decision-making

GEWEP II: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Programme II Final Report

GEWEP II works with and for poor and vulnerable women and girls. More than 8 160 000 women and girls live in our programme areas, and the end programme target is to directly work with 1 022 200.
The main impact is through Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs). The VSLA model came out of a pilot in Niger in the early 90s. Nearly 30 years later, there are more than 6.7 million VSLA members across the globe. Other organisations and governments have adopted CARE’s model, thereby multiplying impact. GEWEP continued to scale up VSLAs, and advocated for governments to recognize the model. The Governments of Burundi, DRC, Niger and Rwanda all recognize the important contribution of VSLAs to women’s economic empowerment, manifested within national strategies, policies and funds.
Women’s economic empowerment opens up for women’s participation. GEWEP supported women to come together and find confidence and common cause through VSLAs. We find VSLA women who actively participate in decision-making in formal structures, and who manage to stay there despite resistance from some men. This is the main success for women’s participation, across countries.
The shrinking space for civil society remains the most difficult challenge. In all countries, CARE’s main approach was to maintain good relations with those that are directly engaging with the field of women’s rights or who control the implementing areas or relevant political processes. This approach was successful in terms of preserving enough working space for CARE, GEWEP partners and other civil society actors working in the same field. Read More...

Comparative Gender Analysis: Women’s Economic and Political Empowerment

The EVC programme, implemented by CARE Afghanistan in the provinces Kabul, Parwan, Balkh and Khost, focuses on empowering women and girls through capacity building and advocacy to promote meaningful participation in decisionmaking and problem-solving processes at household, village, district, provincial and national levels. The total number of beneficiaries covered under the EVC program are 1,753, of which 1,312 are women and 441 are men.

The goal of the gender analysis consultancy was to provide baseline data on gender dynamics, and technical advice and recommendations on women’s economic and political empowerment for the CARE & HiH Afghanistan partnership programmes in the target regions. Read More...

Final Evaluation: Ah Har Ya (Nourish) Northern Shan State

This report presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the Final Evaluation of the project: “Ah Har Ya (Nourish)”. Implemented by CARE International in Myanmar, launched on April 2017, on its first phase for one year, later extended for a further year ending on 30th of June 2019.

The project, implemented in 12 villages of Lashio Township (Northern Shan State) with a target population of 528 Households (HHs), is funded by Latter-day Saints Charities (LDSC). It aims to contribute to food and nutrition security through sustainable agricultural production, access to water for human consumption and farming, women participation in
decision makings and improvement on hygiene and nutrition behaviour.

Read More...

CONTEXT AND POLICY ANALYSIS, ACTION & ADVOCACY STRATEGY FOR THE « WOMEN IN ENTERPRISE» PROGRAM

The present study is part of the development of an advocacy strategy that aims to conduct a comprehensive analysis of existing policies that may or may not be favorable to women entrepreneurs, the context and actors of their implementation in Côte d'Ivoire. To guide the design of a national advocacy strategy for the «Women in Enterprise» Program, with a focus on advocacy for the development of women entrepreneurs.

Data collection was carried out in Abidjan and in the regions of TONKPI and GBÊKÊ among actors involved in the issues of women's empowerment, financial inclusion and women's entrepreneurship.

Following data collection and data analysis, it appears that:
- Policy and institutional framework for women's empowerment, financial inclusion and entrepreneurship is provided.
- Government has made efforts to facilitate the creation of businesses through the Single Window CEPICI, but some conditions limit women in their process to start a business.
- Structures and programs have been created for entrepreneurship development and funds have been mobilized and made available to women, but access to these initiatives remains limited due to the conditions of grant and interest for some and lack of information for others.

At the end of the analyzes, barriers to the development of entrepreneurship were identified; these include low women education, limited access to credit, land and information related to entrepreneurial activities and lack of entrepreneurial culture.

Some recommendations for the development of women's entrepreneurship were formulated to the different institutional, technical and financial stakeholders and areas of cooperation for advocacy have been identified. Read More...

Women in Enterprise Phase II – Taking Enterprise Development for Women Empowerment to Scale – BASELINE STUDY REPORT

Care CIV through Care Nederland has received funding from the H & M Foundation to implement the Women in Enterprise project. This project has two phases, one of which is more focused on entrepreneurship training for women from VSLA groups and women's associations and awareness raising on women's entrepreneurship that has been implemented from June 2015 to March 2017.

In the second phase of the project, which began on April 1, 2017, credits will be granted to beneficiaries for the launch or development of their activities. However, before deploying the package of activities planned during this phase, a baseline study was conducted to get an idea of the situation or environment of the beneficiaries. The results of this study will serve as a basis for establishing the project's performance indicators and measuring the effects and impact of the project over time. Read More...

The end-line report of “Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) Study of Women’s and Men’s Different Roles for “WE SHARE THE LOAD” Project

CARE Egypt in partnership with Ariel has implemented a project called “We Share the Load” to address women‟s economic and social empowerment and provide them with an opportunity to improve their livelihoods. The objective of the project is to enable “Women in the targeted communities to be able to economically and socially participate in lifting their families out of poverty in a society that is built on gender justice.” The project targets 1000 women/female headed household and 200 men, in two main locations within Assuit governorate: Tatalia village and Arab Tatalia.

Evaluation shows that there are a number of females who works just and that the ratio of female to family members‟ labor force participation rate in the targeted communities reached 16.8%, which indicate that women in targeted communities are economically able to participate in lifting their families out of poverty. However, since the baseline study did not measure all the project‟s indicators, the evaluation team could not assess if the goal objective is achieved or not.

On the other hand, the study tried to identify respondents‟ satisfaction with their current financial situation as compared to the year before the project to define the project‟s role in improving their financial situation. Results indicate that only 30% of respondents are satisfied with their financial situation, and 68.3% stated some improvement in their financial situation compared to previous year. This is consistent with the results of the qualitative study where respondents stated that the increase in their incomes was less than rise in prices. Read More...

Empowerment through Education in Afghanistan (Phase 3)

CARE International in Afghanistan (CARE Afghanistan) has been implementing the Empowerment through Education (EEA) Project in Afghanistan since May 2011 and the project is now in its third phase. EEA works with communities in five Provinces (Ghazni, Kapisa, Khost, Paktia and Parwan) to set up a community-based education (CBE) program in rural and remote communities, where regular public schools are located far from villages and conservative social norms and safety concerns severely restrict girls’ mobility and access to schooling. Community-based education is a network of classes, often held in homes, that allow children, particularly girls, to access education in communities far from a government school.

KEY FINDINGS

EOPO 1: Increase children’s, particularly girls, access to basic education in grades one to nine through community-based education.
Achievements
- Girls’ enrolment is increasing for both primary and secondary levels.
- A growing cadre of competent and effective female teachers is increasing girls’ enrolment.
- Girls are increasingly furthering their education and skill-base following graduation.
- Parents are encouraged to prioritise girls’ school attendance through active Village Education Committees.
- Girls view community-based education schools as accessible, respectful and safe learning environments
Challenges:
-Low but continued dropout rates for economic reasons

• EOPO 2: Improve the quality of education through training and coaching of teachers, aligned with Ministry of Education (MoE) policies.
(See report for findings)

• EOPO 3: Increase girls’ skills, confidence and abilities to participate in school decision-making structures and technical skills for employment.
(See report for findings)

• EOPO 4: Increase community support for girls’ education and women’s decision-making in management of community-based education.
(See report for findings)

• EOPO 5: Strengthen stakeholder networks to advance the rights of girls’ and boys’ education through policy and practice.
(See report for findings) Read More...

Women’s economic empowerment in emergency contexts: Niger case study

While discussion of the ‘Humanitarian, Development and Peace Nexus’ continues within the sector, there remains debate as to whether women’s economic empowerment is a luxury, or even feasible in humanitarian contexts where the priority is to keep people alive. Increasingly, however, humanitarians are seeing interventions aimed at women’s economic empowerment in emergency contexts as a key tool to increase protection and support people in crises to live in dignity. CARE set out to analyse whether financial inclusion strategies like community-led savings groups may in fact represent a way to not only respond to crises, but also to build resilience against them, even in highly fluid contexts.

In June 2018, CARE teams conducted fieldwork in two areas where it is implementing ongoing humanitarian interventions. CARE organised focus groups and interviews with communities and individuals in Diffa and Konni where it has delivered humanitarian assistance. The interventions combined blanket cash distributions, and the establishment of savings and credit groups which also provided women with life skills and business training to set up small businesses.

Within a crisis setting, combining a savings group structure including income generation support with humanitarian assistance such as food and non-food items (NFIs) helped women not only to meet basic needs in a more sustainable way, but also improved their independent access to and control over money.

During emergencies, providing women with humanitarian cash to cover basic needs allowed women in savings groups to continue saving and to invest in income generating activities (IGA), rather than using up capital on food.

If crises continue to hit, the positive impact of savings groups set up in emergencies can become strained. In this case, further cash interventions can preserve small businesses.

Membership of savings groups and receipt of IGAs and life skills training increased women’s income and confidence. Membership of a savings group provides psychosocial benefits to women who are suffering anxiety, depression or trauma by providing a social network that meets and talks regularly. Read More...

Gender and Power Analysis Report: Disaster Ready Project, Timor-Leste 2018

Timor-Leste is subject to a range of disaster events, including rapid onset high winds, landslides, flash floods and minor earthquakes, which tend to happen frequently but have a limited humanitarian impact. Higher risk natural disasters include slow onset events such as prolonged rains or droughts, which are particularly severe in La Niña/El Niño years, increasingly affecting communities throughout Timor-Leste. These emergencies are likely to increase in frequency and/ or severity in coming years as a result of climate change. With approximately seventy percent (70%) of the population living in rural areas, reliant on subsistence agriculture and with poor access to infrastructure, services and markets, communities are highly vulnerable to disasters. The high prevalence of malnutrition and inadequate water and sanitation pose additional challenges and impact on communities’ ability to prepare for natural disaster and adapt to the changing environment.

The primary goal of the Gender and Power Analysis is to gain a broader understanding of gender and power dynamics that will affect the success of the Disaster READY project. The objectives of the analysis are to:

- understand how gender and social norms and beliefs influence women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- identify gender inequalities and harmful social and cultural norms that affect women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- identify positive trends, factors and role models that can be used to promote and drive transformation of harmful gender norms and practices;
- identify actions that Disaster READY can implement to promote equality in women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- apply the analysis to strengthen existing activities and ensure that they are not gender blind.

Disaster READY is a 4.5 year, $42.5m Australian Government funded program to help Timor-Leste and Pacific Island communities prepare for and build resilience to disasters.

Implemented by Australian NGOS with their local partners, Disaster READY has a specific focus on strengthening the ability of local communities and organisations in the Indo Pacific region, with an initial focus in Fiji, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, PNG and Timor-Leste.
Read More...

Gender and Power Analysis Report: Water for Women Project, Timor-Leste 2018

This is a Gender and Power Analysis for the Australian Aid DFAT funded, Water for Women (WfW) Project commencing July 2018-December 2022. The project will be implemented in Manufahi, Liquica municipalities of Timor-Leste by a consortium of Water Aid and CARE International, who both have strong country presence.

The project will equip each municipality to lead gender transformative, nutrition-sensitive, inclusive, sustainable WASH services to contribute to improvements in health, gender equality and social inclusion. The project will mainstream gender equality and social inclusion approaches by developing and implementing gender and inclusion responsive national and sub-national platforms. Addressing gender inequalities and social exclusion is fundamental to WASH and is embedded in each of the four outcomes of the project:

- Gender equality and social inclusion integrated into effective national WASH systems.
- Women and men share roles and responsibilities in decision making in the household and at
the community level, with a particular emphasis on WASH.
- Municipalities use gender transformative approaches to deliver nutrition sensitive, inclusive,
sustainable WASH services.
- Strengthened National WASH sector knowledge management and learning systems, including
effective exchange between relevant sectors.

The purpose of Gender and Power Analysis (GPA) was to validate the activities already considered for the project but also to identify gender equality and social inclusion gaps within the WASH sector that could be further strengthened by the project. Read More...

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