Learning Brief

An Operational Learning Brief on Integrating Cash Assistance into Gender-Based Violence Programming in Ocaña, Colombia

With the deterioration of the economic and political situation in Venezuela, a humanitarian crisis has spilled into 16 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, including Colombia. Colombia hosts 2.4 million Venezuelans as at
2021. Internal displacement and confinement escalated in 2019, due to a variety of armed non-state actors competing for income from narcotrafficking, human trafficking, and illegal mining.2 Despite being increasingly overshadowed by the Venezuelan migration crisis, the preexisting internal conflict in Colombia has ensured that the country has the second-largest number of internally displaced persons in the world (after Afghanistan), with an estimated 9.2 million people experiencing protracted displacement. Read More...

Ghana: Bringing the inputs one step closer to the farmers

Worldwide, the Ukraine conflict is leading to unparallel price hikes in food, fuel, and fertilizer. Like most countries in the world, Ghana is being impacted by these shocks. In simple words, Ghana is already on the path to growing less food this year. Farmers are not producing enough food crops, which affects their households’ livelihoods, and impacts women and children. To understand more about the current impact of the global food crisis on smallholder farmers and their coping mechanisms in the local context, CARE engaged with farmers in Ghana. Read More...

Nigeria: VSLA Women and the Global Food Crisis

CARE Nigeria implemented discussions with Village Savings and Loans Associations (VLSA) engaged in the Food and Agriculture Organization, and CARE, where they implemented the Livelihood and Resilience Building Project in Mairi of Jere Local Government (LGA). The participant’s cohort was integrated by 10 women. The main goal of the discussions was to understand the impact of the current food crisis and how it is affecting food security, inflation, and raising the costs of living for small-scale farmers. Also, the project team attempted to understand how the current food crisis is aggravated by climate and by the 12-year protracted armed conflict in northeast Nigeria. Read More...

Global Hunger Crisis: Guatemala, Honduras, and Ecuador

Climate change, conflict, COVID-19, and gender inequality impacts food security globally. Together with the Ukraine conflict, the food crisis across the world is worsening. And, smallholder farmers, who already struggled to produce enough food because of climate change, are now facing serious impacts because they can no longer afford inputs for production. Read More...

Localization in Practice: Realities from Women’s Rights and Women-Led Organizations in Poland

During the invasion of eastern Ukraine in 2014, violence against women and girls, especially intimate partner violence and sexual violence, increased rapidly. Since February 2022, the situation has deteriorated to alarming new levels. Exacerbated and pervasive violence against Ukrainian women and girls is a consequence of war, with women and girls continuing to be abused, exploited, and raped in Ukraine and while they flee to other countries. An increasing number of survivors are coming forward, buttressed by additional reports from women’s rights activists, service providers, humanitarian organizations, and UN agencies. As conflict in Ukraine pushes millions of women to seek refuge abroad, those leaving remain highly vulnerable to risks like trafficking, or may face sexual exploitation and abuse when seeking access to accommodation, transportation, or financial resources.

Women’s organizations in Poland, particularly those providing services to survivors of violence and working on women’s rights, are reporting more and more requests for assistance from sexual violence survivors inside Ukraine. Polish civil society has demonstrated their commitment and fitness to respond to the growing humanitarian needs, but the international community must step up with financial and technical support to ensure that a sustainable, localized approach can continue. Read More...

WOMEN LEAD IN EMERGENCIES IN UGANDA

Women have a human right to participate in public life and decision-making, including in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from natural disasters, conflict, and other crises. Yet, women directly affected by crises are still excluded from most humanitarian responses and from public decision-making more broadly. Women’s participation in community responses and recovery saves lives and increases gender equality. Conversely, when women’s voices are not heard, women’s rights and needs are often not adequately met, and emergency response can reinforce inequalities that perpetuate vulnerability, insecurity, and poverty. Women Lead in Emergencies is a CARE global program that supports local women’s groups to take a lead in responding to the crises that affect them and their communities. It is the first practical toolkit for frontline CARE staff and partners with guidance on how to promote the participation and leadership of women in communities at the forefront of crisis within humanitarian programming. Read More...

Lesson Learned from the use of Cash plus in the support of Agricultural and Fishery inputs in Khanfar, Sarar and Rusad districts in Abyan Governorate

The seed security and fishery sector production inputs are largely affected in Yemen as a result of prolonged conflict in the country. The lack of access to these critical agricultural inputs has been attributed to the heavily weakened purchasing power. In response, CARE Yemen through Yemen Humanitarian Fund provided support to 2500 most vulnerable and food in-secured farming and fishing households with cluster-approved cereal/vegetable seeds, farm tools and fishing kits in Khanfar, Sarar and Rusad districts in Abyan Governorate. The same households receiving the production inputs were also provided with cash aid of 50$ per month for 3 months. The cash aid also known as Cash plus was utilized by the farmers and the fisherfolk to bridge the food gap faced before a harvest. Read More...

Lesson Learned from the construction of a 1800m3 capacity gabion in Wadi Hassan Valley, Khanfer district, Aden governorate under Food for Assets (FFA) Project

What is the specific situation that the lesson learned relates to?
It is about this asset that serves and protects more than 5,000 acres of agricultural land from drought and adds value in different aspects such as increasing underground water level of Abyan and Aden, as such, leading to diversified livelihood options e.g. livestock rearing and bee farming.

How is this impacted by the local context/environment/culture?
The agricultural sector is one of the most important economic sectors in Abyan governorate, and the main source of income for most of the people, as many of them are engaged in agriculture activities. Abyan governorate is famous for its agricultural valleys including Wadi Banna, Wadi Hassan, Wadi Delta Abyan, Delta Ahour.

Because of previous conflicts and wars that occurred in Abyan, the irrigation system was destroyed and was subjected to destruction and neglect. The Abyan Delta agricultural area located in the districts of Zanzibar and Khanfar in Abyan governorate experienced high flow of water from seasonal rainfall, however, the flow of water irrigated a small part of agricultural areas in Khanfar and Zanzibar districts. The bulk of these flood water went into to the sea, as well as causing damages such as eroding farmers' lands, damaging roads, damaging irrigation channels, bridges, and even the destruction of homes that affected some villages and population centres.

After the failure of the dam project in Wadi Hassan in year 1992, many irrigation channels, including Hussein Canal, were deprived of floodwater, which led to the drought of agricultural lands, in the process, depriving more than 2000 families of their main source of income. Hussein Canal covers more than 5000 Hectares of agricultural land that has been deprived for more than ten years of seasonal floods, which is its main source of irrigation by torrents.

In this project, five villages (Al-Dergag, Al-Komblyah, Maykalan, Kadmat Al-Saeed qasem and Obar Otman) that are inter-connected as a sub-district were targeted and benefited from the floodwater that came through the Hussein Canal. Based on the community leaders and irrigation office’s request, a 1800m3 capacity Gabion (360 inter-connected sub-gabions each with size 5m length X 1m depth X 1m breadth) covering a distance of 105 meters was constructed in Wadi Hassan to bring water from the valley to Hussein main channel for irrigation for villager’s lands by floods and torrents water. [5 Pages]
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Evidence Review of Women’s Groups and COVID-19: Impacts, Challenges, and Policy Implications for Savings Groups in Africa

It has been more than a year since COVID-19 lockdowns began, and economic recovery is a top priority for governments, donors, and international financial institutions (IFIs) worldwide, including in sub-Saharan Africa. Targeted investments that increase community resilience and spur economic growth will mitigate some of the negative economic consequences of this crisis. Investment in women’s economic resilience and social support is para- mount, considering that the crisis may reverse recent progress in gender equality. Around the world, women’s groups, such as self- help groups, savings groups, and health groups, play an important role in communities; evidence shows promise in their role in promoting women’s empowerment and economic outcomes. They encompass many models, but all bring women together around a shared purpose, such as financial inclusion, livelihoods, health, and women’s rights.
This brief focuses on one specific type of women’s group in sub-Saharan Africa: savings groups. Savings groups are a common form of women’s group and serve as a reliable mechanism for people in sub-Saharan Africa to save money. Members of savings groups pool small weekly savings into a common fund, which members can then borrow against, creating opportunities for investments and women’s empowerment. Savings groups show mixed, but promising, results in improving economic and social outcomes. This brief, written by a consortium of researchers and practitioners, presents emerging evidence from studies in diverse African contexts— with a deep dive into Nigeria and Uganda—on how COVID-19 has affected savings groups and how these groups have helped mitigate the pandemic’s negative consequences in sub-Saharan Africa.
This report is 23 pages long. Read More...

Impact Evaluation of the Strengthen PSNP4 Institutions and Resilience (SPIR) Development Food Security Activity (DFSA) Baseline

World Vision, CARE and ORDA designed the SPIR DFSA to support delivery of PSNP4 while also developing and delivering multisectoral programming across the four project purposes in order to enhance livelihoods, increase resilience to shocks, and improve food security and nutrition for PSNP4 clients. The SPIR project will use community-level programming, training of government staff involved in public service delivery at the woreda (district) and kebele (subdistrict) level, and targeted livelihood transfers to support and strengthen PSNP4. Resource transfers received by SPIR participants will come primarily from transfers received from the PSNP4, as well as one-time livelihood transfers provided to the poorest PNSP clients to support livelihoods and promote graduation. Most other benefits of the SPIR project appear in the form of improved public service delivery and trainings to promote learning and support for community-level groups. For learning purposes, the SPIR impact evaluation combines major core components and innovative new activities under Purpose 1 on livelihoods and Purpose 2 on nutrition, along with selected activities under Purpose 3 on gender and youth and Purpose 4 on climate resilience, into a study design of overlapping interventions to learn what combination of activities has the greatest impact and is most cost-effective at improving SPIR outcomes [128 pages].

Attached to the Baseline Report are 3 Learning Briefs, The effects of SPIR poultry and unconditional cash transfers on livelihoods outcomes, The effects of SPIR interventions on nutrtion and childcare, and The effects of SPIR livelihoods and nutrition interventions on women’s and men’s well-being.
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