ericksen et al., 2011; WMO, 2020). Many farmers experience climate change as a threat since crop yields that farmers needed to sustain themselves are adversely affected (IPCC, 2014; WMO, 2020). At the same time, the agricultural sector also contributes to climate change since agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide) are among the significant drivers of global warming (CCAFS, 2021). Read More...

Aplicación de la herramienta del Interagency Standing Committee (IASC) en proveedores de Centros de Salud Mental Comunitario y Centros Emergencia Mujer

Implementar el levantamiento y procesamiento de información sobre conocimientos, actitudes y habilidades prácticas para la gestión de casos de personas migrantes y refugiadas sobrevivientes de violencia de género. Read More...

VSLA By the Numbers: A Comprehensive Analysis of the Impact and ROI of VSLAs

Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs) have been a foundational programmatic approach at CARE since 1991. Since then, CARE has helped over 13.7 million people join savings groups. The savings group model has been adopted and adapted by a variety of organizations globally. Through this report, we will examine the social and financial effects and returns of savings groups as well as how groups affected members’ resilience to COVID-19. The results gave an overview of the financial return on investment (ROI), group economic outcomes, savings groups costs, and individual and household effects for savings groups both inside and outside of CARE.

In order to calculate a return on investment, the financial benefit for a typical participant over three years was considered as well as the financial benefits for a replicated VSLA for two years related to the cost that the donor/implementer spends to set up and oversee the VSLA for its first cycle. Using internal CARE data such as budgets, evaluation, and impact reports, the average ROI of costs to establish a saving group was between 7:1 and 20:1. For every $1 invested by CARE, there is evidence for the savings of a typical VSLA participant to increase between $7 and $20. For the average VSLA participant, median income increased by $9.35 (+/- $0.55 USD) within the first year of joining the group for each $1 USD invested. Additionally, average income increased by $18.85 (+/-$1.15 USD) within five years of each $1 USD invested. Using industry data and internal CARE data, this analysis showed that for every $250 USD invested three net new children attended school.

The financial effect of a VSLA appears to outlast the formal lifecycle of the group. Evaluation of VSLAs as they phased out found that the return on savings (ROS) was 50% (+/-10%) during the supported formal lifecycle of the group and decreased to around 35% (+/-19%) after the VSLA is phased out. However, the positive outcomes and impact of participating in VSLAs continue even after project phase out. Members continue saving and getting benefits. Share value even increase for 57% (+/-13%) of groups in the available data.
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Food Security and Gender Equality: A synergistic understudied symphony

As women keep feeding the world, we must give them the right space in our data collection methods and analysis to make the gaps they encounter visible and find solutions that include those. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the correlation between gender inequality values and food security scores worldwide combined with existing literature and rich studies on the links between gender and food in specific contexts to create powerful insights on the need that the world needs to produce, publish, and use more consistent data on gender equality and food. Read More...

The impact of commodity price hikes on poor and extreme poor households – SHOUHARDO III

Between June and July month, the SHOUHARDOIII program conducted its annual Beneficiary Based Survey (BBS) and captured the impact of recent price hikes on the life of the program participants. The SHOUHARDOIII program reaches over 475,228 members of 168,535 poor and extremely poor households in Bangladesh. The findings of the annual survey confirm that households are experiencing an increase in the price of essential commodities over the last six months. Read More...

Harvesting the Outcomes of SHOUHARDO III’s Local Service Provision Model of Micro Seed Dealers and Micro Seed Retailers (MSD/MSR)

SHOUHARDO III aims to ensure sustainable agriculture and livelihood for its beneficiaries. Part of this entailed forming community groups consisting of both men and women farmers, as well as increasing their capability in terms of quality seeds, agricultural technology, input and output markets, and connections with public and private actors. Read More...

COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance among People in Kailali, Nepal

COVID-19 has caused massive disruption and destruction worldwide, with millions of deaths since 2019. Vaccination plays a vital role in ending COVID-19. The objective of the study was to assess
the acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine and its determinants among the general population aged 18 years and above. A total of 506 participants were interviewed in the study. A quantitative questionnaire covered socio-demographic characteristics of the respondent's knowledge related to the vaccine, misconceptions related to the vaccine, perceived reliable sources, and acceptability of the vaccine. The COVID-19 vaccine acceptance rate was 76% in the study area. The vaccine acceptance rate was slightly lower among female participants (74%) in comparison to their male counterparts (78%). The Bivariate analysis showed a significant association of acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine with the municipality, caste/ethnicity, and family type. Similarly, in the multivariate analysis, religion, caste/ethnicity, and disability statuses were found to be significantly associated with vaccine acceptance. Concluding that the COVID-19 pandemic cannot be curbed if people do not accept the vaccine. The findings of the study showed that a considerable proportion of the respondents did not accept the vaccine due to fear of the side effects and doubt about vaccine efficacy. Therefore there is a need to increase advocacy and awareness of the COVID-19 vaccine to increase people's trust in it. Read More...

Strengthening Approaches for Maximizing Maternal and Newborn Health (SAMMAN)

The use of the family planning method enables people to achieve their desired number of children and helps to reduce unintended and high-risk pregnancies and unsafe abortions, which contributes to saving the lives of many women. The main objective of this study is to examine the post-intervention impact on the use of family planning methods among married women of reproductive age in Nepal. Read More...

CARE in the Pacific PARTNERSHIPS RESEARCH REPORT

Partnership is central to CARE International’s global vision where poverty has been overcome and all people live with dignity and security. CARE International’s partnerships in the Pacific are carried out through CARE Australia managed country offices in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Vanuatu, and through the CARE in the Pacific team (which sits under CARE Australia) which manage partnerships in countries where CARE Australia does not have a country office. This currently includes Fiji, Kiribati, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, and Tuvalu. CARE Australia is in the process of developing its Pacific strategy. Central to this process is understanding its approaches to partnership and supporting local leadership with its partners in Fiji, Kiribati, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, and Tuvalu. CARE in the Pacific commissioned this Partnerships Research to document its partnership approach and reflect key contributions and gaps to advancing localisation for its partners in the Pacific. The research was conducted during September and November 2021 and involved CARE in the Pacific and 12 partners in Fiji, Kiribati, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, and Tuvalu.

What this research report does
⮚ Documents CARE in the Pacific’s partnership approach and the key features of the partnership that are supporting locally led outcomes
⮚ Employs a qualitative approach drawing on the voice of partners through feedback captured during interviews, and secondary documentation related to CARE’s partnership and localisation practice, and current sector discourse on localisation to demonstrate how CARE in the Pacific is supporting localisation, and approaches hindering locally led outcomes
⮚ Identifies actions and approaches for CARE in the Pacific for charting a more strategic course for partnership and localisation by building on existing positive practices and considering areas for improving partnership practice to better support localisation

Key findings
Partnership findings
⮚ CARE’s partnership can be characterised by long-term and short-term partnerships. The long-term partnership is guided by a high-level partnership agreement with sub-agreements developed for project or program specific engagement. Capacity strengthening is focused on supporting organisation-wide learning and growth. The short-term partnership usually begins with CARE either securing or identifying a funding opportunity. Based on consultation and shared objectives, agreement is sought to work together and co-design proposals/projects. A sub agreement guides the engagement. Capacity strengthening (informed by due diligence assessments) is largely focused on ensuring partners can meet CARE’s program quality, administrative and financial requirements, including donor compliance requirements.
⮚ Both long-term and short-term partnerships are contributing to positive change, in advancing CARE’s strategic objective of achieving greater impact through partnerships, and for partners, helping to achieve positive change at organisational and community levels. Having both short-term and long-term partnerships allow for flexibility in the partnership and as partnering is also influenced by the amount of funding CARE has available to support partners. A long-term partnering approach would better position CARE to achieve its broader partnership goals for transformed partnerships in the Pacific for reduced poverty and inequality. A key consideration is for CARE to articulate how it will support partners who want to transition to long-term partnerships, the strategy to engage long-term partnerships and with which organisations it will establish such partnerships.
⮚ CARE’s approach is grounded in supporting partners to achieve their mandate and objectives, working within partners priorities, and partners strengths. Partners perceive CARE is taking a partner led approach that is based on shared values and complementary vision, and a strong commitment to partnership. This approach together with the provision of quality technical support in gender, disaster, and humanitarian programming is helping establish CARE as a partner of choice. This is noted by partners as a core strength of CARE’s partnership approach and an area that CARE should continue to build on.
⮚ CARE has strong foundational policies, processes, and principles in place for partnership, but these are not being consistently applied outside of project implementation. CARE has strong processes and principles in place for partnering but these are not being fully maximised, with the focus more on assessing project delivery and results and not partnership outcomes. This approach to partnerships is potentially hindering achievement of more meaningful partnership outcomes, including more effective programming. There is a desire from partners to have more conversations and participate in processes that are focused on assessing the partnership.
⮚ CARE is directly investing in partnerships in several ways: recruitment of dedicated staff and consultants to the CARE in the Pacific team including a Partnerships Coordinator, Gender, and Inclusion Senior Advisor (Fiji), Program Quality Coordinator, Finance & Grants Coordinator and Project Coordinators. CARE is also demonstrating ongoing financial investment in partners by mobilising consecutive funding with the majority of its partners. It will be important for CARE to consider and plan for future resourcing that may be needed to support a long-term partnering approach, acknowledging that CARE largely operates on project specific funding which directly influences the parameters of support CARE is able to provide to partners as this support has to fit within project budgets. Read More...

Estudio sobre la situación de la seguridad alimentaria y las prácticas de alimentación infantil en hogares del ámbito de intervención del proyecto “Ella Alimenta el mundo”

CARE Perú es una Organización No Gubernamental que ha venido trabajando por mas de 50 años en intervenciones comunitarias para mejorar la nutrición y desarrollo en niñas y niños, alrededor de todo el país.
El presente estudio, buscó obtener información de primera mano sobre el estado actual de algunos de los indicadores del componente nutricional del proyecto del proyecto “Ella Alimenta al Mundo”, con la finalidad analizar los posibles efectos que pudieron darse un año después de la Línea de Base y considerando los potenciales factores influyentes en estos indicadores de estudio, en el contexto de la pandemia por COVID-19.
Ante ello, la consultora responsable del estudio diseñó y adaptó un protocolo adecuado con las variables de estudio que pudieran ser medidas de manera online (vía telefónica) como lo han venido haciendo otras intervenciones y estudios en salud pública alrededor del mundo, dado el contexto de la pandemia. La recolección de datos se dio entre los meses de junio y julio del 2021 bajo la modalidad telefónica teniendo en cuenta las restricciones de tránsito y recomendaciones vigentes de los organismos gubernamentales para evitar la propagación de COVID-19 en el país. Se reclutó un equipo de 11 encuestadores con formación de nutrición, quienes fueron designados a tres equipos según ámbito de estudio: i) Piura (Sullana), ii) Ica (San José de los Molinos y Subtanjalla) y iii) –Lima (Pachacámac), quienes aplicaron las encuestas bajo la supervisión de los especialistas y practicantes de cada ámbito, además de la consultora, asegurando la total objetividad y precisión de la información recolectada.
El estudio recolectó información de 569 niños menores de 5 años acerca de sus indicadores sociodemográficos e inseguridad alimentaria, así como también información en prácticas de alimentación infantil en un total de 115 niños menores de 24 meses.
El presente informe final de la evaluación de medio tiempo, resume los resultados de esta información según los indicadores clave y por distritos.
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