Livelihood

CARE Gender Analysis Afghanistan July 2020

Women in Afghanistan face considerable socio-economic, political and power barriers. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the country – decades of conflict, poverty and conservative patriarchal norms limit Afghan women and girls’ freedom of movement, decision-making power and access to health, education, and other basic services and resources. The situation is more dire for women and girls in IDP settlements and contexts. Even though the current Afghan government is publicly committed to women’s rights and empowerment, women continue to face significant gender-based discrimination, bias and violence.

In line with the CARE global strategy, CARE Afghanistan considers gender equality and women empowerment as a primary mission. Promoting a life free from violence and tackling and reducing gender-based violence (GBV) are key strategies for CARE and, with this analysis, CARE Afghanistan intends to explore gender roles and responsibilities and power dynamics within internally displaced person (IDP), returnee and host communities in Herat and Badghis provinces. This research engaged 61 people in key informant and in-depth interviews from Herat and Badghis provinces including community members, community leaders, and representatives from government offices and NGOs. The findings from this analysis intend to contribute to and inform humanitarian, civil society, NGO and government authorities in their programming, policy and overall interventions in the target communities.

This research provides clear evidence that women in the target communities experience considerable levels of domestic violence, perpetrated by close relatives and have extremely low levels of awareness of and capacity to access available GBV support and referral services. 100% of female and 75% of male respondents from Badghis, and 75% of female and 89% of male respondents from Herat agreed that women, boys and girls have experienced violence in their communities. Respondents indicated that the main perpetrators of violence across the two provinces are fathers (33% in Herat, 34% in Badghis) and brothers (33% in Herat and 23% in Badghis). In Herat, 16% of respondents reported that husbands were perpetrators whereas in Badghis, mothers were the third most common perpetrator identified at 14% followed by husbands at 8%. It is clear from the results of this research that women experience violence from many more sources than men. Key informants identified poverty, culture and customs, lack of education and illiteracy, migration, unemployment, political insecurity, narcotics and the lack of information about rights and the law among the main causes of violence. Read More...

Final Project End-line assessment of Shelter, NFI, Hygiene, SRHR and Livelihood Support for Disaster-Affected Populations in Afghanistan 2018-2020

The Emergency Shelter, NFI, Hygiene, SRHR and Livelihood Support for Disaster-Affected Populations in Afghanistan 2018-2020 Project aims to provide emergency assistance to the identified beneficiaries settled in Kabul, Parwan, Kapisa, Balkh, Ghazni, Khost and Paktya provinces of Afghanistan. The interventions covered under this project included Shelter, NFI, WASH, Livelihoods and SRHR needs of the women, men, boys and girls affected by disasters. The sample of 352 households for this end line evaluation was structured as according to the proportion beneficiaries per the different project outputs The two main output blocks of hygiene/SRHR on the one hand and different forms of cash and NFI support on the other are well captured in the end line survey. In addition to the quantitative approach, 8 FGDs, 7 KIIs and 3 IDIs conducted were conducted with the project beneficiaries, stakeholders and the GAC project team.
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Emergency Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Nutrition for Crisis Affected Communities in East Darfur and South Darfur, Sudan, 2017-2019

The project under evaluation was a two-year project implemented in one locality in South Darfur and three localities in East Darfur during the years 2017 and 2019. The Project was implemented by CIS in partnership with two local organizations and in cooperation with the State institutions.

The intervention activities are tailored to address urgent lifesaving needs of the vulnerable communities through improving communities’ access to WASH facilities and nutrition services. Where, the two components are expected to complement each other and the resultant outcomes are expected to reflect on the improvement of maternal and child health in particular.

The ccomparison of the actual implementation with the planned showed that the types of the activities implemented conform to the planned and that planned outputs are almost completed in accordance with the plan in quantitative and qualitative terms. while the number of beneficiaries reached exceeded the target by about 30%.
As immediate outcomes, IDPs and refugees’ camps expressed improvement in their access to safe drinking water, where 98.6% indicated obtaining water from protected sources. They also revealed satisfaction with availability of water by 65% of the HHs and the water distance has been cut to about 320 m in SD and to 106 m in ED, with an average water distance of 213 meter.

Evident progress has been made along communities’ access to and use of latrines, including women, where, 89.3% and 86.1% of target community members indicated their access to and regular use of latrines. The created hygiene awareness has induced the required positive changes in hygiene and sanitation attitude and practices among communities.

In overall, the treatment of malnutrition reached 80% of the cases and for both girls and boys the cure rate is 75% also for both sexes and the Number of MAM cases treated ranges between 10 to 15 daily, while number of PLW treated ranged between 4 to 7 women daily.

Ultimately, The WASH and nutrition interventions the project delivered so far have addressed emergency humanitarian needs of the IDPs and host communities, without which their lives would have been at great risk. The inadequate unsafe water sources are now more accessible, clean and healthy. The personal hygiene and environment has much improved due to increased awareness and positive change in attitude and practices. VSLAs have added a new livelihood means for women and their families by starting to save and becoming economically active and contributing to households’ budget.
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Mid-Term Strategic Review of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity

CARE commissioned a Mid-Term Strategic Review (MTSR) of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity to formulate recommendations for the remaining life of the project to increase effectiveness in achieving sustainable impact. The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is being implemented in 27 Woredas in the three regions of Tigray, Amhara, and Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples and is just over the midway point in its five-year life from December 5, 2016, through December 3, 2021. The purpose of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is to reduce food insecurity and increase resilience for 97,900 chronically food insecure households that are enrolled in the fourth cycle of the Government of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP4), enabling them to graduate with resilience from the PSNP4.

The MTSR for the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity was a formative evaluation exercise intended to provide guidance on ways to improve the effectiveness of the program in achieving intended impact.

Relative to the four global learning questions for the MTSR (see page 4), the MTSR found that the model that the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is implementing is effective for achieving graduation with resilience, but because frontline delivery is constrained by the number of staff, their technical capacities and the degree of supervision and support that they receive, interventions are not always going deeply enough to ensure behavioral change. The program is empowering women both economically and socially through the VESA platform, but there are significant variations between regions; and outside of the VESA, there is some evidence to suggest that women’s empowerment has not yet been well incorporated, especially in value chain participation and MFI linkages. Progress is certainly being made in transferring ideas and knowledge to PSNP counterparts, but that has not yet translated into practice mainly because of resource constraints. Key approaches that need to be added or strengthened in the coming two years include expanding frontline delivery capacities, expanding efforts to ensure that strategies and approaches are well understood by implementation staff at all levels in all partners, ensuring that women’s empowerment is included in all approaches by all partners, and looking for new ways to facilitate access to jobs, either through self-employment or wage employment, for youth from PSNP households.

The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is already doing some very nice work in starting to achieve sustainable impact. The project has strong potential to be recognized as a “great” project if it can make some adjustments.
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Lifesaving Shelter, Protection and Livelihoods for South Sudanese Refugees in Omugo Zone, Rhino Settlement, Arua District, West Nile Region in Uganda

CARE International in Uganda conducted a baseline study to establish the pre-intervention situation primarily on Shelter, Protection and Livelihoods for South Sudanese Refugees and host community in Omugo Zone, Rhino Camp. This baseline findings will inform project implementation approaches/strategies and decisions and provide benchmarks for assessing results and impacts of the project at the end. A quick baseline assessment carried out by CARE and partners in February 2019 identified that Omugo is still one of the areas with needs and requires immediate support. CARE is already operational in Omugo thus allowing for the necessary rapid scale-up and complementary coverage that NMFA2 funding will provide under CARE’s integrated humanitarian response program. On May 16, 2019, the UNHCR officially confirmed partners, including CARE to consider scaling up provision of semi-permanent shelters for Persons with Special Needs (PSNs) and introduction of livelihoods to address negative coping strategies by refugee girls, women and host community youth.
The objective of the Baseline survey for the NMFA2 project The objective was to generate baseline data and assess the status quo regarding access to shelter, reported or perceived protection from GBV, sexual exploitation and abuse and coverage of Livelihood interventions. Data was collected from 371 refugees and the report focuses at three thematic areas, to be implemented under the NMFA project – Lifesaving shelter, protection form GBV, sexual exploitation and abuse and Livelihood component targeting the general project beneficiary population. Read More...

Évaluation Multisectorielle Conjointe Des Besoins Des Populations Hotes, Deplacees Et Retournees Dans La Region Du LAC

La région du Lac, l’une des plus vulnérables du Tchad, fait face depuis le début de l’année 2015 à un déplacement massif des populations réfugiées, retournées et déplacées internes. En fin d’août 2015, les chiffres croisés de OCHA1 et HCR donnent à 84 898 le nombre des hommes et femmes déplacées dans la région. A ce chiffre s’ajoutent quelques 14 000 personnes déplacées internes installées en septembre autour de Ngouboua. Le caractère dynamique des déplacements et le problème d’accès à certaines zones rend difficile la maitrise du nombre des déplacés qui selon la CNARR atteindrait 127 000 personnes.

Les personnes déplacées ont fui les enlèvements, les assassinats odieux, les abus sexuels et autres pratiques esclavagistes perpétrées par les membres de la secte Boko Haram sur les hommes, les femmes, les filles et les garçons dans le Nord Nigeria et les villages tchadiens qui leurs sont frontaliers.

Les réfugiés sont accueillis au niveau du camp de Dar Es Salam alors que les retournés et les déplacés internes sont répartis dans quelques 19 sites d’accueil et communautés hôtes dans les zones de Bol et Bagasola. Cette dernière accueille presque 40% de son effectif sans aucune préparation ni mesures d’accompagnement, ce qui entraine une pression importante sur les ressources et services déjà insuffisants de la zone.

Les acteurs humanitaires dont les agences membres du système des Nations Unies, quelques ONG internationales et des ONG locales apportent l’assistance aux hommes et femmes déplacés mais leur capacité reste limitée en raison de problème d’accessibilité lié à la sécurité et de l’afflux régulier des populations déplacées depuis juillet 2015.
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Wbg035 -livelihood improvment in opt 2493

The Purpose of LIOPT is to improve food security, and community resilience in a way that supports eq... Read More...

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